Wedding Invitations & Paper

Invitation wording-Brides parents and groom's divorced dad hosting

I was wondering if anyone would have some suggestions for handling a tricky wedding invitation situation.  My parents are hosting in slight combination with the groom's dad (60% my parents, 30% grooms dad, 10% us).  How should the wedding invitations be worded?  Groom's mom is not contributing and is not likely to attend it seems, though she will be invited.  

Would "John and Cora Washington request your presence at the marriage of their daughter Anabelle to Christopher Potratz, son of James Portatz..." be okay?

Re: Invitation wording-Brides parents and groom's divorced dad hosting

  • CMGragainCMGragain member
    10000 Comments 500 Love Its Fourth Anniversary 25 Answers
    edited April 2015
    Hosting is not the same as paying.  If your FFIL feels he is really co-hosting, it would be this:

    Mr. and Mrs. John Bridesparents
    Mr. George Groomsfather
    request the pleasure of your company  (honour of your presence for church)
    at the marriage of
    Bride's Full Name
    and
    Groom's Full Name
    Day, date
    time o'clock
    Venue
    Address
    City, State

    The wording in your example lists only your parents as hosts.  The "son of" line is not traditional., and it serves no purpose whatever.
    httpiimgurcomTCCjW0wjpg
  • Jen4948Jen4948 Houston member
    10000 Comments Seventh Anniversary 500 Love Its 25 Answers
    Karryna said:

    I was wondering if anyone would have some suggestions for handling a tricky wedding invitation situation.  My parents are hosting in slight combination with the groom's dad (60% my parents, 30% grooms dad, 10% us).  How should the wedding invitations be worded?  Groom's mom is not contributing and is not likely to attend it seems, though she will be invited.  


    Would "John and Cora Washington request your presence at the marriage of their daughter Anabelle to Christopher Potratz, son of James Portatz..." be okay?
    Who's hosting is not determined by who's paying for what. The financial arrangements are none of the guests' business.

    They are determined by establishing who the "point persons" of the wedding are. The "point persons" issue the invitations, receive the replies, greet the guests, and make the arrangements that ensure that the guests' needs are attended to. The invitation is a communication from them requesting that the recipient attend the wedding. It's not a program, playbill, or family tree. Only the recipient is "honored" by the invitation.

    That said, if your FI wants to be listed as "son of" his father on the invitation and it may not be a hill you want to die on. While it isn't traditional, it also may not make any difference.
    CMGragain
  • ILoveBeachMusicILoveBeachMusic Indiana member
    2500 Comments Fifth Anniversary 500 Love Its 5 Answers
    Actually, according to the Crane's Wedding Etiquette book "son of" is a traditional and proper way of including the grooms parents on the invitation. We just went through this with my daughter's invitations. Her fiance's parents aren't hosting but are being included on the invitation.
    bellefemme12
  • CMGragainCMGragain member
    10000 Comments 500 Love Its Fourth Anniversary 25 Answers
    edited April 2015

    Actually, according to the Crane's Wedding Etiquette book "son of" is a traditional and proper way of including the grooms parents on the invitation. We just went through this with my daughter's invitations. Her fiance's parents aren't hosting but are being included on the invitation.

    The "son of" wording does not include anyone.  It serves no purpose.  The wedding invitation is a formal note from the hosts to the guests, giving them the important information of who, what, when and where.  The only people who are "included" on an invitation are the people who receive it.
    It is not an etiquette crime to use the son of line, but it is not traditional and serves no function.  It is a bit of an insult to the groom to imply that people won't know who he is unless his parents' names are on the invitation.

    Jewish wedding invitations do include both sets of parents.  This is a Jewish tradition.  Hispanic wedding invitations are also traditionally issued by both families, and are often in two languages.

    I cannot find the information you reference.  Please show me where you read this.  It is NOT on their website!

    httpiimgurcomTCCjW0wjpg
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