Music

Catholic Music Wedding - Non-Secular music?

My fiance and I have decided to get married in the Catholic Church, as both of our families are very involved and we both are confirmed. Although we are very excited for a beautiful and meaningful ceremony, I am really struggling with the idea that I may not have much say in my processional song.

We plan to use Catholic music for all parts of the wedding except for when I walk down the aisle, when I want to have my close friend (a classically trained pianist) play "A Thousand Years" instrumentally. This is something I have wanted for a couple years and am having trouble letting go of.

Has anybody has success in getting non-secular music for small pieces of their ceremonies?

Re: Catholic Music Wedding - Non-Secular music?

  • That may be allowed as a part of the prelude music, but you'll need to talk with the parish music director to see what will be deemed appropriate and when.
    OurWildKingdomMesmrEwe
  • This isn't really something we can help with. You might be able to talk your parish music director into it, but unlikely and you won't know unless you talk to them. What about using it as your first dance song instead?
    OurWildKingdom
  • There's not much we can do.   This is about your parish and their rules.   

    Remember, this isn't just a meaningful ceremony if you're Catholic,  this is a Sacrament and most likely a Mass.   
    MesmrEwe
  • My fiance and I have decided to get married in the Catholic Church, as both of our families are very involved and we both are confirmed. Although we are very excited for a beautiful and meaningful ceremony, I am really struggling with the idea that I may not have much say in my processional song.

    We plan to use Catholic music for all parts of the wedding except for when I walk down the aisle, when I want to have my close friend (a classically trained pianist) play "A Thousand Years" instrumentally. This is something I have wanted for a couple years and am having trouble letting go of.

    Has anybody has success in getting non-secular music for small pieces of their ceremonies?
    Catholic music?  What is this?  Does it mean the composer has to have been a Catholic?  If so, that eliminates Bach, Handel, and a lot of classical composers.  I do not know of any music that is restricted to the Catholic church, though much music is prohibited in it.
    httpiimgurcomTCCjW0wjpg
  • CMGragain said:
    My fiance and I have decided to get married in the Catholic Church, as both of our families are very involved and we both are confirmed. Although we are very excited for a beautiful and meaningful ceremony, I am really struggling with the idea that I may not have much say in my processional song.

    We plan to use Catholic music for all parts of the wedding except for when I walk down the aisle, when I want to have my close friend (a classically trained pianist) play "A Thousand Years" instrumentally. This is something I have wanted for a couple years and am having trouble letting go of.

    Has anybody has success in getting non-secular music for small pieces of their ceremonies?
    Catholic music?  What is this?  Does it mean the composer has to have been a Catholic?  If so, that eliminates Bach, Handel, and a lot of classical composers.  I do not know of any music that is restricted to the Catholic church, though much music is prohibited in it.
    Oh c'mon. You know she's just referring to church music. Not everyone is as much a scholar of it as you. 
    justsieredoryx
  • My parish's music director and I were in touch a few weeks before my wedding (in a Catholic church) to discuss the songs my H and I had in mind.  We were short a song (I think for communion) and she actually suggested a secular song that she said is very popular at weddings.  The other songs were hymns.  Your best bet is contacting the music director at your church to discuss what you posted here (and check to see if you friend the pianist is even permitted to play...my cousin had a friend with a great singing voice that her church's music director wouldn't permit in the choir loft). 
    Some music directors/parishes are more strict than others, you won't know who you're dealing with until you reach out.  Good luck.
    CMGragainOurWildKingdom
  • CMGragainCMGragain
    10000 Comments 500 Love Its Third Anniversary 25 Answers
    member
    edited November 2016
    My fiance and I have decided to get married in the Catholic Church, as both of our families are very involved and we both are confirmed. Although we are very excited for a beautiful and meaningful ceremony, I am really struggling with the idea that I may not have much say in my processional song.

    We plan to use Catholic music for all parts of the wedding except for when I walk down the aisle, when I want to have my close friend (a classically trained pianist) play "A Thousand Years" instrumentally. This is something I have wanted for a couple years and am having trouble letting go of.

    Has anybody has success in getting non-secular music for small pieces of their ceremonies?
    OP, did you really mean this?  Non-secular music is religious music.
    Secular music is not religious music.  Some Catholic churches often have additional rules that prohibit certain religious music, and it must be liturgical.  It was supposed to have changed at Vatican II, but there are still some old style churches.  This is not universally enforced, so talk to your music director.
    httpiimgurcomTCCjW0wjpg
    LadyCatherineDB
  • CMGragain said:
    My fiance and I have decided to get married in the Catholic Church, as both of our families are very involved and we both are confirmed. Although we are very excited for a beautiful and meaningful ceremony, I am really struggling with the idea that I may not have much say in my processional song.

