Etiquette

Bride wants every picture, guess what happens

edited September 2016 in Etiquette
There is currently a post on reddit (not weddit for once, surprisingly) about a bride who had multiple signs and made multiple announcements that people were not to use their phones during her special princess day. Her photographers got all the shots she wanted, but she told them she wanted every. single. picture. So they sent here every. single. picture and she got the bad ones with phones in the way. Her first reaction was to print the bad pictures (that her photographer should never have sent her in the first place) and send the booklet of pictures to every guest who she saw with their phone out. Thankfully she came around and realized that was a terrible idea, now those guests are just going to get a nasty little note in their thank you card about how rude and awful they were. But she's not a bridezilla, she's just type a and her special day means shaming her guests for something that didn't even cause any problems. 

Some of the comments are reasonable, saying that the photographers shouldn't have sent her those pictures, she got all the pictures she wanted, but too many people are saying those guests deserve to be shamed for going against the bride's orders. 

Enjoy the read. 

http://www.reddit.com/r/relationships/comments/53ynwa/_/

Re: Bride wants every picture, guess what happens

  • what in world? My first though was why does the OP have to list the age and male or female for each person in the story - is that a Reddit thing or just helpful in understanding the speshulness?

    It also surprises me that there were that many phones in the pix - i know she got them all but I don't remember seeing phones in any pictures we received, maybe a couple from walking down the aisle but that's about it. granted we did not get them all so perhaps there were more and we just didn't receive them.
    spockforprez
  • kvruns said:
    what in world? My first though was why does the OP have to list the age and male or female for each person in the story - is that a Reddit thing or just helpful in understanding the speshulness?

    It also surprises me that there were that many phones in the pix - i know she got them all but I don't remember seeing phones in any pictures we received, maybe a couple from walking down the aisle but that's about it. granted we did not get them all so perhaps there were more and we just didn't receive them. 


    SITB 

    Yeah, that's a requirement for that subreddit, but it also is helpful, as you saw. 
  • peachy13 said:
    The last wedding I attended had an "unplugged" ceremony but the mother of the bride was taking pictures and filming with her cell right in the front row, despite the fact that there was a professional photographer and videographer. Several people saw that the mother was taking pictures with her phone so they whipped their phones out as well and starting filming away...

    I also posted this on SB but a FB friend got married last month and also had a an "unplugged" ceremony, but one of the guests took a picture anyway and it somehow made it onto social media with a caption like "sorry I know we weren't supposed to have phones out but I couldn't help it!" and the bride actually took the picture and made it her profile picture, while the mother of the groom or someone else shared it. 

    What's the point of this stupid, stupid trend.
    I don't think the trend is that stupid. It's a reaction to a behavior that people should really know better than to do. And I don't think it's about needing all of the attention because if you're the couple getting married then that should be a given. I think it's more about how technology has turned the general population into a "pics or it didn't happen" society. Even to the point that people rush to share other people's moments (weddings/engagements/births/etc.) instead of just their own. 

    If I see a wedding hashtag, then that's my cue that it's okay to take/share pictures and videos. And even then, I don't do it during the ceremony. But everyone isn't that observant, I guess.

    There's no way to do the unplugged ceremony thing without coming off rude so I'm not condoning it. And the follow through can be flaky when you try to do it (like you said in your example). But I do understand how the trend came to be.
    SP29cowgirl8238
  • MeetTheLarasMeetTheLaras
    100 Love Its 10 Comments Name Dropper First Answer
    member
    edited September 2016
    peachy13 said:
    The last wedding I attended had an "unplugged" ceremony but the mother of the bride was taking pictures and filming with her cell right in the front row, despite the fact that there was a professional photographer and videographer. Several people saw that the mother was taking pictures with her phone so they whipped their phones out as well and starting filming away...

    I also posted this on SB but a FB friend got married last month and also had a an "unplugged" ceremony, but one of the guests took a picture anyway and it somehow made it onto social media with a caption like "sorry I know we weren't supposed to have phones out but I couldn't help it!" and the bride actually took the picture and made it her profile picture, while the mother of the groom or someone else shared it. 

