Reception Ideas

cocktail hour without alcohol?

Would it still be called a cocktail hour if there is no alcohol served?  We are having a dry wedding so this time will be filled with a few yard games, lemonade, sweet tea, and bottled water, along with a few finger food horderves (wow, I spelled that so wrong that even spell check doesn't know what I'm trying to write!!).  If it's not "Cocktail Hour" what else would it be called?

Re: cocktail hour without alcohol?

  • JennyColadaJennyColada Awesometown, CA member
    2500 Comments 500 Love Its Third Anniversary First Answer
    You could call it a "refreshment hour"?
    ei34
  • Maggie0829Maggie0829 Ravens & Bohs & Crabs & O's member
    Eighth Anniversary 10000 Comments 500 Love Its 25 Answers
    You could call it a Social Hour.  Or you could just not call it anything.  Most guests know that there will be a hosted hour between the ceremony and the start of the reception for when pictures are taken so they really don't need a name to tell them what it is.

    CMGragain
  • I don't think anybody cares what you call it, but congratulations on the creativity and sensitivity to those who don't drink.  Best of luck in all you do.
  • You could call it a Social Hour.  Or you could just not call it anything.  Most guests know that there will be a hosted hour between the ceremony and the start of the reception for when pictures are taken so they really don't need a name to tell them what it is.
    So on the invite, would we just say "Reception immediately following" and hope everyone understands that dinner isn't being served immediately, but that they are to immediately go to the reception site?


    I don't think anybody cares what you call it, but congratulations on the creativity and sensitivity to those who don't drink.  Best of luck in all you do.
    Thanks :)  FI is the grandson of a Methodist preacher who doesn't drink and I was also raised by generations of non-drinking Methodists so we figured it was the safest and most sensitive route...especially since it is on my family property (Family farm/company of which I own 1/6...but my two uncles who don't drink each own 1/3 so I'd rather not make waves over something that I could do with or without anyway!)
  • Maggie0829Maggie0829 Ravens & Bohs & Crabs & O's member
    Eighth Anniversary 10000 Comments 500 Love Its 25 Answers
    You could call it a Social Hour.  Or you could just not call it anything.  Most guests know that there will be a hosted hour between the ceremony and the start of the reception for when pictures are taken so they really don't need a name to tell them what it is.
    So on the invite, would we just say "Reception immediately following" and hope everyone understands that dinner isn't being served immediately, but that they are to immediately go to the reception site?



    Yes.  The cocktail hour is actually part of the reception and most people will know that they will have about an hour to grab some drinks (whether alcoholic or not), grab some apps, mingle with friends, find their seats, sign the guest book and drop off their gift.

  • JennyColadaJennyColada Awesometown, CA member
    2500 Comments 500 Love Its Third Anniversary First Answer
    When invites say "reception to follow immediately" I don't read that as "dinner to follow immediately". I read it as "party to follow immediately."
  • LondonLisaLondonLisa London, UK member
    Eighth Anniversary 2500 Comments 500 Love Its 5 Answers
    If you are doing a schedule, I think it is fine to say something like:

    4pm refreshments in the garden
    5pm dinner in the ballroom

    But otherwise I would say "reception to follow" as I assume there is some sort of social hour with or without alcohol. 
  • I would definitely add soda to the menu- coke, diet coke, and sprite. And consider a fun punch to make the drink options feel a little more special than usual.
  • CC0805CC0805 member
    10 Comments 5 Love Its Name Dropper
    I love your alternative offerings! I would ask though, will your guests (other than family) know in advance that it's a dry wedding? I went to a wedding once where it was all of a sudden dry (bride blamed catering mishap) but only the BP knew. (They planned ahead and brought flasks) We still had a blast, but there was a lot of grumbling and the bride caught a lot of unnecessary grief and stress. It sounds like you're planning a fun event, wouldn't want it ruined by anyone expecting an open bar
  • CC0805CC0805 member
    10 Comments 5 Love Its Name Dropper
    Actually, the B&G had been telling everyone it was an open bar up until maybe a week before the wedding when the liquor license fell through, so yes, the guests expected an open bar. If something is openly advertised and then doesn't happen, I don't blame them for being upset.  And honestly, the only reason our group of friends knew there was no alcohol is because we went to school together and the bride had been crying about it after class when she found out.  We felt bad for her and told her we all loved her and would have fun regardless.   But if we didn't know?  I'm sure we would have been annoyed.
  • Maggie0829Maggie0829 Ravens & Bohs & Crabs & O's member
    Eighth Anniversary 10000 Comments 500 Love Its 25 Answers
    CC0805 said:
    Actually, the B&G had been telling everyone it was an open bar up until maybe a week before the wedding when the liquor license fell through, so yes, the guests expected an open bar. If something is openly advertised and then doesn't happen, I don't blame them for being upset.  And honestly, the only reason our group of friends knew there was no alcohol is because we went to school together and the bride had been crying about it after class when she found out.  We felt bad for her and told her we all loved her and would have fun regardless.   But if we didn't know?  I'm sure we would have been annoyed.
    It sucks that happened, but shit can always happen that could prevent her from serving alcohol and no one should have been pissed or disgruntled by it. Honestly, even if something is advertised I don't fully expect it until I am at the event and see it with my own eyes. Because I know that things can come up that can cause plans to change.

  • CC0805 said:
    I love your alternative offerings! I would ask though, will your guests (other than family) know in advance that it's a dry wedding? I went to a wedding once where it was all of a sudden dry (bride blamed catering mishap) but only the BP knew. (They planned ahead and brought flasks) We still had a blast, but there was a lot of grumbling and the bride caught a lot of unnecessary grief and stress. It sounds like you're planning a fun event, wouldn't want it ruined by anyone expecting an open bar
    I'm sorry but the guests in your example were rude as fuck to grumble and complain that no alcohol was provided.  Alcohol is not a requirement, nor do you need to let your guests know that your wedding is dry ahead of time.  A guest should not go to a wedding expecting certain things but just be grateful for what is provided.
    I have to agree.  Many people do know, and most others probably assume because they know my family and the location.  I would hope my guests aren't coming just to drink.  I also think it's rude to bring a flask to a dry wedding...it's dry for a reason.  I would be beyond embarrassed/mortified if anyone started to mix drinks, especially if they started getting tipsy and acting dumb ... Not to mention it would definitely piss off my uncles, whose property we will be on!

  • CC0805 said:

    I love your alternative offerings! I would ask though, will your guests (other than family) know in advance that it's a dry wedding? I went to a wedding once where it was all of a sudden dry (bride blamed catering mishap) but only the BP knew. (They planned ahead and brought flasks) We still had a blast, but there was a lot of grumbling and the bride caught a lot of unnecessary grief and stress. It sounds like you're planning a fun event, wouldn't want it ruined by anyone expecting an open bar

    I'm sorry but the guests in your example were rude as fuck to grumble and complain that no alcohol was provided.  Alcohol is not a requirement, nor do you need to let your guests know that your wedding is dry ahead of time.  A guest should not go to a wedding expecting certain things but just be grateful for what is provided.

    While this is true, I don't think it's wrong to exprct alcohol though at weddings, esp if having alcohol at weddings is the norm in your social circle. Every wedding I have been to has served alcohol. It would be weird and unexpected for me to go one without it. I would certainly still go but I dont think it's wrong to expect but just dont complain about it while you are there.
    Wedding Countdown Ticker
This discussion has been closed.
Choose Another Board
Search Boards