Chinese Weddings

Pleasing the older asian guests

I would like to have a western themed wedding (not banquet style at a chinese restaurant) but also please the older asian guests - who will complain about the food if it is not to their liking. I realize that many venues do not allow outside caterers and they are few and far between. We would like to have our ceremony & reception in the same location - does anybody have any suggestions?

Re: Pleasing the older asian guests

  • edited December 2011
    Honestly, they won't be happy with the food unless it is catered by a restaurant. We had Asian fusion food and some of the Asian guests complained, but we expected it. We wanted the American guests to be able to eat too, so we had to compromise. We had the wedding in a hotel where they DID allow some ethnic dishes to be brought in from ethnic vendors - only one dish though, so maybe you can try negotiating some of the venues. We were able to do this because we had a larger guestlist and we paid the service fee for them to serve the ethnic dish.
  • edited December 2011
    My honest opinion is that you cannot please everyone and they are your guests and you are feeding them so they should just eat what is fed to them.We had our first reception at an American venue, so everyone expected American food.  We did, however, have dumplings and sushi at our cocktail hour and this was in line with our Asian theme and pleased everyone.
  • ring_popring_pop member
    2500 Comments
    edited December 2011
    I agree with buttaflai and NJersey, completely. You can't please everyone. We threw in some fusion dishes but they were by no means authentic. Like buttaflai said, they wouldn't be satisfied with Asian food unless it's completely authentic, i.e. from a restaurant, so honestly I wouldn't even bother trying.And please don't delete your posts.
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  • edited December 2011
    I agree with PPs - you can't please everyone.  But I feel that the older Asian crowd will be pleased as long you serve abundant food, regardless of the cuisine.
  • edited December 2011
    Thanks all, these are all good perspectives. Something to keep in mind and weigh the costs. r_p, I made a rookie mistake on the board and deleted my other post because I got a little paranoid. A "friend" of mine basically told me she couldn't be my friend anymore after I told her about my engagement. I told her my prior story so I didn't want her to cyberstalk me but I realize now that I was just being overly cautious. Sometimes one person's happiness can exacerbate somebody else's sadness. Thanks for your help. I wish I left the other post up because it might have helped other people. The good news is that I was able to take all the good advice everybody posted and was able to talk to my mom and reach a compromise over the pig. She said that I don't have to do the pig portion if I don't want to and that it'll be easier for her anyway. I wonder if anybody has ever had duel catering?
  • ring_popring_pop member
    2500 Comments
    edited December 2011
    Not that I tried it, but having 2 caterers sounds like a nightmare to me. They'll just get in each other's way in the kitchen and maybe even fight over the equipment and space.
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  • edited December 2011
    Good point. It might be super expensive too. I found a chinese restaurant that caters and I'm going to see if they can "dumb down" the menu for our american guests. I bet it will cost them less money anyway and our american guests won't be afraid to see chicken heads and fish heads. The standard stuff would go over well, like fried rice, etc. Thanks again for all the realistic advice, fusion chinese food just isn't the same.
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