    What's the point of this stupid, stupid trend.
    I don't think the trend is that stupid. It's a reaction to a behavior that people should really know better than to do. And I don't think it's about needing all of the attention because if you're the couple getting married then that should be a given. I think it's more about how technology has turned the general population into a "pics or it didn't happen" society. Even to the point that people rush to share other people's moments (weddings/engagements/births/etc.) instead of just their own. 

    If I see a wedding hashtag, then that's my cue that it's okay to take/share pictures and videos. And even then, I don't do it during the ceremony. But everyone isn't that observant, I guess.

    There's no way to do the unplugged ceremony thing without coming off rude so I'm not condoning it. And the follow through can be flaky when you try to do it (like you said in your example). But I do understand how the trend came to be.
    I agree. I can completely understand why someone would want an unplugged wedding. There's something about having a phone out that makes a person not as "present". I've read some studies that looked at a tour group where half took pictures, and the other half didn't. At the end, the people who didn't take pictures could recall more details and reported that they enjoyed the tour more than those who were taking pictures. 

    Side Note: My above statement affects the guests' experience more than it affects me. Therefore, I really don't care if they use their phones. I'm hoping they do take pictures so I can see them too! 

    Edit: Also, want to clarify that just because a study says some people have a particular experience, does not mean that everyone does. Clearly this post is not meant to imply that someone who takes photos lives some vapid, undesirable life. It's simply to point out that some people may be distracted by the use of phones/cameras and that could be a valid reason to choose to "unplug" yourself. Notice, I said unplug yourself.. not unplug others. 
  • climbingwifeclimbingwife NYC 'burbs
    10000 Comments 500 Love Its Fourth Anniversary 5 Answers
    member
    lyndausvi said:
    Back in the old days people had cameras.  Now granted there was pretty much one camera per couple/family and not every guest having a camera.  My point is people have been taking their own pictures for years now.    

    Sure there are some guests who are rude, but the fast majority of them are just taking a picture and not getting in the way of the photographer.  Some photographers are so stealth that you do not even know they are there, that you might get in their way by accident.

    The reason photographers take 1000+ photos (mine did 1600) is because even without guests that is how many pictures it takes to get "the shot".   Of the 1600 shots taken 40 ended up in my album, with another 6 hanging up in  my home. (all in one big collage frame).

      The longer you are married the less wedding photos around you tend to see.  Especially if you have kids.  Pictures of new experience with your spouse and family replace wedding photos.  They just do.

    I'm not saying wedding photos are not important, but I think people like this bride put more importance to them than is really needed.  There will be a lifetime of events that will be photographed.  Those pictures will slowly replace the typical newlywed's home of tons of wedding pictures and this issue will seem a silly hill to die on.
    Yes, this times 1,000. Guess what? In the 80s and 90s, people had large cameras and did rude things with them. People jumped out into the aisles to take pictures. In the early 2000s, I cannot even tell you how many times I heard people winding their disposable cameras during ceremonies. This has been a thing for a long time. Obviously it will continue. 

    I come from a family of many professional photographers. Taking pictures and recording videos is our thing. My grandmother basically had a video camera strapped to her head at all times from 1985-1993. To imply that people don't experience things or have memories of them because they were recording them or taking pictures IMO is a little silly. I took thousands of pictures when I went to the UK in 1993. And I remember every part of that trip. Maybe where the difference comes in is that people are now more concerned with taking the perfect picture to post on social media. 

    PrettyGirlLostInLoveInQueens
  • At DD's wedding someone took video of the FG and RB processing then the MOH then DD with H. We didn't hire a videographer. I'm really glad this person did this and shared it with us. He, of course, did it very unobtrusively. If he had been hopping out into the middle of the aisle, I probably wouldn't have been to happy about it.
    PrettyGirlLost

  • Yes, this times 1,000. Guess what? In the 80s and 90s, people had large cameras and did rude things with them. People jumped out into the aisles to take pictures. In the early 2000s, I cannot even tell you how many times I heard people winding their disposable cameras during ceremonies. This has been a thing for a long time. Obviously it will continue. 

