Invites and Paper

Invitation Wording Non Traditional

Both of us are NOT wanting a stiff,traditional invitation so I am writing it.  Stuck on how to word it with both of us paying for it while being ourselves in the wording?  It's going to be held overlooking a lake that looks as it came from a Fairytale.

Re: Invitation Wording Non Traditional

  • This would probably go better on the invites and paper boards. There is a sticky at the top of that board that is a great reference. 

      knottieafc578b999766e15 said:


    Both of us are NOT wanting a stiff,traditional invitation so I am writing it.  Stuck on how to word it with both of us paying for it while being ourselves in the wording?  It's going to be held overlooking a lake that looks as it came from a Fairytale.



    The purpose of an invitation is to communicate Who, What, Where, When, and Why. 
    Traditional wording is not stuffy but clear and to the point. Sometimes when people play around with the wording too much the intent gets lost or is confusing. 

    For couples hosting their wedding (the invite lists who is hosting, aka the point of contact for the invitee, not who is paying.) wording like "the pleasure of your company is requested..." or "together with their families..." is normal. 
    Heffalumpshort+sassyahoywedding
  • levioosalevioosa Southern California
    2500 Comments 500 Love Its Third Anniversary 5 Answers
    member
    edited June 16




    Both of us are NOT wanting a stiff,traditional invitation so I am writing it.  Stuck on how to word it with both of us paying for it while being ourselves in the wording?  It's going to be held overlooking a lake that looks as it came from a Fairytale.




    I'm honestly a little confused. Invites do not indicate who is paying for the event. They are constructed to indicate important points ( who, when, where) succinctly. @CMGragain has great wording for invites that is appropriate. 

    Also, the "fairy-tale" part of it really doesn't  have a place here. Your invitations are meant to indicate the formality of the event.

    Eta: phone posting cut me off.  


    image
    Heffalump
  • Honestly, I don't see how traditional wording wouldn't allow you to be yourselves.  It tells guests what is happening, where, when, and to whom to reply.  Pretty straightforward. 

    Agree with PP that Invites and Paper would be a great resource here:
    https://forums.theknot.com/categories/wedding-boards_invites-paper

    The sticky specifically dealing with wording is here:
    https://forums.theknot.com/discussion/1044338/how-to-word-your-wedding-invitation#latest

    If that doesn't address your questions, then feel free to start a new post there.  Optionally, you can tag @CMGragain, but even if you don't, a) she usually turns up at least every few days, and b) other posters can also help.

    My only word of caution here is not to overthink it.  Guests appreciate clear, concise information.  We see tons of posts from guests saying "What on earth does ___________ mean?  What am I supposed to do?"  Don't put your guests in this position by going overly creative on your invite wording.  Save the creativity and individuality for other aspects of your wedding like the menu, flowers, decorations, etc.
    charlotte989875
  • Also, feel free to post your proposed wording on I&P if you'd like feedback.
  • Agree with PPs about sticking to the basics (Who, What, Where, When). You can also express yourself and be creative with the design/coloring/paper if that better reflects what you're going for. Just keep in mind people take cues from the invitations about the formality of the event so stay clear of fancy invites with heavy cardstock or engraving if you're having a casual wedding (and vice versa). 
    Heffalumpshort+sassy
  • You would just use neutral wording:

    The honor of your presence (if in a church) / The pleasure of your company (if not in a church)
    is requested at the marriage of 
    (Bride/Groom #1)
    and
    (Bride/Groom #2)
    Saturday, the first of July
    at half after four o'clock
    (Venue Name)
    (Venue Street Address)
    (City, State)

    If you want to incorporate fairy tale elements, pick a design that has those elements. Don't mess with the wording - the wording is very simply to explain the who, what, when, where. Get creative with your stationary, decor, menu, music, flowers, etc. Here are some examples of stationary you could use: 

    http://www.vistaprint.com/studio.aspx?template=218609_A42&ag=True&xnav=HSG_Design_Image&rd=1
    http://www.vistaprint.com/studio.aspx?template=218351_A42&ag=True&xnav=HSG_Design_Image&rd=1
    https://www.weddingpaperdivas.com/product/14589/signature_white_wedding_invitations_fairy_tale_romance.html
    https://www.zazzle.com/beauty_and_the_beast_fairy_tale_castle_wedding_card-256871449953487849
    https://www.zazzle.com/fairy_tale_storybook_wedding_invitations-161494500520471037

    I have to say though, is your SO as excited about a fairy tale wedding theme as you are? Remember, it's his/her wedding too...
    *********************************************************************************

    image
    ILoveBeachMusicCMGragain
  • Jen4948Jen4948 Houston
    10000 Comments Fifth Anniversary 500 Love Its 5 Answers
    member
    As PPs all note, your invitation is not a playbill. It is meant to indicate the basics: What, Who, When, Where, and that's what the standard wording does. Departures from it can leave guests confused, so we don't advise "creative" wording.

    The purpose of the invitation is not to "honor" anyone listed on it (the persons "honored" by invitations are the recipients) or to indicate who's paying, which is none of the guests' business.
    CMGragain
  • CMGragainCMGragain
    10000 Comments 500 Love Its Third Anniversary 25 Answers
    member
    edited June 16
    OP, I will be happy to help you with wording.  Just post your wording, and we will check it to make sure it is etiquette acceptable.  You do not have to use traditional wording, but it is important that your wording has the necessary information for your guests.  Usually non-traditional wording is longer than traditional wording.
    Here is an example of non-traditional wording that does the job without being overly sentimental or wordy:

    You are invited to the wedding of
    Bride's Name
    and
    Groom's Name
    August 12, 2017
    at 6:00 PM
    Venue Name
    Address
    City, State (no zip code)

    Here is the traditional wording:

    The pleasure of your company is requested
    at the marriage of
    Bride's Full Name
    and
    Groom's Full Name
    Saturday, the date of August
    two thousand seventeen
    at six o'clock
    Venue Name
    Address
    City, State

    I would caution you about carrying your fairytale theme too far.  No phony titles, please!  This insults people who actually have hereditary titles.  You can put poetry on your invitation if you insist, but many people think this is eyeroll worthy, and inappropriate.  Your invitation tells your guests who, what, when and where - not why!  I like @southernbelle0915 's suggestion about using fairy tale related designs for your invitation.  The wording on that last example she posted is in terrible taste, though!  Ew!!!  Icky-poo!!!  Don't do that.
    httpiimgurcomTCCjW0wjpg
    InLoveInQueens
  • edited June 18
    Didn't mean to confuse everyone.  I have been so confused on the types of wording that my words came out wrong.  My FH and I are hosting the wedding and I needed help wording the invitations so they didn't sound foolish or over the top.  We are both Prior military and that is where the confusion on wording comes into play.   Here is what i have so far:

    ____________________________
    and
    ______________________________

    Ask for the pleasure of your Companionship
    as we join our hearts
    on July 22,2017
    at
    The Carriage House Inn,
    Harrison,Michigan
    2 O'Clock PM


    Church attire        Reception to follow
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