Wedding Invitations & Paper
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I have bad handwriting

Its true, my handwriting sucks.  I get "thats really your signature" all the time because its lazy and short.  I sign a ton of stuff at work and over time it got shortened.  Dont even care. 

Do I spend a zillion dollars to get them handwritten by someone else?  Do I let my mom do it who has better handwriting but I really dont want to put that on her?  Do I print them?  I am not sure if I should put them through the printer depending on the paper size AND is there a program I can use that will print pretty envelopes for me?  Microsoft Word just isnt cutting it.

Re: I have bad handwriting

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    I would print on the envelopes. I used Microsoft Word for my STDate envelopes and they turned out quite nicely. I downloaded a font I liked and used the mail merge function to create the envelopes (my names/addresses are in an Excel spreadsheet).
    ~*~*~*~*~

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    How are you going to write your thank you notes?  Those MUST be handwritten.
    I would rather see addresses directly printed on the envelope than those horrible sticky labels.
    httpiimgurcomTCCjW0wjpg
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       I'm only sending out a few invites, but I'm printing directly on the envelopes. I realize this is technically an etiquette no-no but IMHO a victim-less crime. I figure it's more important that the post office can actually read the address than worry if someone will side-eye a printed envelope. Besides, when was the last time you remember the writing on the outside of an envelope?

       I will hand write thank you notes, but will use print instead of cursive. My cursive is awful!
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    Fairyjen1 said:
       I'm only sending out a few invites, but I'm printing directly on the envelopes. I realize this is technically an etiquette no-no but IMHO a victim-less crime. I figure it's more important that the post office can actually read the address than worry if someone will side-eye a printed envelope. Besides, when was the last time you remember the writing on the outside of an envelope?

       I will hand write thank you notes, but will use print instead of cursive. My cursive is awful!
    You will be fine.  As long as the notes are handwritten, it doesn't matter whether they are printed or cursive,
    httpiimgurcomTCCjW0wjpg
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    I asked my Mom to help with addressing my invites.  She is my Mom and is always willing to help if I ask for it.  I think asking a co-worker or some acquaintance who you think has good handwriting would be really odd, but someone like your Mom is a bit different.

    If you don't want to ask your Mom then just print directly onto the envelope.

    Remember, it is just an envelope.  It is not a piece of gold.  People will look at it to see who is invited and then rip that sucker open (and if like me will then rip it in half to destroy my address).  So don't stress too much about it.

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    I would just get a pen/pencil and use my crappy printing or cursive.  How is your FI's writing?
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    I have horrible handwriting and the act of writing causes me physical pain.  I ran my envelopes through the printer.  One hint is that none of them matched the envelope dimensions already programed into Word so I had to create a "custom document" to get the spacing right.  
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    I think you should take this opportunity to improve your penmanship! Fancy pants handwriting is always a great skill to have!
    It's not that easy.  I had private handwriting lessons as a child and while it did improve some it is still awful.  
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    There are some tricks you can use.  I put an index card with strong black lined behind a paper or envelope, and then I use the guide lines that show through the paper to keep my writing straight.  You can also do a first draft in light pencil, and then trace over your pencil lines with ink.
    httpiimgurcomTCCjW0wjpg
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    I have horrible handwriting too. I'm printing the addresses on the envelope and my FI is 100% in charge of thank you notes. He picked them out and everything. It is the one thing I've had no say in and I'm ok with that.
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    vmj23vmj23 member
    First Anniversary First Comment 5 Love Its First Answer

    I have horrible handwriting as well.  I printed addresses onto the envelopes and used clear lables for the rsvp envelopes.    As for my thank you cards (for my shower, wedding hasn't happened yet). I just took my time writing them as nicely as I could.

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    On the formatting question--did you use the mail merge feature when you tried printing your envelopes from Word?

    You might also check your printer software--some printers come with access to various templates that may help. I haven't ever needed to do this, but a graphics program like InDesign might also work if you set up a custom template.
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    kitty8403kitty8403 member
    First Comment 5 Love Its First Answer Name Dropper
    edited April 2014
    As far as whether or not to hand-write goes, I'm struggling with this one, too. I have a fair amount of wrist pain. My scrawl is LEGENDARY for general illegibility (colleagues used to ask for typed notes!) and FI somehow manages to get his even worse. I'll need to send out about 150 separate invites, and since part of my job involves setting up mailings for clients, I have a pretty good idea of just how big a pain in the tush writing out that many addresses is going to be for both me and the postlady. :-/
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    IMO it's a victimless crime if you print the address (with a nice font) directly on the envelopes if you can or if you need to make clear labels. I know I would never go "OMG, she didn't have our address handwritten on our invitation, I'm not going to that wedding."

    I had figured out a way to print on our envelopes & included our return address and did the same for the RSVP envelopes. It looked so much more elegant then I could have done and I couldn't afford to pay someone to do it either.

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    My handwriting and printing are both shaky, as a needed medication side effect.

    Yes, I will at least write out my thank you cards. Our friends and families are used to my writing so it's not hard to read.

    Envelopes however are all going through my printer. I'm the daughter of a postal worker, difficult to read addresses are evil. My printer will assure I've done everything possible to make sure the invitations get to the guests timely.

    I know on one hand it's a major etiquette breech. However, it seems worse to me to have difficult to read handwriting on an invitation.
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    I really don't understand how taking the time to design and individually print everyone's envelope is a breech of etiquette. I'm a graphic designer. I spent a heck of a lot more time thoughtfully designing the look and feel of my envelopes and how they would work with everyone's name and printing on my awesome large format printer...than if I had taken a list and written them out with my awful chicken scratch handwriting.
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    magee2011 said:
    I really don't understand how taking the time to design and individually print everyone's envelope is a breech of etiquette. I'm a graphic designer. I spent a heck of a lot more time thoughtfully designing the look and feel of my envelopes and how they would work with everyone's name and printing on my awesome large format printer...than if I had taken a list and written them out with my awful chicken scratch handwriting.
    I agree.  I've been told that they should be handwritten because it is "more personal" and shows the recipient that I really care about them.  Then I was told if I couldn't do it neatly I should hire a calligrapher so they can be handwritten.  Um, how is it "personal" if a complete stranger is addressing them to earn money?
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    mysticl said:
    magee2011 said:
    I really don't understand how taking the time to design and individually print everyone's envelope is a breech of etiquette. I'm a graphic designer. I spent a heck of a lot more time thoughtfully designing the look and feel of my envelopes and how they would work with everyone's name and printing on my awesome large format printer...than if I had taken a list and written them out with my awful chicken scratch handwriting.
    I agree.  I've been told that they should be handwritten because it is "more personal" and shows the recipient that I really care about them.  Then I was told if I couldn't do it neatly I should hire a calligrapher so they can be handwritten.  Um, how is it "personal" if a complete stranger is addressing them to earn money?
    ahaha so true! - Plus a lot of people who are invited to my wedding are also designers. I would have gotten way more side-eyed for not properly designing my envelopes to fit the look and feel of my invitations.

    Designer etiquette > Victimless wedding etiquette
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