• Images
  • Text
  • Find a Couple + Registry
GO
Catholic Weddings

NWR: NFP Meltdown

I went and saw a Napro doctor today by recommendation of my billings teacher and while I'm there the doctor says I need to switch to the Creighton Model and gives me a book and basically says start over...here I am 4 months before my wedding having to learn this new method and I am terrified. 

Any advice on coping with this? Should I go take a formal class on this now? She went in to detail about it with me today, but I was so busy trying to calm myself down internally about having to switch methods that I did not pick up on most of what she was saying.

Another question for those of you practicing NFP how far do you drive to see your doctor?

Re: NWR: NFP Meltdown

  • Napro docs use the creighton codes to diagnose. The creighton method is for HER purposes of your care. 

    The fact that you are getting married soon, you can still use the info you know already. 

    In order to be considered using Creighton though, you must take a class. I highly recommend the classes though to keep the terms consistent.

    I think that might be the most challenging part of switching methods is the terminology change. 


  • I'm not positive, but I think Creighton and Billings do have some similarities.  There are still stickers (and I'm pretty sure the colors are the same).  Creighton has much stricter guidelines and terminology, whereas Billings allows the user to come up with her own descriptive terms for CM.  So I think you'd be just fine.

    I'm curious why the NaPro doc told you to switch, though.  I use Billings, even had some fertility issues, and have been quite successful...  I am almost positive you could find a Billings doctor in the MSP area.  Go to boma-usa.org and there will be a link for finding physicians.

    As for your second question, I was willing to drive very, very far to see an NFP doctor.  When my husband and I were looking at moving out to the panhandle of Texas, it was very likely I was going to have to drive at least an hour into the nearest major city to find someone.  It can be very frustrating to have a medical professional tell you that your choice to practice NFP is wrong and ineffective, so I wanted to avoid that problem.
    Anniversary

    image

    image

  • NaPro is linked to Creighton, so it makes sense that a NaPro doctor would prefer you utilize Creighton. If you feel comfortable with the Billings method, it might make sense to find a doctor that will work with you. I agree with professor - the two methods aren't that different, so you might not have too much trouble switching to Creighton if you really want to work with this doctor. Do you have any medical conditions that would better treated using NaPro technology? If not, it might not be necessary to switch.
  • I'm sure it's a very frustrating situation.  If you're going to stick with this doctor, though, you'll need to chart Creighton, and therefore, you'll need the class.  If you don't want to switch methods, I recommend looking into other doctors in the area.  Talk to your Billings instructor.  Let her know that the doctor you saw wants you to use Creighton, and see if she can recommend another doctor who will be a bit more flexible. 

     

  • I drive 40 minutes. I know people that drive from states away to see these docs.
  • When deciding how far is too far to go for a Napro doctor, you need to consider that he'll likely order a series of blood tests or ultrasounds (as in, every other day for a week).  If your doctor is okay with you getting labs done a little closer to home (or work), that can help, but sometimes the results aren't as accurate from different places, so some doctors don't want you getting bloodwork done at your primary care doctor's office, you know?  If you work 9-5, then it's hard to fit in blood work every other morning, and an ultrasound every other afternoon, even if it's five minutes away.  If it's an hour away, that practically means you need to take off work for 2 weeks.  When I went through my testing last October, I had to miss work several afternoons because of ultrasounds.  I was able to get bloodwork before work, but ultrasounds were a little harder to schedule.  Luckily my job is flexible, but some employers might not be so okay with that.  It's not just "oh, I don't want to drive an hour."  It's more "I need my job." 

    (My Napro doctor is a few states away...I talk to him on the phone, we fax/mail each other things like charts, Rx, etc, and I get all my labwork done locally.  Where there's a will, there's a way!)

     

  • We're 35ish minutes from my NaPro doc, but I happily drove an hour from work last year for tests and treatments.

    That said, take a deeeeeeep breath. Everything you already know about charting Billings is going to help you. Creighton has lots of details that make it good science, and thus good for diagnosis and treatment. Plus, you already have a good idea of what your body does, so you're just applying the standardized terminology to it. And you still have four months before your wedding to get used to it!

    You definitely want to take a class to get comfortable with using the method (and for help/troubleshooting), but the basic charting really isn't that hard, even though it can look overwhelming at first. Take it one step at a time -- get used to using the codes to "describe" your mucous. Get used to the observational routine. It will all come together. I promise.

    In the mean time, there are lots of us here who are are Creighton users, so if you have questions (even TMI questions), we're happy to help.
    Baby Birthday Ticker Ticker
  • Am I the odd woman out, cuz I have no idea what you ladies are talking about!!
    Praying for a miracle!
  • NFP: Natural Family Planning. Tracking symptoms of a woman's cycle to determine fertile and infertile times for purposes of avoiding or achieving pregnancy and also to assist doctors in diagnosing and treating problems. 

    There are 4 reliable methods of tracking fertility. The creighton method is connected to NAPRO technology http://www.naprotechnology.com/

    This is treatment of issues without artificial hormones that cuase harm and don't actually fix the problem. There are doctors that specialize in this care, "napro docs" or "nfp only " doctors. 


  • newlyseliskinewlyseliski member
    1000 Comments Fourth Anniversary Combo Breaker
    edited April 2013
    That's frustrating!! My doctor is most familiar with Creighton (which I also use) and is also Napro trained, but works with any NFP-only patients!  She's in Maple Grove at the Park Nicollet clinic and has given me really good referrals within the Park Nicollet system.  I drive about 20-25 minutes to see her but will be moving closer soon, hopefully!  The Twin Cities do have a good variety of NFP-friendly physicians to choose from, so hopefully you can find someone who's a better fit.  There are quite a few different options on the west side of the metro, but I think AALFA clinic has a monopoly on the East side of things and is pretty strictly Napro/Creighton-only.

