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Flooooooood

My hometown is finally getting national attention - meh, it's only taken roughly 17 years.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20100922/ap_on_re_us/us_monster_lake_3
panther

Re: Flooooooood

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    I just read that!  Have they considered building some sort of canal/drainage pipe to a river?

    P.S. don't send it south, we have enough water down here. Thank you very much  :)
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    pirategal03pirategal03 member
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    edited September 2010
    That before/now picture is crazy. 

    I'm always slightly baffled by natural lakes.  My first thought is "why don't they just let more water through the damn?"

    ETA: I know that doesn't apply. 
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    Holy crap.  Is everyone ok?
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    edited September 2010
    Well the canal/drainage thing is the whole problem.

    It's a SIMPLE SOLUTION.  Move the water out.  It goes down the Sheyenne River, into the Red River, and then North to Canada into Lake Winnipeg.  Except environmentalists have been stalling it for years because of the sulfates in the water, and the Canadians are freaking out because it breaches an old treaty and THEY don't like the water quality either.  Which is stupid, because as far as I know, Lake Winnipeg is disgusting.

    My dad is a farmer - a large farmer - but he has lost 2,000 acres.  He'll probably lose another 1,000 acres next year.  If the lake reaches its natural spill elevation, no farmer in the area will be in business.

    ETA - MFJ, okay, as in, alive, yes, but really - no one is safe.  And there aren't many people in that area that aren't affected by it.  It's been a slow growing cancerous nightmare.
    panther
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    I understand that its horrible to lose your family land and have to move, but I question the practicality of people who rebuild in those areas that flood often. 
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    In Response to <a href="http://forums.theknot.com/Sites/theknot/Pages/Main.aspx/wedding-boards_snarky-brides_flooooooood?plckFindPostKey=Cat:Wedding%20BoardsForum:17Discussion:d3db4d37-10da-4dcd-8b4b-cc665dd82d7fPost:c188dc69-3027-4ea8-9c8f-a5a0a24d5489">Re: Flooooooood</a>:
    [QUOTE]I understand that its horrible to lose your family land and have to move, but I question the practicality of people who rebuild in those areas that flood often. 
    Posted by SarahPLiz[/QUOTE]<div>
    </div><div>This.  On a semi-related note... why the fvck is the government funding the rebuilding of New Orleans?!</div><div>
    </div><div>AATB- this sucks.  My grandma is from ND and always talks about how different it is there now after all the flooding in the last, oh, 50 years.

    </div>
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    edited September 2010
    We hear that argument a lot Sarah but it's not a fair one.  When the town was built over a hundred years ago, they had no way of knowing that.  The lake has done this twice that they know of throughout history, possibly three to four times - and the last one was thousands of years ago.

    ETA - Steph I know!  My grandpa actually fought floods in the area his entire life.  Flooding was happening north of this lake where my family farmed, starting more than 70 years ago. 

    Now the main lake is connected to all the lakes up north.
    panther
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    2000+ acres? that's awful.
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    In Response to <a href="http://forums.theknot.com/Sites/theknot/Pages/Main.aspx/wedding-boards_snarky-brides_flooooooood?plckFindPostKey=Cat:Wedding%20BoardsForum:17Discussion:d3db4d37-10da-4dcd-8b4b-cc665dd82d7fPost:d9d89f55-c3b3-4344-9b91-87fb3d9b1c5f">Re: Flooooooood</a>:
    [QUOTE]We hear that argument a lot Sarah but it's not a fair one.  <strong>When the town was built over a hundred years ago, they had no way of knowing that</strong>.  The lake has done this twice that they know of throughout history, possibly three to four times - and the last one was thousands of years ago. ETA - Steph I know!  My grandpa actually fought floods in the area his entire life.  Flooding was happening north of this lake where my family farmed, starting more than 70 years ago.  Now the main lake is connected to all the lakes up north.
    Posted by AllAboutTheBenjamin[/QUOTE]

    <div>I know that, but to push nature off because you were there first is usually a losing battle, from a totally practical standpoint. I understand how horrible it is emotionally and economically, and I am not discounting that AT ALL. That was purely a practical observation I made when I lived in Houston during Tropical Storm Allison. Thousands of houses built on slabs flooded. People were warned that it could happen again soon. Those same people rebuilt their houses... on slabs instead of pier and beam, which would keep the foot of water our of your house. Biggest face palm ever on that one, especially when a few years later those same people were cleaning out their houses again after Ike. </div><div>
    </div><div>Steph, no amount of levees will keep NOLA from eroding into the gulf one day. I love the city, I really do, and it is one of the main economic centers of my home state, but it will inevitable be under water one day, because nature usually wins. </div>
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    Yeah, I understand that too Sarah - but it could all be fixed, really, if we could just get past the downstream opposition.  The lake would never flood again if it could properly flow out, and living there would not be a problem.

    The downstream communities don't really seem to understand the catastrophy that awaits if that lake starts flowing uncontrolled.
    panther
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    Ugh, what a craptastic situation.  Sorry to hear about your Dad's farm losing so much land over something that could be fixed.
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    They should just drain it :)

    I don't really know. I'm not exactly what you would call an environmentalist so I don't really have anything more to add to this conversation other than: that sucks! And I hope they can figure out a solution soon so your dad doesn't lose any more land.

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    I shouldn't have read any of the comments section on the article.

    Those people are idiots.
    panther
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    That's awful AATB, I hope all the parties involved can come to a usefull conclusion soon. :(

    My coworker and I had just read an article about this.
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    It's been so hard to be hopeful about this situation because for years and years, we went to meeting after meeting, summit after summit, hearing after hearing and listened to officials prattle on and on about how they were "working on solutions" and "negotiating" and "rallying for funding."  They just keep building up the roads and adding layers to the dike to protect the town while the rest of the water gets pushed out the other sides, flooding everyone else out. 

    There was recently a study done on the economic impact of the flooding, because people always argue that hunting and fishing make a large, positive impact.  But because of lost agricultural land for farming, the area loses 86 million dollars a year.  And that dollar figure goes up every year since the lake comes up every year.

    Every foot the lake rises, another 10 to 12-thousand acres go under water.

    It's just insanity.
    panther
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