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Feeling unsure about interview (long)

I'm still searching for a job. I volunteered somewhere so I could have something local on my resume. I got two interviews total (448+ applications/resumes sent out). One interview was very last minute and I was so excited, thinking that they must really need someone for the job. I got there, there had been a miscommunication somewhere down the line, and the position had already been filled by someone else. So I was bummed out, naturally.I now have an interview in a neighboring county on Thursday. I was under the impression that it was 45 minutes away (my DH told me that, I don't know the area). Well, the county line is actually 45 minutes away. The actual worksite is 66 miles away, 1 hour and 25 minutes according to Mapquest.Also, the job is not in my field of certification for teaching. It's in something I have my undergrad in. So I am not as confident teaching this subject, nor am I as excited to teach this. I actually haven't taught this subject since 2006 (TV Production). From calling the Department of Ed, it looks like I wouldn't even be state certified to teach this, nor would I have to be. The school would just issue me a school-specific certificate to teach this subject.How will that affect me down the line career-wise? I wouldn't be able to transfer the certificate if we moved to another state, since it is school-specific. Then I'd have to start over looking for yet another job in the field I am actually certified in.I know I am getting ahead of myself. I am still going to the interview, obviously. Beggars can't be choosers, right? I reserve the right to DD this in a little. I just needed to vent because I HATE long commutes and my DH and I share a car. So logistically, this is hard.

Re: Feeling unsure about interview (long)

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    AMK2009AMK2009 member
    First Comment
    edited December 2011
    I hate long commutes too.  With traffic, I drive about an hour to and from Pittsburgh, and it drives me crazy.  It's like wasting 2 hours every single day!  If you did end up getting the job, since you guys have been looking to buy a house, could you look for something in between your job and your husbands? Also, if you were working, would you be able to buy a car for yourself? 
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    edited December 2011
    Angela, I'm so glad someone else hates commuting besides me! I was driving to and from Moon for grad school and it took 1.5 hours during rush hour (30 miles). I hated every minute of it. The wear and tear destroyed my car faster than I think it would have normally. I was always tired and being on the road exhausted was dangerous. Plus, teaching is one of those careers where you might be lucky enough to miss rush hour (getting out at 4 or so), but there are often activities and things you have to or should go in for on the weekends or at night. Could we get another car? Yes, but it would eat up a huge amount of the money I'd be making the first year. That, combined with my student loans and increased car insurance, and I'd basically be taking nothing home. If I had the job for a few years, it would be worth it, but here, many teachers get laid off after the first year due to budgeting. (Weak/no unions here) Realistically, we'd probably try to make it with one car and still live here in our apartment for the first year. After that, if I still had a job, we maybe would move or get another car.
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    New_to_PGHNew_to_PGH member
    First Comment
    edited December 2011
    Just a note on commuting - when I first moved to PA, I moved in with DH in *grove city*, since he was finishing school at SRU. The commute to my downtown Pittsburgh job was 65 miles each way, and by the end of the first year, I was completely burned out. No way would I ever consider doing that long-term!If it's not a job you think you'd love and want to keep, I'd pass and keep looking locally.
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    edited December 2011
    Hmm, that's a tough one. I'm probably not the best person to be giving advice, since I really have no personal experience to share regarding long commutes/teaching jobs. But it doesn't really sound worth it. I guess the only way to know though is to go on the interview and see for yourself. *sigh* Sometimes I wish I could revert back to childhood!
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    d78d78
    First Comment
    edited December 2011
    I'm sorry to hear about this, kwynn. I'm assuming you've tried private schools, right?I also wanted to chime in that long commutes are absolutely the worst! I had to commute an hour when I worked very early hours (5:30a-12:30p) and it was awful. It entirely contributed to my IBS really flaring up and there were many times I was too tired to be driving in the first place. It was awful. Then I'd get to work and have clients yelling at me for *their* bad decisions (I worked in a methadone facility). And people who say they like the time to themselves are crazy.
    BabyFruit Ticker
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    edited December 2011
    Jenn, I'm glad to hear from someone who had the same commute lengthwise. Of course, this could be a moot point depending on the interview and everything, but I'm wondering if I am even crazy for considering this.So did you keep the job? You did this for the whole year and then moved closer to work?And how long did it take you to drive those 65 miles?I'd love to stay more local, but almost 450 applications has worn me down, and I expanded the area I am searching in out of desperation. Unlike other fields, teaching has one big season a year for hiring (summer). It's possible to get hired other times of the year as a sub or fill-in for maternity leave, but not as common. So I am feeling the time crunch to get something or face being unemployed (at least as a teacher) for the school year.
