Catholic Weddings

How do I word my invitation if I am having a catholic cermony?

Do I use honor or honour?
Please share with me what you wrote for your invitation.  Both parents are contributing to the wedding. Therefore I am also confused on how to word this them.  I do like the phrase ..... daughter of Mr. and Mrs. and ...... son of Mr. and Mrs.  Can you do this for catholic invitation? I am just trying to get the wording down and the more I think about it an alalyze it, the more frustrated I get.  I just need to make a decision and move on.  This is why I am reaching out to all of you to help me.

Re: How do I word my invitation if I am having a catholic cermony?

  • catarntinacatarntina
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    edited December 2011
    How about something like...

    Mr. and Mrs. {your parents} and
    Mr. and Mrs. {his parents}
    request the honor of your presence
    at the marriage of their children
    {you}
    and
    {FI}

    in the Sacrament of Holy Matrimony
    and the celebration of the Nuptial Mass

    Saturday, the seventh of May
    two thousand and eleven
    at two o'clock in the afternoon

    Church
    Address

    ETA: I think if you do "son of..." it doesn't indicate they're hosting.  It just indicates that you're acknowledging them as his parents, in case people don't know the son but know the parents.
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  • mica178mica178
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    edited December 2011

    Honor is the American spelling.  Honour is the English spelling.  You can pick either, but if you use "The favor of your reply" on your RSVPs, make sure to match honor/favor or honour/favour. 

  • edited December 2011
    I'm just using traditional wording: "At the marriage of their daughter, Professor Science to Future Mr. Professor Science."

    The biggest difference I've seen between Catholic invitations and other wedding invitations is that some Catholic invitations invite the guests to witness the sacrament of marriage, as cat said.  We're not writing it that way because while FI and I are Catholic, my parents are not.  My grandparents have already gotten various undergarments into enough twists that I'm not going to worry about wording.

    Honor/Honour, as mentioned, is a matter of personal preference.

    Good luck!
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  • catarntinacatarntina
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    edited December 2011
    Another difference is that Catholics use "and" instead of "to" in between the names.

    Professor Science, I used the wording you used for the same reason. Me and DH are catholic, but DH's parents are not Catholic and they were already pissed enough that we were having a catholic wedding.
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  • edited December 2011
    In Response to Re: How do I word my invitation if I am having a catholic cermony?:
    Another difference is that Catholics use "and" instead of "to" in between the names.
    Posted by catarntina
    Really?  We just got our invitation proofs back and that was the one thing that bothered my FILs -- they all said "and."  Does that also have to do with the "marriage of"/"sacrament of marriage" difference?
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  • mica178mica178
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    edited December 2011
    You said that both parents are paying.  Either use catarntina's wording, or you could do:

    Mr. and Mrs. [Your Parents]
    request the honor of your presence at the wedding of their daughter
    [Your Name]
    and
    [FI's Name]
    son of Mr. and Mrs. [FFIL's Name]
    in the Sacrament of Holy Matrimony
    etc. etc.

    You shouldn't separate your and your FI's names by anything more than the "and," so if you want to associate each person with his/her parents, you'd have your parents listed above your name and your FILs listed below your FI's names.
  • mica178mica178
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    edited December 2011
    It's "and" between the names, not "to."

    We Catholics believe that the couple gets married to each other, not just the bride getting married to the groom.  It's largely semantics, but it's the correct wording for a Catholic wedding invitation.
  • catarntinacatarntina
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    edited December 2011
    The bride and groom are joined together in holy matrimony.  So they use "and" instead of "to."  If that makes sense.  You're not getting married to someone.  You're being joined together.
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  • edited December 2011
    Hm.  I knew about that.  In fact, FI and I had discussed just walking down the aisle together, to celebrate that fact.  I'd never thought about the wording, though.

    Thanks, girls (and thanks OP for posting or I'd have never learned)!
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  • mica178mica178
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    edited December 2011
    In Response to Re: How do I word my invitation if I am having a catholic cermony?:
    Hm.  I knew about that.  In fact, FI and I had discussed just walking down the aisle together, to celebrate that fact.  I'd never thought about the wording, though. Thanks, girls (and thanks OP for posting or I'd have never learned)!
    Posted by professorscience
    If you did that, you would be doing the "correct" processional form for a Catholic wedding.  I was encouraged by my parish to process in with my then-FI.  Both my father and H opposed that idea (they're both Protestant), so my dad walked me down the aisle.
  • edited December 2011
    In Response to Re: How do I word my invitation if I am having a catholic cermony?:
    In Response to Re: How do I word my invitation if I am having a catholic cermony? : If you did that, you would be doing the "correct" processional form for a Catholic wedding.  I was encouraged by my parish to process in with my then-FI.  Both my father and H opposed that idea (they're both Protestant), so my dad walked me down the aisle.
    Posted by mica178
    I told FI it would make me so much less of an emotional wreck, but we decided that we really do want the opportunity to honor my parents (especially considering how great they've been about my conversion) so we're going the "traditional" route.  Plus I think FI really wants that moment of waiting at the altar for me.
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  • edited December 2011

    Our wording was:

    Dr. and Mrs. X
    and Mr. and Mrs. Y
    request the honor of your presence
    at the Nuptial Mass
    at which their children
    Bride X
    and
    Groom Y
    will join in the sacrament of marriage
    [Date, time, place]

  • ootmother2ootmother2
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    edited December 2011
    we used honour because it's the formal form

    The invitations were  pretty standard, I've never seen Catholic specific wedding invitations.  Until the knot, that is
  • Calypso1977Calypso1977
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    edited December 2011
    we did:

    JLP and PAM request the honour of your presence at their marriage in the sacrament of holy matrimony and the celebration of the nuptial mass.

    date, time place
  • mica178mica178
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    edited December 2011
    We used honour too.
  • ootmother2ootmother2
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    edited December 2011
    In Response to Re: How do I word my invitation if I am having a catholic cermony?:
    It's "and" between the names, not "to." We Catholics believe that the couple gets married to each other, not just the bride getting married to the groom.  It's largely semantics, but it's the correct wording for a Catholic wedding invitation.
    Posted by mica178
    damn it, mica!

    I just pulled out one of the invitations and it says "to" not "and"

    I'm suing Cranes
  • bigleenbigleen
    10 Comments
    member
    edited December 2011
    What about the wording if you're having the ceremony without the full mass? Do you still say "the sacrament of marriage" and just leave the nuptial mass part out?
  • mica178mica178
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    edited December 2011
    In Response to Re: How do I word my invitation if I am having a catholic cermony?:
    What about the wording if you're having the ceremony without the full mass? Do you still say "the sacrament of marriage" and just leave the nuptial mass part out?
    Posted by bigleen
    Yes, assuming that it's a sacrament (both partners baptized, at least one Catholic).

  • bigleenbigleen
    10 Comments
    member
    edited December 2011
    Thanks!
  • ootmother2ootmother2
    Tenth Anniversary 5000 Comments 25 Love Its First Answer
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    edited December 2011
    mica, I would think that Crane's would have caught that.

    Really, "Our Lady of XXX" should have been a dead give away for them.

    I should sue them for whatever, imposing as a knowledgeable engraver perhaps?
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