Wedding Woes

I worry about my needy students, especially during the holidays.

Dear Prudie,
I am a veteran public school teacher at a very needy school. I work in a small group setting with students who have academic trouble. I love my job and I love my students. However, I find myself having a very hard time enjoying the holiday season knowing the dire living situations that some of my kids are in. I report to authorities what is actionable. I buy snacks and coats when I can, and have even bought alarm clocks for kids whose parents aren’t getting them up to come to school. My school has some good programs to help fill the gaps. But when I am buying groceries or Christmas presents, I think, “How is it that some of my kids have food and presents and so many others at my school will be spending Thanksgiving break just waiting for school to open back up so they can have two meals a day and a safe place to be?” With SNAP benefits being cut, so many more of our school families are struggling. My husband is very supportive and never fusses at me for the things I buy for students, but he does encourage me to let go of the worries while I am at home. Do you have any advice?

—A Teacher

Re: I worry about my needy students, especially during the holidays.

  • hyechica81hyechica81 member
    Seventh Anniversary 1000 Comments 100 Love Its First Answer
    edited December 2013
    i would get with the other teachers in the school and see if you can pull your resources together and each teacher donates something to contribute to the students like sweat pants, some food, gift cards for food. you cant control what goes on with every student.


    at home you need to focus on yourself your husband and your family maybe you can arrange or organize for some type of soup kitchen at your school twice a month so that students and family who need food can stop in and get a nice warm meal
  • thejucheideathejucheidea East Nashville, Tennessee member
    Tenth Anniversary 2500 Comments 500 Love Its First Answer
    i would get with the other teachers in the school and see if you can pull your resources together and each teacher donates something to contribute to the students like sweat pants, some food, gift cards for food. you cant control what goes on with every student.


    at home you need to focus on yourself your husband and your family maybe you can arrange or organize for some type of soup kitchen at your school twice a month so that students and family who need food can stop in and get a nice warm meal
    It... it's a thing from Dear Prudence.

  • edited December 2013

    I can relate to this one. We have a corporate sponsor this year, and they have adopted a few families from our school. We picked the neediest of the bunch. One family had a house fire and lost everything. Grandmother heads the home, and there are four kids.

     

    One family has the saddest story. The dad died in a car accident and mom is trying to take care of three kids on her own. He was the major bread winner, and she cleans houses, and now things are really bad.

    image
  • Never fails....*looks up*

    I was wondering if you could contribute heavily to conversation, NOLA.  I've heard stories from friends, or family about the lack of many things for students. 
  • I learned years ago after going on my first home visit. It was a wake up call to see how some of our kids live.

    I don't make assumptions anymore. I don't assume that a kid got something for his birthday or that there was a big Thanksgiving meal. You let them tell you want they did for Christmas.

     

    I admit to having a soft spot for birthdays, and will get a little something for my special babies.

    image
    thejucheideamrsconn23
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