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    McBridetobeMcBridetobe member
    First Comment
    edited December 2011
    Oh, I don't blame you for not wanting that commute at all.  When I was working in DC, my commute was usually 1.5 hours, each way.  It (on top of not loving my job) ate away at my happiness.  I was pretty much miserable all the time.  I'd still take the interview, of course, just for practice and to see if you think you would really like the position.  I'm glad you are at least getting some positive responses now!  That's a good sign!  :)
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    New_to_PGHNew_to_PGH member
    First Comment
    edited December 2011
    I stayed with the company (coming up on my 4 year anniversary), but we HAD to move at the end of our 1 year lease. I seriously could not keep the commute up - I was calling in to take "sick" days, and I never do that! Since I was driving from Grove City to Pittsburgh, there wasn't a ton of traffic, but I left by 6:30 most day so I wouldn't hit rush hour. My company let's us set our own hours though, so I worked 7-ish to 4-ish, and that kept me from hitting heavy traffic either way. Some days, there would be an accident, and then it SUCKED. One day took me over 2 hours to get in to work, and I missed a ton of important meetings, and everyone was generally unhappy with me. But this job was exactly what I was looking for, and the pay was decent enough to justify the gas costs (gas was $4/gal when I was doing the commute from hell) and downtown parking, etc.
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    New_to_PGHNew_to_PGH member
    First Comment
    edited December 2011
    Oh, and I drove the 65 miles in about 45 min, but I was driving over 80 the whole way! I am not a very patient person :P
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    d78d78
    First Comment
    edited December 2011
    Here's the link for the agency I was thinking of: http://www.southernteachers.com/Internal/Candidates/Default.aspx
    BabyFruit Ticker
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    edited December 2011
    Kwynn-Not much to add that hasn't been said, but I'm sorry that finding a good job has been so frustrating. I totally get that and have been there. I hate cover letters more than crumbly white cheese. And, I agree, long commutes are not good. You should be living life..not driving back and forth to work. I would advise to keep looking for a job in your field that is closer to home. Not the best advice, I'm sure, but may be the best down the line.
    Warning No formatter is installed for the format bbhtml
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    edited December 2011
    Thanks for that link, Dori! I am going to sign up today. Good thing I am so used to it with all my paperwork ready to go!I mailed resumes to every private school in the county (even elementary schools, although I used to be a HS teacher). My DH actually drove me around to drop resumes off at the private schools as well. I had two tell me "maybe," but I've yet to hear back. I'm willing to consider anything, though.KR, how long did you do that commute? I'd love to be able to "split" the commute with DH and live in the middle of this tiny town and the big city. But I have to be honest; with my husband, it will not happen. He works 18 hour days. I can't really ask him to commute an hour one way or anything on top of that, IMO. He also rides his bike to work, so then we'd have to get two cars, since we'd both be driving a huge distance. Kim, how long is your commute in DC? My DH refuses to ever move to a city again because he hates long commutes and claims we'd have horrible commutes in DC.
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    edited December 2011
    I just want to agree with everyone else about the long commutes and not doing what you really want to do.  Here's my story to add.When I first finished grad school, post-docs in my field were really tough to find, so I took a job up in Northern Jersey, 78 miles away in a more industrial/service type position.  I was basically doing contract work for pharmaceutical corps.  My commute would butt up against the tail end of NYC traffic.  It took me 2 hrs in each direction every day.  I was so burnt out and unhappy.  The job, the commute, my life, everything.  I'd get home in tears daily.  DH (FI at that time) and I would fight alot because of how frustrated I was.  I stayed for about a year, then found a post-doc position 5 minutes from my home.  On a bad day (Fri afternoon shore traffic) 15 minutes.  The company up north had tried to make me a better offer (15K more) to stay, but for my sanity, I left.  I took a huge pay cut (with the raise, I now make 25K less than I would have been), but it was soooooo worth it.  I hated everything about my life then and am so much happier now.So, my advice would be to go on the interview.  It never hurts to do this, and may help in the long run.  But, definitely think twice about what the commute/non-field job will do to your sanity.
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    McBridetobeMcBridetobe member
    First Comment
    edited December 2011
    KR, how long did you do that commute? Almost 8 months.  I had worked for this company in Pgh and then transferred to the DC office when we wanted to move (we were originally trying to decide between living in NoVa and Baltimore.)  Beyond the commute, I didn't love the people that I was working with in DC or the new work I was doing, so I knew pretty much knew about a month after I started there that I didn't want to do it forever.  I was commuting via train/metro though - so at least I could read!  He works 18 hour days. I can't really ask him to commute an hour one way or anything on top of that, IMO. He also rides his bike to work, so then we'd have to get two cars, since we'd both be driving a huge distance.The first thing I thought of when someone mentioned living in the middle is how much your H works.  Your hours would definately be better for commuting.
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    edited December 2011
    Kim, how long is your commute in DC? My DH refuses to ever move to a city again because he hates long commutes and claims we'd have horrible commutes in DC.My metro ride is about a half hour each way, which I really think is reasonable (esp. compared to traffic!) I know that DC has the second worst traffic in the U.S., but you can avoid it by taking metro. I honestly don't see much of a difference between living out in the middle of no where and commuting a distance vs. living in a city and having a long commute due to traffic. I think it all adds up to be the same in the end.