    I come from a family of many professional photographers. Taking pictures and recording videos is our thing. My grandmother basically had a video camera strapped to her head at all times from 1985-1993. To imply that people don't experience things or have memories of them because they were recording them or taking pictures IMO is a little silly. I took thousands of pictures when I went to the UK in 1993. And I remember every part of that trip. Maybe where the difference comes in is that people are now more concerned with taking the perfect picture to post on social media. 
    Social media is definitely the difference. Either the guests are trying to get the perfect picture to post on social media with their phones/iPads or the bride and groom want to be the first to post pictures of their own wedding. Therein lies the conflict. I personally feel like the unplugged ceremony is more about the sharing of pictures/videos on social media than the act of taking the pictures/videos.
  • JFC. 

    If I was to get a nastygram from this couple I'd send them a card back that said #byefelicia and end my friendship with them immediately.

    I don't think the trend is that stupid. It's a reaction to a behavior that people should really know better than to do. And I don't think it's about needing all of the attention because if you're the couple getting married then that should be a given. I think it's more about how technology has turned the general population into a "pics or it didn't happen" society. Even to the point that people rush to share other people's moments (weddings/engagements/births/etc.) instead of just their own. 

    If I see a wedding hashtag, then that's my cue that it's okay to take/share pictures and videos. And even then, I don't do it during the ceremony. But everyone isn't that observant, I guess.

    There's no way to do the unplugged ceremony thing without coming off rude so I'm not condoning it. And the follow through can be flaky when you try to do it (like you said in your example). But I do understand how the trend came to be.
    I agree. I can completely understand why someone would want an unplugged wedding. There's something about having a phone out that makes a person not as "present". I've read some studies that looked at a tour group where half took pictures, and the other half didn't. At the end, the people who didn't take pictures could recall more details and reported that they enjoyed the tour more than those who were taking pictures. 

    Side Note: My above statement affects the guests' experience more than it affects me. Therefore, I really don't care if they use their phones. I'm hoping they do take pictures so I can see them too! 

    Edit: Also, want to clarify that just because a study says some people have a particular experience, does not mean that everyone does. Clearly this post is not meant to imply that someone who takes photos lives some vapid, undesirable life. It's simply to point out that some people may be distracted by the use of phones/cameras and that could be a valid reason to choose to "unplug" yourself. Notice, I said unplug yourself.. not unplug others. 

    No, it's a stupid trend.

    1st of all, cell phones are mobile phones and therefore NOT plugged in by their very nature, so it's an idiotic phrase to use.

    2nd, it's fucking controlling, period.  Before cell phones existed people had and used regular old cameras.  I don't recall anyone trying to enforce no camera weddings.

    3rd, the concept of "presence"is idiotic as well.  If you are taking a picture of a subject, your entire focus or presence is actually focused on that subject.  So people taking photos during a wedding are actually more "present" then those that are not. . . who are likely day dreaming, looking around at the surroundings, watching other guests, whispering to ppl they are sitting with, etc.

    4th, the reason ppl are taking pictures is because they want those pictures as a memento of your wedding.  NO ONE ELSE is going to pay for the overpriced prints your photographer is selling.  You as the couple paid for your pictures, but your guests are not going to.

    5th, it's your photographers JOB to get the shots he/she needs w/o having guests, wedding staff, decor, etc. blocking or interfering the shots.  It's what you are paying him/her to be doing.

    As always with Reddit, the rational ppl are downvoted to oblivion by the Validation Squad.
    Wow. You're a bit defensive about this topic. 

    1. If you have a problem with the phrase "unplugged", there's nothing I can do to argue against it. It's a commonly used phrase in regards to social media, cell phones, etc. And if you don't like it, it's your prerogative. I disagree. I believe it's a helpful descriptor of the concept.

    2. I, again, did not say I support "unplugged" weddings. I simply said I could understand why someone would think of it in the first place. I understand how the concept came about. Not agreeing with it's implementation. (Which I clearly stated). 

    3. Your new favorite word must be idiotic. And I'm sorry you're having a bad Friday. But it's a study. Take it as you will. I know that I personally tend to be less "present" when I have my phone or camera. Simply because I'm focusing too much on getting the perfect shot/angle/lighting, that I sometimes forget to enjoy the moment. 

    4. I agree. I love taking pictures at weddings. Again, I never said I didn't agree. I even said I hope people take plenty of pictures during my wedding. 

