Wedding Invitations & Paper

long distance invite wording

my FH and I dated long distance for 3 years, he is from london, i am from South Carolina. we are not very traditional, i want to have fun with our invite wording.
 Since he is from london, and alot of his family and friends are joining us i thought something along these lines would be fun. does anyone have any suggestions on the rest of it? 
 <s> Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II Requests the Honour of your Presence</s> (need to have this strike out somehow)
Sir Knight William Loomer together with his American Bride, Lady Hope Key would be Honoured at your presence while they pledge their undying love and dedication to each other on the 22nd of September, 2012. This declaration will take place at 7pm on the palmetto terrace at North augusta Municipal building. 
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Re: long distance invite wording

  • I live in the UK, and I'm pretty sure that most of my British friends would find this wording offensive.  It's generally not cool to use the Queen's name (even in jest), and it's frowned upon to give yourself a title that you haven't been given ("Sir", "Lady", etc).   They take this pretty seriously.

    Also, "honour of your presence" is used for church weddings only.  A non-church ceremony should be worded "request the pleasure of your company."   
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    japrincess24
  • LeiselEBLeiselEB member
    2500 Comments Second Anniversary 5 Love Its
    edited February 2012
    I would definitely skip that wording. You wouldn't call yourselves Congressman William Loomer or Dr. Hope Key if you didn't earn those titles, so why would you call yourselves Sir Knight or Lady? That's sort of the impression I'd get if I received this invitation. 

    I used your wording here in a more traditional format: 

    The pleasure of your company is requested as
    Bride Full Name
    and
    Groom Full Name
    pledge their undying love and dedication to each other
    Saturday, the twenty-second of September
    two thousand twelve
    seven o'clock
    The Palmetto Terrace at North Augusat Municipal Building
    City, State
    japrincess24
  • Feedback from my British coworkers: At best it sounds ignorant and childish (ignorant because "Sir Knight isn't a proper title, and as an American aren't nobility so you would not have a title) At worst it sounds like you are mocking the British. And I don't thing mocking your guests is the tone you want to take. Also, if your families are hosting or contributing money to the wedding, I bet they would be offended you gave The Queen the credit.
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  • I agree with previous posters.  It's a cute idea to play up the British angle, but I would find other ways to do it.  Sending it "from" the Queen would be like sending an invitation here saying, "President Barack Obama invites you..."

    Maybe you could find an invitation with a picture of a UK landmark?  Big Ben, the London skyline, etc?
  • edited February 2012
    i see what you are all saying, but at the same time it's humor not serious. i know the guests traveling from London would not be offended. we are having our wedding cake the replica of the London tower bridge. it would be fitting with the theme. and if you didn't notice the part with the Queen would have the strike through it. so it would look like it was crossed out. 
    i still like the idea and so does my British Fiance'. so i will play around with the wording for our titles. thank you for your opinions. 
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  • In Response to <a href="http://forums.theknot.com/Sites/theknot/Pages/Main.aspx/wedding-boards_invites-paper_long-distance-invite-wording?plckFindPostKey=Cat:Wedding%20BoardsForum:cd062f89-8272-496a-b0ab-225e1f87acecDiscussion:459a9fa3-9fdb-4ef6-a8f5-b6b7be40480aPost:3522c530-edc1-45f1-bedd-c1de06c6d142">Re: long distance invite wording</a>:
    [QUOTE]i see what you are all saying, but at the same time<strong> it's humor not serious.</strong> i know the guests traveling from London would not be offended. we are having our wedding cake the replica of the London tower bridge. it would be fitting with the theme. and if you didn't notice the part with the Queen would have the strike through it. so it would look like it was crossed out.  i still like the idea and so does my British Fiance'. so i will play around with the wording for our titles. thank you for your opinions. 
    Posted by hopehairhalo[/QUOTE]

    <div>But a wedding is a serious thing. Yes, you can have fun with it but it is still quite serious. There's a difference between having fun and being offensively "humorous." Also, have you spoken to every single British guest to ask if they would find it offensive? And if you did, did you ever consider that maybe they just didn't want to tell you to your face how awful they find your idea?</div>
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    japrincess24
  • I'm an American and I'd be offended to receive an invitation like that.

    Have you thought about doing airmail style invites? Those remind me of international things and have the colors of the British and American flags... clicky
    japrincess24
  • If I was from the UK I would find this very offensive! I question your maturity
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