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    edited December 2011
    This sucks so bad--I'm sorry you're having so much trouble finding a good position.I'm with you on the commuting.  FI and I take the train into Boston.  It's about 1 hour 45 min in and 2 hours out.  Yes it's the train, but it still impacts the fact that we go to be by 10 pm, so we don't have a life during the week and I rarely cook a real meal during the week, so it's still draining.  I had to drive in for about a month when my hours didn't match the train schedule, and it sucked.  I was exhausted and crabby.I agree with pp about keep looking and at least go to the interview before you rule it out.  And I certainly don't want to dissuade you from pursuing your career in teaching, but I think you mentioned before that you worked in photography.  If you don't get a teaching position by fall, do you think you have some options to do work in photography in the interim?  Just to preserve your sanity and feel like you're contributing to the household?  Just a thought.
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    edited December 2011
    Kim, that commute isn't bad at all! Thirty minutes (when you're not driving and can read, etc) is pretty decent. We looked in 2007 to live in Vienna, VA, and my DH just couldn't make it work as far as commuting and cost of living. I still think we will end up there in a few years though.Colleen, you are commuting almost four hours a day total? Can you move any closer? Or do you not mind the commute? Are you only home to sleep and shower? That's what I'm afraid to get into, honestly. I had to do it for about 1.5 years (for grad school) and I was so drained and miserable. My DH is only home to sleep and shower; I don't think we could both do that commute.I used to work part-time for a photog like you said. I have freelanced down here a little doing that. But it is very rural here and the business just isn't there like it would be in a bigger metro area.
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    edited December 2011
    Kwynn--yup, pretty much 4 hours a day.  It sucks and we hate it.  We are trying to move closer.  FI had bought a house and we were both working within 15 minutes of home.  Then he got a job in Boston, we put the house on the market and started looking move closer.  Then 6 months later I got a job in Boston, we commuted together and continued looking.  We took the house of the market when we got engaged (we were not interested in trying to plan the wedding and a move at the same time).  Plus we got engaged last September when the economy went to pot, so there you have it.  Our realtor is great and works really hard for us to make sure we'll be put on and moving into a good place at the right time.  Plus, we're saving a ton of money making Boston salaries and living where we do.I understand about the photog stuff then.  But just know that you're getting lots of local job vibes from me, because I would wish commutes like mine on anyone!
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    edited December 2011
    D'oh!Err, of course I mean I wouldn't wish commutes like mine on anyone.
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    edited December 2011
    I hate being the late to post! I totally get where you are coming from. My undergrad which I got in NY (but from PA) was totally acceptable in PA for when I moved back (for social work) but when I moved to Ohio where FI lives my social work degree was no longer valid ( I had to be licensed) and I wasn't so I took my test and got licensed. Well while I was living in PA working as a social worker I got my Masters in school counseling which is good for community counseling as well. Well when I moved to Ohio I found out that in order to be a community counselor I had to be licensed for that specifically. I had to go back to school for two more years and do an internship (what!), which I didn't want to do because I really wanted to do school counseling. But school counseling jobs are hard to find. I felt soo stuck! I just got a school counseling job last year but I also drive an hour each way. I have to wake up early and come home late. It sucks but sometimes getting your food into the door is the best thing for something better to come along. An hour and twenty five minutes is a long drive, I don't even know if I can do that. Can you go to a local college there and explain your situation to a professor in your field and find out what you need to do to get that career you want. I hate that criterias changes state to state (licenses, degrees, certifications) The college might be able to give you some ideas or insight. Don't give up hope! A job will come up at the right time for you. I thought it wouldn't for me but it finally did. It's not a my dream job yet becuase it's so far away but I will get there and so will you! Ohio
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    edited December 2011
    Ohio,I dealt with the whole licensing from state to state thing. It took a couple hundred bucks and about 3 months of paperwork! I am licensed to teach in this state (English). Unfortunately, there are no jobs, so the interview I have is for a job not in my field. Does that make sense? Basically, I have already talked to the state department of education and I'm good to go as an English teacher, but there are no jobs.So I am now facing interviewing 1.5 hours away/65 miles in a field that I don't particularly want to teach in just to try to find something. So I'm just torn. I think I would drive an hour. It's far, but doable. A lot of ladies on here have long commutes.But 1.5 hours one way is 3 hours per day. I just don't know if I can do it, especially for the little money it would bring and with sharing a car with my husband.
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    edited December 2011
    It' so weird about the whole job thing. You get your degree/certification but then there are times you end up with a job your aren't even qualified for or even want. For example, in Ohio remember I told you I couldn't do community counseling, wellI did Mental Health Therapist for two years at a school. I was supposed to have a coummunity counseling degree which I did not have. So the company said "well you have a masters (school counseling) and you are certifed in something (social work) so we will hire you. I would say according to Ohio law I should not have worked there, but I needed something (anything). Then I worked a part time job at a hospital doing assessments on adolescents who were suidical or homicidal (again the qaulification for the job was community counseling degree) but I was hired. Techically I should have gone back to school for more classes to have a degree in that. But all in all even though I did jobs I didnt want to do (and payed way less becuase I didnt have the degree) I got to know people, the area, got my foot in the door, and it looked good on my resume. Let me know how the interview turns out. I will be crossing my figures for you!
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