• Images
  • Text
  • Find a Couple + Registry
GO
May 2011 Weddings

Aggie

I know you hate when people do this to you but honestly I'm looking for a second opinion if possible.

Thursday night we had a scare with Bella.  Bascially she was sleeping on my lap at about 8ish and all of the sudden she made this snorting sound and went completely still (and DH and I both believe she stopped breathing.)  Her eyes were rolled back in her head a bit (but it's hard to tell with a cat) and her mouth was open.  We started shaking her to wake her up but she wouldn't move for about 20-30 seconds.  Then DH clapped really loudly and shouted at her, and she finally woke up.  She was a bit out of it for awhile but then went back to being normal Bella.  She did appear to have peed a bit too because there were some small wet spots on the blanket she was on.  We found out over the weekend that she had thrown up underneath the bed Thursday night (after the incident).

We took her to the vet on Friday and her bloodwork and vital signs all checked out.  Apparently her calcium levels were a bit high but nothing out of the normal range.  The vet basically has no idea what happened or why it happened.  Told us to monitor her and hopefully it was just a won time thing

Have you ever seen/heard of something like this before?  Any thoughts on what may have caused it?
May 21, 2011
image

image
my read shelf:
Elizabeth's book recommendations, liked quotes, book clubs, book trivia, book lists (read shelf)

Re: Aggie

  • So I didn't say anything because your vet, having done the physical, is probably the best at having an idea at going on.   That being said, based on what you said there are 2 things that pop into my head.

    1. seizure
    2. Syncope (passing out)

    With a seizure, they usually have some type of uncontrolled muscle movement.  Paddling is most common, but it can be a facial twitch or one leg spasm.  Losing control of their urination is also quite common.  With a seizure they can have what is called a postictal phase (I am using big words only so you can do a little research if you wanted to later). The postictal phase comes after the seizure and they usually act funny for a period of time, a lot of times we see vocalization, clingyness and occasionally vomiting/diarrhea.

    Syncope is when they pass out.  The most common reason for passing out is due to a heart issue or blood pressure.  Typically with syncope they go limp, unconscious for a brief period of time then pop out of it.  Usually they are just fine after the episode, but they can feel a little off for a while depending on the cause.

    As you can tell there are characteristics that can fit with both potential problems.

    Based on your description I am concerned this may be a syncopal event.  Heart disease in cats is extremely hard to diagnose, our typical methods in a general practice are not effective.  Heart murmurs are inconsistent, some have murmurs and no issues their entire life and some die of heart disease with no other clinical symptoms.  X-rays which is also another diagnostic used in dogs to understand the scope of disease is again relatively ineffective in a cat.  The best method of diagnosis of a functional problem is an echo by a cardiologist.  I say functional because if there is a problem with flow, a leaky valve or changes in the walls an echo can see it, but if there is an arrhythmia an echo will not pick that up. 

    SO what would I recommend to do next?  That is a reallly difficult question.  If you are ready to pay for a specialist and do anything for your kitty I may recommend asking for a referral to a cardiologist.  Purely because heart disease is the silent killer in cats.  

    LIke I said before, I haven't seen your kittty so there is a lot I don't know.  And from the sounds of it I think your vet is right on with what I would have done in house and it is quite possible that there really is nothing conclusive on physical exam. ie no clues for your vet to point to what the underlying cause is.  

    Image and video hosting by TinyPic Love is like infinity: You can't have more or less infinity, and you can't compare two things to see if they're "equally infinite." Infinity just is, and that's the way I think love is, too.
    Fred Rogers
  • Thank you Dr. Aggie :)  While I trust our vet, the fact that he was saying he's never really seen this in a cat so he has no idea what caused it or even what happened was concerning.  You've alleviated some of my concerns (and DH's).
    May 21, 2011
    image

    image
    my read shelf:
    Elizabeth's book recommendations, liked quotes, book clubs, book trivia, book lists (read shelf)
  • Well I can't say I have seen that before either. It's really weird for a cat. Seizures AND syncope are much more common in dogs, and if Bella was a dog I would have a much more defined plan for you. I am glad to hear he is honest in saying he is not sure what is going on. I will say that to a client if I genuinely don't have a handle on the root of the problem. Now I usually explain why I don't and will reference things that are more common but saying I don't know is definitely something I wish more of my colleagues would do. 

    I am glad to be of help. I really don't mind answering questions for friends. :-)
    Image and video hosting by TinyPic Love is like infinity: You can't have more or less infinity, and you can't compare two things to see if they're "equally infinite." Infinity just is, and that's the way I think love is, too.
    Fred Rogers
This discussion has been closed.
Choose Another Board
Search Boards