    We plan to use Catholic music for all parts of the wedding except for when I walk down the aisle, when I want to have my close friend (a classically trained pianist) play "A Thousand Years" instrumentally. This is something I have wanted for a couple years and am having trouble letting go of.

    Has anybody has success in getting non-secular music for small pieces of their ceremonies?
    Catholic music?  What is this?  Does it mean the composer has to have been a Catholic?  If so, that eliminates Bach, Handel, and a lot of classical composers.  I do not know of any music that is restricted to the Catholic church, though much music is prohibited in it.
    Oh c'mon. You know she's just referring to church music. Not everyone is as much a scholar of it as you. 
    No, I don't know this.  Her post was very confusing to this old church organist.  I once worked in a strict Baptist church where I was told to not play any music that was used in the Catholic church.  (How ignorant!)  I responded that they might as well dispense with my services and throw out their Hymnal.
    httpiimgurcomTCCjW0wjpg
  • MobKazMobKaz Chicago suburbs
    5000 Comments Seventh Anniversary 500 Love Its 5 Answers
    member
    eileenrob said:
    My parish's music director and I were in touch a few weeks before my wedding (in a Catholic church) to discuss the songs my H and I had in mind.  We were short a song (I think for communion) and she actually suggested a secular song that she said is very popular at weddings.  The other songs were hymns.  Your best bet is contacting the music director at your church to discuss what you posted here (and check to see if you friend the pianist is even permitted to play...my cousin had a friend with a great singing voice that her church's music director wouldn't permit in the choir loft). 
    Some music directors/parishes are more strict than others, you won't know who you're dealing with until you reach out.  Good luck.
    Every parish is different, so DO ask your music minister.  I had a secular song during my Nuptial Mass, and that was 38 years ago.  It was from West Side Story.  I still recommend it to brides today; One Hand, One Heart.
    eileenrobCMGragainernursejOurWildKingdom
  • MobKaz said:
    eileenrob said:
    My parish's music director and I were in touch a few weeks before my wedding (in a Catholic church) to discuss the songs my H and I had in mind.  We were short a song (I think for communion) and she actually suggested a secular song that she said is very popular at weddings.  The other songs were hymns.  Your best bet is contacting the music director at your church to discuss what you posted here (and check to see if you friend the pianist is even permitted to play...my cousin had a friend with a great singing voice that her church's music director wouldn't permit in the choir loft). 
    Some music directors/parishes are more strict than others, you won't know who you're dealing with until you reach out.  Good luck.
    Every parish is different, so DO ask your music minister.  I had a secular song during my Nuptial Mass, and that was 38 years ago.  It was from West Side Story.  I still recommend it to brides today; One Hand, One Heart.
    The song my music director recommended was One Hand One Heart! :) 
    MobKazernursejOurWildKingdom
  • CMGragain said:
    My fiance and I have decided to get married in the Catholic Church, as both of our families are very involved and we both are confirmed. Although we are very excited for a beautiful and meaningful ceremony, I am really struggling with the idea that I may not have much say in my processional song.

    We plan to use Catholic music for all parts of the wedding except for when I walk down the aisle, when I want to have my close friend (a classically trained pianist) play "A Thousand Years" instrumentally. This is something I have wanted for a couple years and am having trouble letting go of.

    Has anybody has success in getting non-secular music for small pieces of their ceremonies?
    OP, did you really mean this?  Non-secular music is religious music.
    Secular music is not religious music.  Some Catholic churches often have additional rules that prohibit certain religious music, and it must be liturgical.  It was supposed to have changed at Vatican II, but there are still some old style churches.  This is not universally enforced, so talk to your music director.
    @CMGragain, if you'd like to speak as a non-Catholic expert on Roman Catholic liturgy, I'd suggest that you read and study this document first since it is the published norm for the liturgy. Once you've done that, then come back and tell us Catholics how things are supposed to be done.

    http://www.usccb.org/prayer-and-worship/the-mass/general-instruction-of-the-roman-missal/index.cfm

