Ceremony and Vow Ideas

Dog Ring Bearer/procession ideas (y'all are my sounding board)

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Re: Dog Ring Bearer/procession ideas (y'all are my sounding board)

  • MCmeowMCmeow
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    edited June 11
    It depends on the dog, some can be unpredictable. We had our dog as the ring bearer and had my brother (the usher) walk him down. It worked out well because we hired a dog sitter in the neighborhood to take him right after (at the alter there's a side entry guests can't see, the dog sitter waited there to take our dog). It ended up pretty seamless and perfect mostly because we came up with every backup plan in the book, including not having him as ring bearer if he wasn't behaving that day.
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  • levioosa said:

    Things don't make sense here. True service dogs are trained to handle stressful situations and crowds. But OP mentions that her dog gets "nervous" and she joked about needing to hold him, which makes me think he might be one of those small dogs that people say are service animals so they can bring them places, but completely lack the formal training.  



    Small dogs also tend to be kinda yappy.
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  • justsiejustsie
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    levioosa said:

    Things don't make sense here. True service dogs are trained to handle stressful situations and crowds. But OP mentions that her dog gets "nervous" and she joked about needing to hold him, which makes me think he might be one of those small dogs that people say are service animals so they can bring them places, but completely lack the formal training.  


    I felt the same way. As someone with a trained therapy dog (NOT a service dog) I see this too often and it hurts my heart. 
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  • kaos16kaos16
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    levioosa said:

    Things don't make sense here. True service dogs are trained to handle stressful situations and crowds. But OP mentions that her dog gets "nervous" and she joked about needing to hold him, which makes me think he might be one of those small dogs that people say are service animals so they can bring them places, but completely lack the formal training.  



    Especially where OP said she trained him herself.  Perhaps OP didn't like the responses and wants us to feel bad by now saying it's a service animal??


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  • justsiejustsie
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    kaos16 said:



    levioosa said:


    Things don't make sense here. True service dogs are trained to handle stressful situations and crowds. But OP mentions that her dog gets "nervous" and she joked about needing to hold him, which makes me think he might be one of those small dogs that people say are service animals so they can bring them places, but completely lack the formal training.  





    Especially where OP said she trained him herself.  Perhaps OP didn't like the responses and wants us to feel bad by now saying it's a service animal??



    I've known a few people who have trained their own "service dogs", but typically it was because the reason behind having a service dog was not strong enough reason to put the person on a receiving end of a service dog. Doesn't mean that the person didn't benefit from having one, but "the powers that be" that determine that didn't feel it was justified. 
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  • kaos16kaos16
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    justsie said:



    kaos16 said:





    levioosa said:



    Things don't make sense here. True service dogs are trained to handle stressful situations and crowds. But OP mentions that her dog gets "nervous" and she joked about needing to hold him, which makes me think he might be one of those small dogs that people say are service animals so they can bring them places, but completely lack the formal training.  







    Especially where OP said she trained him herself.  Perhaps OP didn't like the responses and wants us to feel bad by now saying it's a service animal??




    I've known a few people who have trained their own "service dogs", but typically it was because the reason behind having a service dog was not strong enough reason to put the person on a receiving end of a service dog. Doesn't mean that the person didn't benefit from having one, but "the powers that be" that determine that didn't feel it was justified. 



    That could also be the case. . . . I have no idea. 
    justsie
  • I am also having my dog in my wedding. Me and FI got our dog together so she is defiantly a joint baby, but she usually responds better to me giving her commands  (she is special needs and hears my pitch in her one good ear better than his). The plan is that he is going to walk her down the aisle with him first and then I will walk the aisle last like most weddings. But if she is being clingy that day she will walk with me instead (or not at all if she doesn't seem to want to).  Is your dad walking you down the aisle?  If not have your dog walk with you.  

    Ways that my wedding sounds different than yours: my wedding is at home, very much in her space. My weddings is also only 25 people all of whom my dog is familiar with, and they know of her needs.  We are also only using dog friendly toss stuff for when walk back up the aisle as a family (just an idea if you or anyone else with furbabies hasn't thought of that). My wedding is also outside and she will be attached to a 15ft long leash so if she wants to walk around to visit people she can or she can sit at our feet like usual.  She will also have the option of staying inside if she doesn't seem to want to play. 
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