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Latino Weddings

Puerto Rican traditions

Hi everyone :) So, I am a white girl marrying a Puerto Rican and I have no idea how to incorporate his culture into our wedding. Are there any specific wedding traditions that they follow? I would also like to find a way to make everything bilingual, but it seems like too much to have everything written and spoken in both English and Spanish-i don't want the ceremony to last an hour lol. Any advice or ideas? Any help is greatly appreciated.

BTW, I asked him these questions and he has no idea.

Thanks!!!
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Re: Puerto Rican traditions

  • Cynthia1207Cynthia1207 member
    1000 Comments
    edited December 2011
    Your best bet is asking his family if they would like to incorporate anything.   If they want to, they will tell you.

    As for the ceremony, you can have parts of the ceremony in English, others in Spanish and have your program be bilingual that way people can still follow no matter what language the ceremony is being conducted at the time.

    Good luck!
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  • MariodoMujerMariodoMujer member
    10 Comments
    edited December 2011
    My best friend is Puerto Rican so her wedding is the only info I have about that kind of stuff, but it actually is a lot like a mexican ceremony and I know a lot about that.

    A cojin (cushion or small pillow) is used during the lasso ceremony. You should have two cojines, one for each of you and the officiant usually says something to the effect that they represent the support you should give each other during your marriage.

    The lasso is a rope in the shape of an infiniti, and is placed around your shoulders when you are kneeling on the cojin. This represents unity, two become one.
     
    Arras are 13 coins representing christ and the 12 disciples. They are used to represent your blessings. The groom places the coins in the brides hands and makes a vow to share his blessings with her. She then does the same.

    If you are having a Christian ceremony, a bible is also given which is meant to be the copy the family will share and abide by.

    You can look up everything in bold on a word search to see examples and read more about it. In mexican weddings you ask padrinos (literally translates to godparents but in this case means wedding sponsors) to pay for these gifts and present them to you during the ceremony. They are also part of the processional, but I am not sure if this is the way puerto ricans do it. I agree that you should talk to his family, preferribly a woman because they pay more attention, and the older the better.

    As far as having a bilingual ceremony, it worked really well for my friend. She had two officiants and instead of translating, they simply got together and each came up with a little speech for every aspect of the wedding. (ex. Spanish offciant had no clue what the unity candle was and english officiant was so confused by the word "lasso", so it helped for them to get together)

    When it comes to your vows, he needs to say them in english so that you can understand. You can say them in english too, but it would be so cute and thoughtful if you learn to say them in spanish, even if you have to have it written down in font of you, just a suggestion
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  • edited December 2011
    I'm also marrying a Puerto Rican (my family is Brazilian) & we are incorporating the cultures in the ceremony by having one reading done in Portuguese & one done in Spanish. Our favors are going to be Bem Casados (a traditional Brazilian wedding cake) and the favor box will have a "capia" (ribbon) to decorate it. We're also having two signature drinks, a mango caipirinha, and a rum cocktail (we haven't decided yet) And of course, Puerto Rican & Brazilian music.
    Hope that helps!
  • Nati05Nati05 member
    1000 Comments Fourth Anniversary
    edited December 2011
    In Response to <a href="http://forums.theknot.com/Sites/theknot/Pages/Main.aspx/cultural-wedding-boards_latino-weddings_puerto-rican-traditions?plckFindPostKey=Cat:Cultural Wedding BoardsForum:680Discussion:4ef90bb1-8fc6-4c89-8ea4-d8c619ce980aPost:4cd1fe97-aeb0-4b0b-a73e-7b4747640afc">Re: Puerto Rican traditions</a>:
    [QUOTE]I'm also marrying a Puerto Rican (my family is Brazilian) & we are incorporating the cultures in the ceremony by having one reading done in Portuguese & one done in Spanish. Our favors are going to be Bem Casados (a traditional Brazilian wedding cake) and the favor box will have a "capia" (ribbon) to decorate it. We're also having two signature drinks, a mango caipirinha, and a rum cocktail (we haven't decided yet) And of course, Puerto Rican & Brazilian music. Hope that helps!
    Posted by renatari[/QUOTE]

    Sounds amazing! I like the readings idea and I looove caipirinhas! Mango sounds very yummy!
  • edited December 2011
    Well I am Puerto Rican and I am marrying an African American so I have to incorporate both cultures. But as for my side The ceremonies are usually very Catholic and we also have Madrinos which are the god parents of the wedding you can also look up some stuff online. I did cause my grandparents aren't really around much.

  • I am Puerto Rican and have been to a dozen weddings both here and in Puerto Rico. We are not Mexican and therefore don't necessarily use the lasso but one tradition that has slowly been dying which is beautiful and I've seen done is the gold coins. It is the old tradition of men providing for his wife and family. The man will hold on to the coins and the priest will bless the coins, say a prayer and give a little history as to the coin use. The groom then pours the coins in his bride's hand as a symbol of promise that he will love and provide for her and their family. The coins are then place in a small bag and kept in the home as a reminder of this promise.

    Hope that helps :)

    Katie&Rey
  • I am Puerto Rican and have been to a dozen weddings both here and in Puerto Rico. We are not Mexican and therefore don't necessarily use the lasso but one tradition that has slowly been dying which is beautiful and I've seen done is the gold coins. It is the old tradition of men providing for his wife and family. The man will hold on to the coins and the priest will bless the coins, say a prayer and give a little history as to the coin use. The groom then pours the coins in his bride's hand as a symbol of promise that he will love and provide for her and their family. The coins are then place in a small bag and kept in the home as a reminder of this promise.

    Hope that helps :)

    This post is 3 years old. I'm guessing the OP is married by now.
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