    Honestly, if you're most familiar with Billings... I'd stick with what you're comfortable with until after the wedding because the 4 months beforehand can be super stressful and switching methods and terminology (even if Billings and Creighton both reference the same fertility signs) would probably just be one more thing that you have to worry about!  Does your Billings instructor have a specific doctor that she recommends?
  • In Response to Re: NWR: NFP Meltdown:
    NFP: Natural Family Planning. Tracking symptoms of a woman's cycle to determine fertile and infertile times for purposes of avoiding or achieving pregnancy and also to assist doctors in diagnosing and treating problems.  There are 4 reliable methods of tracking fertility. The creighton method is connected to NAPRO technology http://www.naprotechnology.com/ This is treatment of issues without artificial hormones that cuase harm and don't actually fix the problem. There are doctors that specialize in this care, "napro docs" or "nfp only " doctors. 
    Posted by agapecarrie
    Thank you for the information! I was awfully confused!

    Praying for a miracle!
  • Curious here- we used NFP, with Taking Charge of Your Fertility and FertiltyFriend.com. No doctors or testing. I consider myself pretty darn educated in NFP and honestly think it's rather simple once your learn what you're looking for. May I ask what is with all the doctors and testing and bloodwork/ultrasounds? It seems as if it's making NFP harder than it needs to be.

    I was baptized Catholic but am still unsure of my beliefs. I currently attend an Episcopalian Church. But from the little I do know about Catholicism and NFP, aren't you not supposed to prevent unless there are very serious circumstances? I'm not trying to knock anyone I'm truly curious and really want to learn more about this subject. I appreciate any insight.

    To the OP: I think you'll be fine going between the 2 methods. Good luck!!

    After 6 years and 2 boys, finally tying the knot on October 27th, 2013!

  • In Response to Re: NWR: NFP Meltdown:
    Curious here- we used NFP, with Taking Charge of Your Fertility and FertiltyFriend.com. No doctors or testing. I consider myself pretty darn educated in NFP and honestly think it's rather simple once your learn what you're looking for. May I ask what is with all the doctors and testing and bloodwork/ultrasounds? It seems as if it's making NFP harder than it needs to be. I was baptized Catholic but am still unsure of my beliefs. I currently attend an Episcopalian Church. But from the little I do know about Catholicism and NFP, aren't you not supposed to prevent unless there are very serious circumstances? I'm not trying to knock anyone I'm truly curious and really want to learn more about this subject. I appreciate any insight. To the OP: I think you'll be fine going between the 2 methods. Good luck!!
    Posted by acove2006
    If there are any fertility issues, bloodwork/ultrasounds/etc. would be necessary.  For example, through charting I learned I wasn't ovulating, and my doctor did an ultrasound to confirm.  To find out why, I went through a battery of tests, including a blood draw.

    Some methods (such as Creighton) are definitely preferable for women with issues like PCOS, because the technology can easily be synced with medical treatments.  MOST of the time, women are fine using the sympto-thermal method (however, once you have a child and your sleep becomes irregular, temping is rendered pretty much useless, which is why all methods stress fluid as the primary indicator).

    To your second question, my understanding is that couples must have "just cause" to abstain.  This could be grave medical issues, or it could simply be financial unpreparedness.  Wanting a little time between each child is also justifiable.
    Anniversary

    image

    image

  • I chart Creighton method and was showing some weird symptoms. They could indicate something as simple as low progesterone, or something as serious as pre-cancer.

    The blood tests post peak show my progesterone levels. Even after treating with a natural progesterone, symptoms continued, so hysteroscopy tests proved I didn't have cancer.
    Also, miscarriages are common with low progesterone.
    Blood tests for blood sugar/insulin resistence related to PCOS. 
  • If you have healthy, normal cycles, you are correct in your assessment that none of the medical interventions are necessary.

    For many people, though, charting uncovers issues with their reproductive health. I've had very regular periods my whole life and still discovered an easily treatable hormone imbalance through charting. One the the beauties of charting is that it helps a woman learn about and treat these legitimate health concerns in a dignified way that respects her fertility, rather than mask it.

    The Church does not define the specific reasons that are appropriate for delaying pregnancy. The Catechism uses the word "just" (CCC2368), but ultimately, the discernment is left to the couple to exercise responsible parenthood and a spirit of generosity (rather than selfishness) when it comes to the decision whether to delay pregnancy.
    Baby Birthday Ticker Ticker
  • And in case anyone hasn't seen this - "Why doesn't the Church just make a list about when it's valid to avoid pregnancy?"
    Anniversary
  • thank you so much! I totally agree with charting finding problems, I must have been reading the posts backwards because I was thinking all the testing was needed TO chart which is why I was so confused. Charting is invaluable to me, as through it I learned that my anxiety and IBS was triggered during ovulation and my period.

    I wish NFP didn't get such a bad rap, especially within the church. Gotta love the rhythm method comparisions. I also never new there were doctors that specifically practiced or taught NFP. I would def. be willing to drive an hour or so to see such a doctor.

    OP: I would take a class if you can, but agin I think you'll find it relatively easy to switch. You already know the basics! Good luck!

    After 6 years and 2 boys, finally tying the knot on October 27th, 2013!

This discussion has been closed.
Choose Another Board
Search Boards