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Customs and Traditions

Fisherman Knot Tying Origins

So, I was doing a little research on handfasting. At first I thought it sounded really neat, then discovered it's Pagan background. As a Christian I don't like the idea of that. I also didn't like the idea of it being a trial period of sorts. 

While looking it up, though, I came across the Fisherman Knot tying. I have yet to find its origin. If anyone could direct me somewhere or just tell me, I would greatly appreciate it. :)

Re: Fisherman Knot Tying Origins

  • I'm not familiar with this.

    I know this isn't what you're asking either, but for what it's worth, there are more Christian rituals, traditions, and holidays that are based on or evolved from pagan traditions than you probably realize. Many Christian marriage ceremonies also incorporate an element of handfasting when the priest wraps the couple's hands in his stole and blesses them. So if you like the idea of handfasting as symbolizing your marriage, I would include it if I were you.
  • Isnt't the fisherman's knot the tightest knot there is? I read/watched something somewhere where the fisherman's knot never unravelled and only got tighter as more stress was put on it (meaning that the more trials you go through in life will bring you and your mate even closer)
     Daisypath Anniversary tickers
  • In Response to Fisherman Knot Tying Origins:
    So, I was doing a little research on handfasting. At first I thought it sounded really neat, then discovered it's Pagan background. As a Christian I don't like the idea of that. I also didn't like the idea of it being a trial period of sorts.  While looking it up, though, I came across the Fisherman Knot tying. I have yet to find its origin. If anyone could direct me somewhere or just tell me, I would greatly appreciate it. :)
    Posted by BrandyB93
    I don't know anything about the fisherman knot tying, but I just wanted to let you know that many mainstream wedding traditions have pagan roots (the rings, the traditional vows, wedding cake, tossing rice, etc.), and just about everything associated with Christmas and Easter is pagan in origin, so you might want to rethink those, too.
  • edited January 2013
    I really don't mean to be an a$$, but as a Christian do you celebrate Christmas and Easter? Because both of those holidays also have pagan origins. The Christmas tree tradition is a pagan custom appropriated by Christians in Rome (who syncretized Saturnalia with Christmas), and rabbits and eggs have nothing to do with Jesus's crucifixion (Easter was syncretized with spring rites, hence the "springy" bunnies and eggs). FWIW, handfasting is done in Christian Orthodoxy. 
  • In Response to Fisherman Knot Tying Origins:
    So, I was doing a little research on handfasting. At first I thought it sounded really neat, then discovered it's Pagan background. As a Christian I don't like the idea of that. I also didn't like the idea of it being a trial period of sorts.  While looking it up, though, I came across the Fisherman Knot tying. I have yet to find its origin. If anyone could direct me somewhere or just tell me, I would greatly appreciate it. :)
    Posted by BrandyB93
    I have no clue about the Fisherman Knot tying, but I have learned a lot about handfasting since coming on these boards.  You're right, this ceremony is rooted in Pagan and Celtic traditions and there is a trial period associated with handfasting.  Those who take handfasting seriously incorporate the trial period.  Those who adopt mix/match traditions don't worry about it.  Those who are don't like the idea of non-Christian traditions being woven into a Christian ceremony generally skip it.

    Good luck!

  • Gaucho and Lisa stated it correctly--most of our wedding traditions incorporate older, pre-Christian traditions.  Where do you think the term "tying the knot" came from?  (And, most of the Christmas traditions came from the Pagan celebrations, too! Even the colors that are used, red and green, represent the god and goddess.)  I'm Pagan, and don't understand the Christian disinformation campaign, as a lot of Christians erroneously think that we worship the devil.  We can't worship something we don't believe in.   All that aside, you may want to check with your minister or whatever, some of them are misinformed, too, and will not allow Pagan traditions in their church.   IMHO, the fisherman's knot, like the "hand ceremony" of some Christian churches, is just a renaming, and bastardization of the older traditions to make them feel better about practicing the older beliefs. 
    image Don't mess with the old dogs; age and treachery will always overcome youth and skill! BS and brilliance only come with age and experience.
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