Wedding Invitations & Paper

Invite Wording - both my parents, MOG, and us paying

Need some input on how to word my invites. My parents are making the majority of the financial contribution, followed by an equal amount from the mother of the groom and the groom and I. How should I word the invites?

The grooms father is not contributing, so it seems odd to say "together with their parents". Or maybe I'm wrong?

Re: Invite Wording - both my parents, MOG, and us paying

  • Jen4948Jen4948 Houston member
    Tenth Anniversary 10000 Comments 500 Love Its 25 Answers
    edited August 2014
    The wording of wedding invitations depends not on who is paying but who is hosting.  Hosting is not the same thing as paying for the wedding.  It means who is acting as the "point persons" for the guests-that is, issuing the invitations, receiving the replies, greeting guests at the wedding, and making the arrangements that ensure that their needs are attended to?  It's possible to contribute money without doing any of these things.

    Also, it's not an "honor" to be listed on an invitation, because the only persons "honored" by an invitation are the guests-not the couple, not their parents. 

    So, your parents should only be listed if they are actually hosts, that is, doing the above-mentioned things that would make them "point persons."  If they aren't doing these things, they should not be listed, regardless of how much they are contributing financially, because they are not the hosts or the honorees. 

    Wedding invitations are not playbills.  Their purpose is not to map out the family tree.  If you want to honor anyone, the place to do that is in a wedding program if you are using them.
  • Ditto Jen on the hosting versus paying. Make sure you're clear on that distinction. Keep in mind the invitation isn't meant to be a declaration from a mountain top "HERE'S WHO PAID FOR MY WEDDING". It's to say 1) who's hosting; 2) who's getting married 3) when and where. It's informational and that's it.

    If they're all hosting (except FOG), I still think you should use "Together with their families". It's a lot less awkward than trying to list people out by name. 
    *********************************************************************************

    image
    KellyT22
  • CMGragainCMGragain member
    10000 Comments 500 Love Its Fourth Anniversary 25 Answers
    edited August 2014
    Are the Groom's parents married?

    Together with their families
    Bride's Full Name
    and
    Groom's Full Name
    request the pleasure of your company
    as they are united in marriage
    Day, date
    time o'clock
    Venue Name
    Address
    City, State

    Divorced?

    Mr. and Mrs. John Bridesparents
    Ms. Jane Groomsmother
    request the pleasure of your company
    at the marriage of
    Bride's Full Name
    and
    Groom's Full Name
    Day, date  (etc.)

    Of course, if you are having a church wedding, you request the "honour of your presence".  The bride and groom never take credit for hosting their own wedding.  If that is the case, it is worded like this:

    The pleasure of your company is requested
    at the marriage of
    Bride's Full Name
    and
    Groom's Full Name (etc.)

    httpiimgurcomTCCjW0wjpg
    MairePoppy
  • I think "together with their parents" or "families" is fine :)
    KellyT22
  • AddieCakeAddieCake Beyond the Wall member
    10000 Comments 500 Love Its Fourth Anniversary 25 Answers
    Together with their families.
    What did you think would happen if you walked up to a group of internet strangers and told them to get shoehorned by their lady doc?~StageManager14
    image
    KellyT22
  • CMGragainCMGragain member
    10000 Comments 500 Love Its Fourth Anniversary 25 Answers
    edited August 2014
    @KnotPorscha MOHAlly is a vendor!
    httpiimgurcomTCCjW0wjpg
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