    5. I think this is addressed towards other comments made, since I never brought this up. But, if you're wondering what I think (which I'm sure you're not), I'm not concerned about photographers getting the shots. I just assume they will do it. 

    And as always with the world, people are very emotionally attached to their opinions and tend to fly off the handle instead of attempting to understand what is being said. 
    Greenjinjo knottie9fb034263c3540ec
  • PrettyGirlLostPrettyGirlLost A Land Filled with Unicorns and Cat Hair
    5000 Comments 500 Love Its Fourth Anniversary First Answer
    member
    JFC. 

    If I was to get a nastygram from this couple I'd send them a card back that said #byefelicia and end my friendship with them immediately.

    I don't think the trend is that stupid. It's a reaction to a behavior that people should really know better than to do. And I don't think it's about needing all of the attention because if you're the couple getting married then that should be a given. I think it's more about how technology has turned the general population into a "pics or it didn't happen" society. Even to the point that people rush to share other people's moments (weddings/engagements/births/etc.) instead of just their own. 

    If I see a wedding hashtag, then that's my cue that it's okay to take/share pictures and videos. And even then, I don't do it during the ceremony. But everyone isn't that observant, I guess.

    There's no way to do the unplugged ceremony thing without coming off rude so I'm not condoning it. And the follow through can be flaky when you try to do it (like you said in your example). But I do understand how the trend came to be.
    I agree. I can completely understand why someone would want an unplugged wedding. There's something about having a phone out that makes a person not as "present". I've read some studies that looked at a tour group where half took pictures, and the other half didn't. At the end, the people who didn't take pictures could recall more details and reported that they enjoyed the tour more than those who were taking pictures. 

    Side Note: My above statement affects the guests' experience more than it affects me. Therefore, I really don't care if they use their phones. I'm hoping they do take pictures so I can see them too! 

    Edit: Also, want to clarify that just because a study says some people have a particular experience, does not mean that everyone does. Clearly this post is not meant to imply that someone who takes photos lives some vapid, undesirable life. It's simply to point out that some people may be distracted by the use of phones/cameras and that could be a valid reason to choose to "unplug" yourself. Notice, I said unplug yourself.. not unplug others. 

    No, it's a stupid trend.

    1st of all, cell phones are mobile phones and therefore NOT plugged in by their very nature, so it's an idiotic phrase to use.

    2nd, it's fucking controlling, period.  Before cell phones existed people had and used regular old cameras.  I don't recall anyone trying to enforce no camera weddings.

    3rd, the concept of "presence"is idiotic as well.  If you are taking a picture of a subject, your entire focus or presence is actually focused on that subject.  So people taking photos during a wedding are actually more "present" then those that are not. . . who are likely day dreaming, looking around at the surroundings, watching other guests, whispering to ppl they are sitting with, etc.

    4th, the reason ppl are taking pictures is because they want those pictures as a memento of your wedding.  NO ONE ELSE is going to pay for the overpriced prints your photographer is selling.  You as the couple paid for your pictures, but your guests are not going to.

    5th, it's your photographers JOB to get the shots he/she needs w/o having guests, wedding staff, decor, etc. blocking or interfering the shots.  It's what you are paying him/her to be doing.

    As always with Reddit, the rational ppl are downvoted to oblivion by the Validation Squad.
    Wow. You're a bit defensive about this topic. 

    1. If you have a problem with the phrase "unplugged", there's nothing I can do to argue against it. It's a commonly used phrase in regards to social media, cell phones, etc. And if you don't like it, it's your prerogative. I disagree. I believe it's a helpful descriptor of the concept.

    2. I, again, did not say I support "unplugged" weddings. I simply said I could understand why someone would think of it in the first place. I understand how the concept came about. Not agreeing with it's implementation. (Which I clearly stated). 

    3. Your new favorite word must be idiotic. And I'm sorry you're having a bad Friday. But it's a study. Take it as you will. I know that I personally tend to be less "present" when I have my phone or camera. Simply because I'm focusing too much on getting the perfect shot/angle/lighting, that I sometimes forget to enjoy the moment. 

    4. I agree. I love taking pictures at weddings. Again, I never said I didn't agree. I even said I hope people take plenty of pictures during my wedding. 

