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Etiquette

Invitation Wording, We're paying for it all....

I am working on the invitations for my second marriage. We are paying for the wedding ourselves and ordering invitations online. The form has a Host line and then has the auto-fill of, "Request the honor of your presence at the marriage of their daughter..." Should I just use my parents in the Host line or is there a better way to word it? I guess the fact that it is my second marriage is irrelevant...

Re: Invitation Wording, We're paying for it all....

  • How about...
    Bride Name and Groom name
    Request the honor of your presence as they unite in marriage on
    Date
    Time
    Location

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  • I like that. I was also thinking maybe, "Your presence is requested at the marriage of...."
  • We are using the language above. We are also paying for the entire thing and hosting it. 
    "There is always some madness in love. But there is also always some reason in madness." -Friedrich Nietzsche, "On Reading and Writing"
  • Another option (please check the exact wording but it is along these lines)

    The honor of your presence is requested at the marriage of
    Brides full name
    to
    Grooms full name
    Date
    Time
    Location

  • MobKazMobKaz Chicago suburbs member
    Ninth Anniversary 5000 Comments 500 Love Its 5 Answers
    I am working on the invitations for my second marriage. We are paying for the wedding ourselves and ordering invitations online. The form has a Host line and then has the auto-fill of, "Request the honor of your presence at the marriage of their daughter..." Should I just use my parents in the Host line or is there a better way to word it? I guess the fact that it is my second marriage is irrelevant...
    Using that phrase implies that your wedding will be held in a church ceremony.  If your ceremony is being held in a non church venue, you would use the phrase, "Request the pleasure of your company."
    PrettyGirlLostdoeydoTeddiD34WildMagelet
  • Ditto @mobkaz; "Honour of your presence" means your wedding is physically being held in a church. "Pleasure of your company" is for all other weddings -- including religious ones! -- that aren't in physical church buildings. 
    Anniversary

    image
    I'm gonna go with 'not my circus, not my monkeys.'
    PrettyGirlLost
  • Jen4948Jen4948 Houston member
    10000 Comments Sixth Anniversary 500 Love Its 25 Answers
    Who's paying doesn't equal who's hosting, and it's actually irrelevant as far as invitation wording goes, because the financial arrangements are none of the guests' business.  For wedding purposes, who's hosting = who are the "point persons" of the wedding-that is, who issue invitations, receive replies, greet guests, and see that their needs are taken care of.

    If that's you and your FI, I'd use

    The honour of your presence (for a ceremony at a house of worship)/pleasure of your company (all other ceremonies) is requested
    at the marriage of
    Bride
    and
    Groom
    Date
    Time
    Venue
    Address
    City, State
  • We might do something like The honour of your presence is request at the marriage of Bride, daughter of, to Groom, son of.

    Maybe.....

  • I think we are just doing,

    "You are cordially invited to the wedding of [  ] and [   ]" and leaving off any parent names.

  • Also, aren't guests being invited to the "wedding" not the "marriage"?  When I see an invite inviting someone to "the marriage of..." I think of setting up bleachers outside the couple's home so people can look in on their married life.
    rvg22climbingwife
  • Jen4948Jen4948 Houston member
    10000 Comments Sixth Anniversary 500 Love Its 25 Answers
    Also, aren't guests being invited to the "wedding" not the "marriage"?  When I see an invite inviting someone to "the marriage of..." I think of setting up bleachers outside the couple's home so people can look in on their married life.
    Standard invitation wording is to the "marriage" and not the "wedding."  The word "marriage" indicates that what one is being invited to witness is a wedding ceremony being performed.
  • We did not put any host information on the invite (we planned the majority of the event, sent the invites, received the replies, only us in the receiving line, though I know my parents at least will be available/willing during the ceremony and reception to help things flow). 

    If I remember correctly, we put "The pleasure of your company is requested at the marriage of SP29 and FI of SP29 on....".

    If we had put any family information on there, because both of our parents are separated/divorced, we would have done something like "Together with their families, SP29 and FI of SP29 request the pleasure of your company....". 
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