Wedding Invitations & Paper

what type of paper is better for invitations?

matte, heavy matte, elite texture or elegant shimmer?
Those or the options for my invitations but don't know what the differences are.

Re: what type of paper is better for invitations?

  • "Better" is subjective. There is no right answer. Can you order samples of each to see which you like the best? It also depends how you want to print on them, ie matte looks best with letterpress.

    Personally, I went with a moire with gold foil embossing mounted to shimmer cardstock.

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    doeydo
  • I doesn't matter unless you're printing them yourself or taking them to a printer on your own. If you are ordering from an invitation company who print them themselves, then pick whichever you like the best. If you are getting them printed elsewhere, though, then I would go with one of the matte options. Shimmery paper can be difficult to print on--it usually requires a laser printer, due to the finish on the paper, and even then the ink can flake off.

    Same goes for weight. The heavier the paper the harder it is to feed though a standard printer, but if you take it to a professional printer, then it shouldn't matter.
  • I would go with something heavier than 110 lb or 10 point...but it depends on the paper. I'll be printing mine on an 80 lb pearlized carstock, only because it's silver. If I didn't want to go with a silver invitation I would use 12 pt. matte (only because the matte stock we carry at work has a slight coating on it and it's the thickest paper in house).
  • fe31fe31 member
    First Comment First Anniversary
    This was a good question.  I was browsing at invitations last night, and I was clueless as to the differences in paper.
  • I'd use a paper or cardstock that absorbs ink well so it doesn't run or smear. With a shiny surface the possibility of these things happening go up.
  • Jen4948 said:
    I'd use a paper or cardstock that absorbs ink well so it doesn't run or smear. With a shiny surface the possibility of these things happening go up.
    This is only an issue for home printing though, and for RSVP cards since people will be writing on them with pen. Foil embossing, thermography, letterpress, debossing done professionally won't have this problem.

    For home printing though, I agree and would go with a smooth, matte cardstock.

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  • Ok,  thank you
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