    5. I think this is addressed towards other comments made, since I never brought this up. But, if you're wondering what I think (which I'm sure you're not), I'm not concerned about photographers getting the shots. I just assume they will do it. 

    And as always with the world, people are very emotionally attached to their opinions and tend to fly off the handle instead of attempting to understand what is being said. 
    I'm not being defensive at all- stupidity just really irritates me. 

    And I mean the stupidity of "unplugged" ceremonies, not specifically what you wrote; I think you are taking my post personally when I was actually just using it as a jumping off point for my comments.

    I also wasn't flying off the handle- this is just my posting style with topics that are stupid and irritate me, such as controlling brides trying to have "unplugged" ceremonies.  I'm snarky and I like to swear :-)

    And I'm having a great Friday, actually! Yay, fall!!

    "Love is the one thing we're capable of perceiving that transcends time and space."


    RedSolo34kimmiinthemittenDrillSergeantCat
  • JFC. 

    If I was to get a nastygram from this couple I'd send them a card back that said #byefelicia and end my friendship with them immediately.

    I don't think the trend is that stupid. It's a reaction to a behavior that people should really know better than to do. And I don't think it's about needing all of the attention because if you're the couple getting married then that should be a given. I think it's more about how technology has turned the general population into a "pics or it didn't happen" society. Even to the point that people rush to share other people's moments (weddings/engagements/births/etc.) instead of just their own. 

    If I see a wedding hashtag, then that's my cue that it's okay to take/share pictures and videos. And even then, I don't do it during the ceremony. But everyone isn't that observant, I guess.

    There's no way to do the unplugged ceremony thing without coming off rude so I'm not condoning it. And the follow through can be flaky when you try to do it (like you said in your example). But I do understand how the trend came to be.
    I agree. I can completely understand why someone would want an unplugged wedding. There's something about having a phone out that makes a person not as "present". I've read some studies that looked at a tour group where half took pictures, and the other half didn't. At the end, the people who didn't take pictures could recall more details and reported that they enjoyed the tour more than those who were taking pictures. 

    Side Note: My above statement affects the guests' experience more than it affects me. Therefore, I really don't care if they use their phones. I'm hoping they do take pictures so I can see them too! 

    Edit: Also, want to clarify that just because a study says some people have a particular experience, does not mean that everyone does. Clearly this post is not meant to imply that someone who takes photos lives some vapid, undesirable life. It's simply to point out that some people may be distracted by the use of phones/cameras and that could be a valid reason to choose to "unplug" yourself. Notice, I said unplug yourself.. not unplug others. 

    No, it's a stupid trend.

    1st of all, cell phones are mobile phones and therefore NOT plugged in by their very nature, so it's an idiotic phrase to use.

    2nd, it's fucking controlling, period.  Before cell phones existed people had and used regular old cameras.  I don't recall anyone trying to enforce no camera weddings.

    3rd, the concept of "presence"is idiotic as well.  If you are taking a picture of a subject, your entire focus or presence is actually focused on that subject.  So people taking photos during a wedding are actually more "present" then those that are not. . . who are likely day dreaming, looking around at the surroundings, watching other guests, whispering to ppl they are sitting with, etc.

    4th, the reason ppl are taking pictures is because they want those pictures as a memento of your wedding.  NO ONE ELSE is going to pay for the overpriced prints your photographer is selling.  You as the couple paid for your pictures, but your guests are not going to.

    5th, it's your photographers JOB to get the shots he/she needs w/o having guests, wedding staff, decor, etc. blocking or interfering the shots.  It's what you are paying him/her to be doing.

    As always with Reddit, the rational ppl are downvoted to oblivion by the Validation Squad.
    Wow. You're a bit defensive about this topic. 

    1. If you have a problem with the phrase "unplugged", there's nothing I can do to argue against it. It's a commonly used phrase in regards to social media, cell phones, etc. And if you don't like it, it's your prerogative. I disagree. I believe it's a helpful descriptor of the concept.

    2. I, again, did not say I support "unplugged" weddings. I simply said I could understand why someone would think of it in the first place. I understand how the concept came about. Not agreeing with it's implementation. (Which I clearly stated). 

