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Catholic Weddings

Please critique my invitation wording!

I'm about to embark on DIY wedding invitations and would like to ask your initial reactions to this wording!  And do you prefer Sacrament of Matrimony or Sacrament of Marriage?  (Matrimony does sound like Princess Bride.)

btw, we are using our baptismal names because that is the Vietnamese Catholic tradition.  You ladies with western names like Margaret, Elizabeth, Ann, or Marie are lucky because there's a saint with that name already.  There are no St. Thanh's. :P

Mr. and Mrs. [bride's father's full name]
&
Mr. and Mrs. [groom's father's full name]

request the honor of your presence
at the Nuptial Mass uniting their children

Therese of Lisieux
[bride's full name]
&
John the Baptist
[groom's full name]

in the Sacrament of Holy Matrimony
Sunday, the [date] of July
two thousand eleven
half after five o'clock in the afternoon

[full name of church]
[street address]
[city, state]

Reception to follow


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Re: Please critique my invitation wording!

  • edited December 2011
    That is exactly how ours read. I think we said Sacrament of Holy Matrimony, but either is fine I believe.
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  • mica178mica178 member
    5000 Comments Fourth Anniversary
    edited December 2011
    I believe grammatically it's "two thousand and eleven."
  • Calypso1977Calypso1977 member
    Knottie Warrior 2500 Comments 25 Love Its First Answer
    edited December 2011
    others on this board disagree with me,  but the wording "at the Nuptial Mass uniting their children" is technically incorrect because the Mass does not unite you in marriage.  the Mass is said in your honor, and in celebration of your marriage.

    we used Sacrament of Holy Matrimony.
  • edited December 2011
    I like Sacrament of Holy Matrimony, but know it can be tricky with fitting onto invitations. I'm actually ok with the slight grammatical error of "nuptial mass uniting" simply because it makes the invites less wordy. I'm still undecided about  I also like two thousand eleven even though I know this is one of those hotly debated Knott issues and various sources say various things.   

    Is it common to put your confirmation name (I assume that's what Therese ofL and John TB are) on invitations? I've never seen or heard of this, which is why I'm asking. If it is not common in your culture/circle, I think you would be ok with taking it out.  Totally OT -- my confirmation patron was also Therese of Lisieux, and I love finding others who share it!
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  • edited December 2011
    In Response to Re: Please critique my invitation wording!:
    [QUOTE] Is it common to put your confirmation name (I assume that's what Therese ofL and John TB are) on invitations? I've never seen or heard of this, which is why I'm asking. If it is not common in your culture/circle, I think you would be ok with taking it out.  Totally OT -- my confirmation patron was also Therese of Lisieux, and I love finding others who share it!
    Posted by bibliophile2010[/QUOTE]

    lol:
    [QUOTE]btw, we are using our baptismal names because that is the Vietnamese Catholic tradition.[/QUOTE]

    Anyway we used Sacrament of Marriage, at the advice of my priest (and personal preference).
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  • clearheavensclearheavens member
    Knottie Warrior 1000 Comments Name Dropper 5 Love Its
    edited December 2011
    In Response to Re: Please critique my invitation wording!:
    [QUOTE]I like Sacrament of Holy Matrimony, but know it can be tricky with fitting onto invitations. I'm actually ok with the slight grammatical error of "nuptial mass uniting" simply because it makes the invites less wordy.Posted by bibliophile2010[/QUOTE]
    Yeah, I struggled with Calypso's concern, too.  It was just too wordy had I done this instead:
    Mr. and Mrs. [bride's father's full name]&Mr. and Mrs. [groom's father's full name]
    request the honor of your presenceat the marriage in the Sacrament of Holy Matrimonyand the celebration of the Nuptial Mass of their children
    Therese of Lisieux[bride's full name]&John the Baptist[groom's full name]
    Sunday, the [date] of Julytwo thousand elevenhalf after five o'clock in the afternoon
    [full name of church][street address][city, state]
    Reception to follow
    FI actually said maybe we should put an asterisk disclaimer: *the Nuptial Mass is a celebration of the Rite of Marriage but is not what is actually uniting us in marriage.
    LOL
    In Response to Re: Please critique my invitation wording!:
    [QUOTE]Is it common to put your confirmation name (I assume that's what Therese ofL and John TB are) on invitations? I've never seen or heard of this, which is why I'm asking. If it is not common in your culture/circle, I think you would be ok with taking it out.  Totally OT -- my confirmation patron was also Therese of Lisieux, and I love finding others who share it!
    Posted by bibliophile2010[/QUOTE]

