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NWR: Baby Bug and PCOS (TMI)

Ladies I think I'm finally getting the baby bug? the baby itch?  Whatever you call it - I'm getting there.  My question is for those who have PCOS or know someone who did.    Was it difficult to conceive?   I've known I've had PCOS for well over half my life.   My husband and I weren't planning on TTCing until this Fall, but now that I'm thinking about it more, I'm wondering if because of PCOS I should start sooner as all I hear is that it'll take forever to conceive.  

Anyone who have PCOS start a health regime before TTC?   According to my doctor I should be fine, just doing prenatal vitamins a month before going off BCP.   And then just starting immediately trying (not waiting once my last pack ends).   But I was wondering if there's anything else I should be doing or any other recommendations heard?  Or what others who have PCOS went through/are going through?

Re: NWR: Baby Bug and PCOS (TMI)

  • I think PCOS really varies person to person.   I have PCOS but according to the reproductive endocrinologist that I saw, I don't "present" as having it other than the pearling on my ovaries and a few other symptoms.

    Eating healthy was probably the best thing I did but again, my case isn't terrible.    
  • OliveOilsMomOliveOilsMom South Jersey member
    Eighth Anniversary 5000 Comments 500 Love Its 5 Answers

    We have been officially trying since July.  And not very careful for a few months before that.  I have not ovulated during that whole time.  From March (when I stopped BC) until August, I did not get a period, so I went back to the doctor and she gave me prometrium to help kick start my ovaries.  I take that once a month for 10 days or so to, but it has not had the kickstarting effect necessary to get pregnant.  We have been trying "enough" now for the doctor to start furthering my treatments to get pregnant.  Over the next few months I will be placed on clomid and metformin.  If 3 months of that does not work, then I will be referred to an RE. 

    I have done a lot to try and get pregnant on my own.  I started eating healthier, I now take a supplement that has helped women with PCOS, I've been on pre-natals for about a year, I chart my temperature, and I recently added in a fertility monitor.  So for me, it just seems that I will need extra medical assistance.

    When we were getting ready to start TTC, I read the book PCOS and your Fertility.  It was very informative.  I also think the first step is talking to your doctor.  He/she may have some further blood tests or ultrasounds they may want to perform.  The results of those tests could help determine the amount of potential medical interventions needed.

    And, as Banana said, PCOS effects people differently.  Some present more symptoms than others.  I feel I don't have many of the typical PCOS symptoms, based on my readings about PCOS, but the big one is that I don't ovulate.  And I have always been that way since I started getting my period.  I could go a full year without a period.

  • holyguacamole79holyguacamole79 a taco truck in Houston member
    5000 Comments 500 Love Its Fourth Anniversary 5 Answers
    I had / have a pretty bad case of PCOS.  PM me if you'd like to talk more.
  • jenna8984jenna8984 clam bakes & patriots member
    5000 Comments Fifth Anniversary 500 Love Its First Answer
    Sorry, I don't have any advice or experience- just wanted to say good luck!

                                                                     

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  • We have been officially trying since July.  And not very careful for a few months before that.  I have not ovulated during that whole time.  From March (when I stopped BC) until August, I did not get a period, so I went back to the doctor and she gave me prometrium to help kick start my ovaries.  I take that once a month for 10 days or so to, but it has not had the kickstarting effect necessary to get pregnant.  We have been trying "enough" now for the doctor to start furthering my treatments to get pregnant.  Over the next few months I will be placed on clomid and metformin.  If 3 months of that does not work, then I will be referred to an RE. 

    I have done a lot to try and get pregnant on my own.  I started eating healthier, I now take a supplement that has helped women with PCOS, I've been on pre-natals for about a year, I chart my temperature, and I recently added in a fertility monitor.  So for me, it just seems that I will need extra medical assistance.

    When we were getting ready to start TTC, I read the book PCOS and your Fertility.  It was very informative.  I also think the first step is talking to your doctor.  He/she may have some further blood tests or ultrasounds they may want to perform.  The results of those tests could help determine the amount of potential medical interventions needed.

    And, as Banana said, PCOS effects people differently.  Some present more symptoms than others.  I feel I don't have many of the typical PCOS symptoms, based on my readings about PCOS, but the big one is that I don't ovulate.  And I have always been that way since I started getting my period.  I could go a full year without a period.

    @OliveOilsMom ; This is my big worry.   I've been on birth control for 17 years now, so I get my period every month, but before I started, I could go 6 months to a year in between them.   I've never been off it, so I'm worried that once i do instead of staying regular I'll revert back to nothing.
  • OliveOilsMomOliveOilsMom South Jersey member
    Eighth Anniversary 5000 Comments 500 Love Its 5 Answers

    @LakeR2014 ; I did not start BCP until diagnosed about 4-5 years ago now.  I basically avoided the GYN throughout my 20s, as bad as that is.  So I just lived with getting nothing and avoided my PCP's advice to go to the GYN.  So if it was your "normal" before the pills to get nothing, its possible that will be your "normal" after you stop taking them.  But I'm not a doctor, so if your annual isn't coming up soon, maybe make an appointment so you can begin to discuss what your doctor would want you to do.

    In the book I mentioned above and other sources, it is recommended to eat a low glycemic diet.  There are success stories of people eating a strict low glycemic diet and having their bodies respond positively enough that they begin ovulating regularly.  But obviously, this doesn't work for everyone.  The book also goes through some western medicine options too, like herbs, acupuncture, reflexology, etc.  If you are into that sort of thing.

    LakeR2014
  • lilacck28lilacck28 member
    500 Love Its 1000 Comments Fourth Anniversary First Answer
    edited April 2015
    PP covered most of what I would have said. I've known about possibly having PCOS for a long time (but was told... "oh, maybe. but if you do, it's mild", and yesterday it was confirmed "you definitely have it. no question."

     I haven't done intense research yet, but one thing to add:The APRN who saw me after the ultrasound told me that after I get off the pill they will first put me on Metformin (helps with insulin resistance and therefore encourages weight loss and ovulation... it's a diabetes medication.)  I think Metformin is a fairly normal treatment for PCOS these days. And then if you don't ovulate after taking Metformin, there are other medications they can add to it (ex: Clomid). Maybe that's something to ask your Dr. about? 

    ETA: I just saw that OliveOil already mentioned that. Sorry for the redundancy. 
    LakeR2014
  • lovemyrunnerlovemyrunner Nebraska member
    Ninth Anniversary 250 Love Its 100 Comments Name Dropper
    I was diagnosed with PCOS about ten years ago, and my sister just got her diagnosis this week.  Banana is correct, it presents very differently in different people, probably due to the fact that it's a diagnosis of exclusion.  This means there is no "PCOS test."  They just test you to exclude all the other things that could cause your symptoms, and if it's not those, they call it PCOS.  For instance, some women diagnosed with PCOS don't have ovarian cysts.  I will say, that my cousin, who also has it was able to conceive twice on Clomid, and my mom who had all the symptoms but was never diagnosed conceived twice with no help.  Many people say conception is easiest right after you stop BCP.  Check out the forum SoulCysters... just for women with PCOS, it's gots lots of info on fertility, diet, exercise, etc.
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