    3. Your new favorite word must be idiotic. And I'm sorry you're having a bad Friday. But it's a study. Take it as you will. I know that I personally tend to be less "present" when I have my phone or camera. Simply because I'm focusing too much on getting the perfect shot/angle/lighting, that I sometimes forget to enjoy the moment. 

    4. I agree. I love taking pictures at weddings. Again, I never said I didn't agree. I even said I hope people take plenty of pictures during my wedding. 

    5. I think this is addressed towards other comments made, since I never brought this up. But, if you're wondering what I think (which I'm sure you're not), I'm not concerned about photographers getting the shots. I just assume they will do it. 

    And as always with the world, people are very emotionally attached to their opinions and tend to fly off the handle instead of attempting to understand what is being said. 
    I'm not being defensive at all- stupidity just really irritates me. 

    And I mean the stupidity of "unplugged" ceremonies, not specifically what you wrote; I think you are taking my post personally when I was actually just using it as a jumping off point for my comments.

    I also wasn't flying off the handle- this is just my posting style with topics that are stupid and irritate me, such as controlling brides trying to have "unplugged" ceremonies.  I'm snarky and I like to swear :-)

    And I'm having a great Friday, actually! Yay, fall!!
    Haha, alright. My bad. I did think you were specifically responding to my comments. 

    And I agree, Yay Fall!!! <3
  • You can never force anyone to be mentally/emotionally "present" with you (whatever the hell that means anyway.)  You can ask them to join you physically, but what goes on between their ears is utterly and completely beyond your control.  

    Perhaps one guest is sitting there in rapt attention, hanging on every word and movement.  Perhaps another is regretting how much they drank last night. Perhaps another is watching the clock wondering how much longer this thing is going to go on.  Perhaps another is thinking back fondly on their own wedding. Perhaps another is seriously wishing they had used the restroom before being seated.  Perhaps another is browsing facebook.  Perhaps another is feeling sad that they are single.  Perhaps another is having sexual fantasies of joining the bride and/or groom on the wedding night.  Perhaps another is alternating between re-reading the program and counting ceiling tiles.  Perhaps another is snapping a million photos and not really paying attention to the content. Perhaps another is snapping a million photos and also sitting there in rapt attention, hanging on every word and movement.

    Each individual guest is going to be as engaged in what is going on with the bride and groom as he or she chooses to be, regardless of how anyone tries to police their thoughts.  Our thoughts are our own private space, and nothing you can do will change that.
    Well said. 100% agree. This is why the reasoning (that I assume some people may rely on to validate their decision) behind an unplugged ceremony doesn't work in practice. 
  • YogaSandyYogaSandy
    Third Anniversary 100 Comments 100 Love Its Name Dropper
    member
    edited September 2016
    You can never force anyone to be mentally/emotionally "present" with you (whatever the hell that means anyway.)  You can ask them to join you physically, but what goes on between their ears is utterly and completely beyond your control.  

    Perhaps one guest is sitting there in rapt attention, hanging on every word and movement.  Perhaps another is regretting how much they drank last night. Perhaps another is watching the clock wondering how much longer this thing is going to go on.  Perhaps another is thinking back fondly on their own wedding. Perhaps another is seriously wishing they had used the restroom before being seated.  Perhaps another is browsing facebook.  Perhaps another is feeling sad that they are single.  Perhaps another is having sexual fantasies of joining the bride and/or groom on the wedding night.  Perhaps another is alternating between re-reading the program and counting ceiling tiles.  Perhaps another is snapping a million photos and not really paying attention to the content. Perhaps another is snapping a million photos and also sitting there in rapt attention, hanging on every word and movement.

    Each individual guest is going to be as engaged in what is going on with the bride and groom as he or she chooses to be, regardless of how anyone tries to police their thoughts.  Our thoughts are our own private space, and nothing you can do will change that.
    Well said. 100% agree. This is why the reasoning (that I assume some people may rely on to validate their decision) behind an unplugged ceremony doesn't work in practice. 
    I've said this before. I'm a yoga teacher. The entire (well, most, maybe not entire) philosophy of yoga is to be present. There are so many times in my life when I'm not present, even though I teach other people how to be present in their lives. Even if you could force people to be present, it's not your place to do so.  My philosophy is not necessarily what is best for someone else's life. Thinking it is is very egocentric of me. 