  • CMGragainCMGragain
    10000 Comments 500 Love Its Third Anniversary 25 Answers
    member
    edited November 2016
    geebee908 said:
    @CMGragain, if you'd like to speak as a non-Catholic expert on Roman Catholic liturgy, I'd suggest that you read and study this document first since it is the published norm for the liturgy. Once you've done that, then come back and tell us Catholics how things are supposed to be done.

    http://www.usccb.org/prayer-and-worship/the-mass/general-instruction-of-the-roman-missal/index.cfm

    I worked as a church organist for 28 years, and have played for many Catholic Masses and weddings.  Thanks, anyway.  Just because I am not Catholic, doesn't mean that I don't get it.  The current organist in my own Methodist church is a Seventh Day Adventist,  She gets us, too.
    httpiimgurcomTCCjW0wjpg
  • flantasticflantastic The Midwest
    1000 Comments 500 Love Its Fourth Anniversary 5 Answers
    member
    edited November 2016
    CMGragain said:
    geebee908 said:
    @CMGragain, if you'd like to speak as a non-Catholic expert on Roman Catholic liturgy, I'd suggest that you read and study this document first since it is the published norm for the liturgy. Once you've done that, then come back and tell us Catholics how things are supposed to be done.

    http://www.usccb.org/prayer-and-worship/the-mass/general-instruction-of-the-roman-missal/index.cfm

    I worked as a church organist for 28 years, and have played for many Catholic Masses and weddings.  Thanks, anyway.  Just because I am not Catholic, doesn't mean that I don't get it.  The current organist in my own Methodist church is a Seventh Day Adventist,  She gets us, too.
    But you don't get it. What you said about the supposed change to the necessity of sacred music at Vatican II is at worst inaccurate, and at best confusing and vague and probably inaccurate (depending on what you meant by your lost antecedent, or the word "liturgical"). There can be some discernment by local parishes about what is considered "sacred" vs. "profane," but the requirement that it not be in any way "profane," especially during the liturgy itself or the processional preceding it, was not at all changed.

    Anniversary

  • flantasticflantastic The Midwest
    1000 Comments 500 Love Its Fourth Anniversary 5 Answers
    member
    edited November 2016
    OP, there is plenty of beautiful music out there that can be appropriate for the liturgy. I work for the Catholic Church and so was kind of nerdy about my sacred music choices, but I just took the time to troll YouTube for awesome arrangements of different hymns (and the one we used for the bridal entrance was just an elaborate organ version of the song we then continued with lyrics as the opening song, because in my experience trying to do a separate opening song after the processional is just stilted and awkward). Have fun with it, and find some gorgeous music.

    Steven Warner has some songs you might like, if you like the instrumental Thousand Years. 

    Anniversary

  • CMGragain said:
    geebee908 said:
    @CMGragain, if you'd like to speak as a non-Catholic expert on Roman Catholic liturgy, I'd suggest that you read and study this document first since it is the published norm for the liturgy. Once you've done that, then come back and tell us Catholics how things are supposed to be done.

    http://www.usccb.org/prayer-and-worship/the-mass/general-instruction-of-the-roman-missal/index.cfm

    I worked as a church organist for 28 years, and have played for many Catholic Masses and weddings.  Thanks, anyway.  Just because I am not Catholic, doesn't mean that I don't get it.  The current organist in my own Methodist church is a Seventh Day Adventist,  She gets us, too.
    My point was that you don't know what the music is supposed to be unless you've studied the liturgical documents and understand the theology behind them. You want to pass yourself off as an expert because you've played the organ at Catholic weddings and Masses where you likely were told what music to play. You don't get it if you can be that arrogant in your thinking.
    justsieflantasticredoryx
  • Well, my organ teacher was a Catholic priest, and my theory professor was a former Benedictine monk.  I figured that they were qualified to teach me the ins and outs.
    httpiimgurcomTCCjW0wjpg
  • So they had you read the General Instruction of the Roman Missal and the Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy and gave you the theology to go with them during your music lessons? Impressive.

    You know that this sounds like someone who says they're an expert on (pick a culture) because they know people from that culture.
    redoryx
  • My sister was married in a Catholic Church with the full mass (I'm not Catholic but she converted) and her music director allowed them to pick songs and play the instrumental version with their own musician as long as the original song  had words and themes that aligned with the Catholic Church beliefs. I can't remember what she picked but they were able to use some country song that she loved that had a theme about love etc. I think every church is different and you need to explore with your own ceremony site.
    OurWildKingdom
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