Military Brides

Question for all Military wives.

My SO and I were wondering what kinds of benefits I would get once we are married (if any) since he is a USMC Veteran. Are there any special benefits that i will recieve once we are married? Such as healthcare and so on? We are just curious since he served 5 years active duty and 3 years non active duty.

Re: Question for all Military wives.

  • He doesn't even get health care anymore, why would you? 



  • everyone says he does but he hasnt went down to check it out yet.
  • He's completely out of the military?  


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  • My SO and I were wondering what kinds of benefits I would get once we are married (if any) since he is a USMC Veteran. Are there any special benefits that i will recieve once we are married? Such as healthcare and so on? We are just curious since he served 5 years active duty and 3 years non active duty.


    As a Veteran, there aren't any benefits that you will receive as his spouse.
  • The only possible health care he "might" receive is if he has a documented disability from the VA and he would have a disability rating for that, ie 10%, 20%, etc.

    There are no benefits for you at all here and if he has a service connected disability he could get treatment for that disability.  

    Does he have a disability rating from the VA?

    Ooops - did think of one more thing:  Burial, and I know that isn't what you were looking for.  Any honorably discharged veteran and their spouse and/or dependent child (child has to be a dependent at time of death) can be buried at a national cemetery.  That would cover the plot, stone, vault, opening and closing of the plot.  

    I am a Veteran and DH and I will be buried at a National Cemetery.  No need to pay for that stuff if it is a benefit to which we are entitled.
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  • So what you are saying is that my SO and I could be buried at a national cemetery for no cost just cause he was Honorably discharged?
  • So what you are saying is that my SO and I could be buried at a national cemetery for no cost just cause he was Honorably discharged?
    Yes. That is your benefit if you get married. Probably not worth getting married just for that, eh?
  • So what you are saying is that my SO and I could be buried at a national cemetery for no cost just cause he was Honorably discharged?
    No, he can.  Unless you are also a veteran, you can not.  There are also actually burial benefits for him in a regular cemetery.  The military will pay for a specific type of headstone for him, but you are responsible for the rest of the burial fees.  
    Other than that, you have no benefits as the wife of a veteran.  


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  • So what you are saying is that my SO and I could be buried at a national cemetery for no cost just cause he was Honorably discharged?
    No, he can.  Unless you are also a veteran, you can not.  There are also actually burial benefits for him in a regular cemetery.  The military will pay for a specific type of headstone for him, but you are responsible for the rest of the burial fees.  
    Other than that, you have no benefits as the wife of a veteran.  
    I have to disagree here.  Spouses CAN be buried in a National Cemetery.  At my transition briefing when I retired, we viewed a video where they actually showed how they are constructed, how you will be stacked one on top of the other, etc.  If a veteran and spouse choose to be buried at a National Cemetery any costs that normally occur once you are inside the gates of a regular cemetery  are free in a national cemetery.

    My DH and I will be buried at the National Cemetery in Battle Creek MI when the time comes because it is closest to my kids.  My ex-h is a Navy vet from the Vietnam era and he and his wife will be buried there also.  Yay - we get to hang out for all eternity...

    Now, in the case of my parents, it went differently.  My dad was a lifer in the AF, was in WWII and the Korean Conflict.  He was eligible for burial in Arlington and really wanted to be buried there when he knew he was dying.  He passed away when I was 3 1/2.  We lived in OH, close to Wright Patterson AFB and my mom knew she would not be able to visit his grave if he were buried in Arlington, so she chose a cemetery with a "Soldier's Mound" where Soldiers are buried together.  He has the traditional white marble headstone.  My mom died 6 1/2 years later and we buried her as close to him as we could but, of course, she can't be in Soldier's Mound.  
    The only benefit we got burying him there was the headstone.  Nothing else was free.

    This is from the VA's website and actually, there are even some circumstances where a Veteran's parents can be buried in a National Cemetery:

    g.  Spouses and Dependents

                (1)  The spouse or surviving spouse of an eligible Veteran is eligible for interment in a national cemetery even if that Veteran is not buried or memorialized in a national cemetery.  In addition, the spouse or surviving spouse of a member of the Armed Forces of the United States whose remains are unavailable for burial is also eligible for burial.

                (2)  The surviving spouse of an eligible Veteran who had a subsequent remarriage to a non-Veteran and whose death occurred on or after January 1, 2000, is eligible for burial in a national cemetery, based on his or her marriage to the eligible Veteran.

                (3)  The minor children of an eligible Veteran.  For purpose of burial in a national cemetery, a minor child is a child who is unmarried and:

                (a)  Who is under 21 years of age; or,

                (b)  Who is under 23 years of age and pursuing a full-time course of instruction at an approved educational institution.

                (4)  The unmarried adult child of an eligible Veteran.  For purpose of burial in a national cemetery, an unmarried adult child is:

                Of any age but became permanently physically or mentally disabled and incapable of self-support before reaching 21 years of age, or before reaching 23 years of age if pursuing a full-time course of instruction at an approved educational institution.  Proper supporting documentation must be provided.

    h.  Parents

                (1) Biological or adoptive parents, who died after October 13, 2010, and whose biological or adoptive child was a servicemember:

                (a)  whose death occurred on or after October 7, 2001, and

                (b)  whose death was the result of a hostile casualty or a training-related injury, and

                (c)  who is interred in a national cemetery, in a gravesite with available space for subsequent
    interment, and

                (d)  at the time of the parent’s death, had no spouse, surviving spouse, or child who is buried, or who, upon death, may be eligible for burial in a national cemetery.

                (2) The term “hostile casualty” means a person who, as a member of the Armed Forces, dies as the direct result of hostile action with the enemy, while in combat, while going to or returning from a combat mission if the cause of death was directly related to hostile action, or while hospitalized or undergoing treatment at the expense of the United States for injury incurred during combat, and includes a person killed mistakenly or accidentally by friendly fire directed at a hostile force or what is thought to be a hostile force.  The term “hostile casualty” does not include a person who dies due to the elements, a self-inflicted wound, combat fatigue, or a friendly force while the person was absent-without-leave, deserter, or dropped-from-rolls status or was voluntarily absent from a place of duty.

                (3) The term “training-related injury” means an injury incurred by a member of the Armed Forces while performing authorized training activities in preparation for a combat mission.  

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