    People have been "not present" or "not in the moment" long before cell phones. They will continue long after technology changes. I don't think I can top the above examples of ways people not on phones might not be present.
    SaintPaulGalkimmiinthemittenPrettyGirlLost
  • WTH? I'm just adding a new comment. So in my last comment, I originally typed a story about DH giving my brother a lot of edited pics the day after the wedding. Yay. They loved them. Then that part of the comment disappeared. Then I ETA that hahah I had a question about what if a tech fail happen and inregards to your photographer's pics? Coincidentally, I just showed tech fails can happen. Then that story disappeared. See. Tech fail again. 
    InLoveInQueens
  • You can never force anyone to be mentally/emotionally "present" with you (whatever the hell that means anyway.)  You can ask them to join you physically, but what goes on between their ears is utterly and completely beyond your control.  

    Perhaps one guest is sitting there in rapt attention, hanging on every word and movement.  Perhaps another is regretting how much they drank last night. Perhaps another is watching the clock wondering how much longer this thing is going to go on.  Perhaps another is thinking back fondly on their own wedding. Perhaps another is seriously wishing they had used the restroom before being seated.  Perhaps another is browsing facebook.  Perhaps another is feeling sad that they are single.  Perhaps another is having sexual fantasies of joining the bride and/or groom on the wedding night.  Perhaps another is alternating between re-reading the program and counting ceiling tiles.  Perhaps another is snapping a million photos and not really paying attention to the content. Perhaps another is snapping a million photos and also sitting there in rapt attention, hanging on every word and movement.

    Each individual guest is going to be as engaged in what is going on with the bride and groom as he or she chooses to be, regardless of how anyone tries to police their thoughts.  Our thoughts are our own private space, and nothing you can do will change that.
    Lol that's the first time I've ever heard that excuse to not be "present" at a wedding. 
    OurWildKingdomlyndausvisparklepants41cowgirl8238
  • banana468 said:
    If you're this uptight about the way a photo looks good luck in marriage.



    Can you imagine the he** this woman will have/be if she has kids?!?!?   Because we all know kids are perfect little robots.. 
    Baby Birthday Ticker Ticker Baby Birthday Ticker Ticker
    InLoveInQueens
  • DrillSergeantCatDrillSergeantCat Oklahoma City, OK
    2500 Comments 500 Love Its Third Anniversary First Answer
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    I had zero idea that anyone had their phones out because I was so focused on my man at the end of the aisle. This bridezilla is going to alienate a bunch of people if she sends this stupid note she's thinking of sending. And what will it accomplish? Nothing other than to make the reader feel bad. It's not going to change her photos. 
    wmam35InLoveInQueens
  • I only read the post and not any of the comments but I have to wonder; if Amy had hired experienced photographers instead of 23 y/o friends from college maybe they would have edited out the cell phones.

    I know (from following my photographer on social media) that he takes time to edit himself out of reflections in shots and cropping out cell phones.
    Yeah I haven't read the Reddit thread but if the majority of the photos had cell phones in them I'd be mad at myself for hiring a bad photographer.

    Sounds like this bride cheaped out and expected her guests make the photographer's job easier, and now she's taking out her frustration on the wrong people.

    PrettyGirlLost
  • I only read the post and not any of the comments but I have to wonder; if Amy had hired experienced photographers instead of 23 y/o friends from college maybe they would have edited out the cell phones.

    I know (from following my photographer on social media) that he takes time to edit himself out of reflections in shots and cropping out cell phones.
    Yeah I haven't read the Reddit thread but if the majority of the photos had cell phones in them I'd be mad at myself for hiring a bad photographer.

    Sounds like this bride cheaped out and expected her guests make the photographer's job easier, and now she's taking out her frustration on the wrong people.


    SITB

    She actually got all the shots she wanted, no phones or anything. But she required the photographers to send her every picture and when she saw the ones every pro would throw in the garbage because they weren't framed right or there were phones in the picture that's when she came up with her master plan to shame these people for disobeying her. Shes just looking for a reason to be pissy. 
    DrillSergeantCatPrettyGirlLostknottie9fb034263c3540ec
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