    Yeah, in the vast overwhelming number of Vietnamese Catholic weddings whether overseas or in Vietnam, couples put their baptismal names on their invitations.  Very orthodox Catholics even sign their names on everything with their baptismal names.  Like mine would be Therese Thanh.  In Vietnam specifically, the country is historically not very open to religious freedom although the population is about 10% Catholic, so it is a sign proclaiming our faith.
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  • edited December 2011
    LOL - I totally missed the part about your baptismal names in your original post. I think that is interesting and cool, just not something I have seen before!  Thanks for helping me to learn something new. I've looked through your bio, and it looks like your wedding is going to be a beautiful blending of cultures.
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  • edited December 2011
    In Response to Re: Please critique my invitation wording!:
    [QUOTE]I believe grammatically it's "two thousand and eleven."
    Posted by mica178[/QUOTE]

    this indicates a decimal, we did not use the "and"
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  • mica178mica178 member
    5000 Comments Fourth Anniversary
    edited December 2011
    "Two thousand eleven" would be mathematically correct, but "two thousand and eleven" is grammatically correct.

    http://wedding.theknot.com/wedding-planning/wedding-invitations/articles/formal-wedding-invitation-wording-one-set-parents-hosting.aspx
  • mica178mica178 member
    5000 Comments Fourth Anniversary
    edited December 2011
    Actually, you could leave off the year altogether as your guests will understand that the invitation will be for the current year, but many people include the year so the invitation can be a keepsake.
  • Calypso1977Calypso1977 member
    Knottie Warrior 2500 Comments 25 Love Its First Answer
    edited December 2011
    clearheavens, taht is nearly identical to our wording.

    we had:

    JLP and PAM request the honor of your presence at their marriage in the sacrament of holy matrimony and the celebration of the nuptial mass.
  • ootmother2ootmother2 member
    Tenth Anniversary 5000 Comments 25 Love Its First Answer
    edited December 2011
    town and state, not the address is necessary

    two thousand and ten is poor math but proper etiquette
  • akg0053akg0053 member
    1000 Comments Combo Breaker
    edited December 2011
    In Response to Re: Please critique my invitation wording!:
    [QUOTE]I believe grammatically it's "two thousand and eleven."
    Posted by mica178[/QUOTE]

    It's two thousand eleven. 
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  • ootmother2ootmother2 member
    Tenth Anniversary 5000 Comments 25 Love Its First Answer
    edited December 2011
    two thousand AND eleven

    read Crane's
  • edited December 2011

    We were thinking of using:

    Mr. & Mrs. X
    Request the honour of your presence
    At the Nuptial Mass at which their daughter
    K
    and
    Mr. W
    Will be united in the sacrament of holy matrimony

    But I think I like the "at the nuptial mass uniting their daughter, K and Mr. W, in the sacrament of holy matrimony."  It does seem to flow better, but I understand that its not really correct that way.  I don't like the two "at's" in my original wording.

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  • clearheavensclearheavens member
    Knottie Warrior 1000 Comments Name Dropper 5 Love Its
    edited December 2011
    In Response to Re: Please critique my invitation wording!:
    [QUOTE]We were thinking of using: But I think I like the "at the nuptial mass uniting their daughter, K and Mr. W, in the sacrament of holy matrimony."  It does seem to flow better, but I understand that its not really correct that way.  I don't like the two "at's" in my original wording.
    Posted by wallyandkristin[/QUOTE]
    I agree with you, too many 'at's.  I proposed a wording below that got rid of one.  I also capitalized Sacrament of Holy Matrimony because the name of sacraments are proper words and capitalized: Sacrament of Baptism, Sacrament of Reconciliation, etc.
    Also, do you want to omit your FI's parents' names?  The people who are hosting do not necessarily have to be the ones shelling out the money.  It's personal preference, but I think adding FI's parents to the invitation helps acknowledge that you two mutually enter marriage from two families.

    Mr. & Mrs. XRequest the honour of your presenceAt the Nuptial Mass asK
    and 
    Mr. W[son of Mr. & Mrs. X]
    Will be united in the Sacrament of Holy Matrimony
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  • Calypso1977Calypso1977 member
    Knottie Warrior 2500 Comments 25 Love Its First Answer
    edited December 2011

    proper etiquette states that the grooms' parents names never go on a wedding invitation.  the approrpriate place for their names is on the wedding annoucements.  however, many today put the grooms parents on the invitation.

  • banana468banana468 member
    Knottie Warrior 10000 Comments 500 Love Its First Answer
    edited December 2011
    I don't know that proper etiquette states that the groom's parents are never on there.  It only states that the hosts are on there.  The new tradition of adding "son of" isn't anti-etiquette as long as it meets the approval of the hosts of the wedding.
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