Photos and Video

Model Release- Photography

I have a question regarding the model release on our photography contract. I understand that this is normal for all wedding photography contracts, but I am wondering if anyone has worked to have their reworded or taken out for privacy? 

My fiance and I are both very private people. Neither of us are on social media. We feel uncomfortable that our pictures would be posted on Facebook when neither of us are on Facebook ourselves. Although unlikely that this would happen, I don't feel comfortable that they could use the pictures as advertisements as well. 

I certainly don't want to overreact, I just want to make sure that we feel comfortable before signing the contract. Does anyone have any tips on how I should ask it to be worded or if this request is outrageous?

Thank you!

Re: Model Release- Photography

  • photokittyphotokitty where I want to be
    Moderator Knottie Warrior 5000 Comments 500 Love Its
    mod
    I have a question regarding the model release on our photography contract. I understand that this is normal for all wedding photography contracts, but I am wondering if anyone has worked to have their reworded or taken out for privacy? 

    My fiance and I are both very private people. Neither of us are on social media. We feel uncomfortable that our pictures would be posted on Facebook when neither of us are on Facebook ourselves. Although unlikely that this would happen, I don't feel comfortable that they could use the pictures as advertisements as well. 

    I certainly don't want to overreact, I just want to make sure that we feel comfortable before signing the contract. Does anyone have any tips on how I should ask it to be worded or if this request is outrageous?

    Thank you!
    It is common for the photog to retain the rights to use the images for advertising the photog's business. Most photogs have a heavy social media presence, specifically on FB. 

    You can usually pay an additional to have the full and exclusive rights to your images - this can be very pricey. Celebrities typically go this route. 

    I would never sign a release that allows for the images to be sold for 3rd party advertising. Meaning the photog could sell them as clip art, etc. I think it is not a big deal to be posted on their FB page or on their images at a Bridal show etc. 

    In reality, it's highly likely that photos from your wedding will be posted online by your guests. 

    I think it's fine to ask, nut don't surprised if the photog wants to be compensated for not being able to use them to advertise his business. GL!
    :kiss: ~xoxo~ :kiss:

  • I would find out more details on how your photos would be used. Would the be on the photographers facebook page, or just their website, or would it be just for their professional profile to show potential clients when they come in to meet? Knowing exactley where the photos may end up may make a difference on how you want to deal with this. I would also explain to your photographer you desire to remain private.

    But keep in mind, there is a good chance you will still end up on facebook as guests at your wedding may take photos and post them.

    sparklepants41
  • Erikan73 said:

    I would find out more details on how your photos would be used. Would the be on the photographers facebook page, or just their website, or would it be just for their professional profile to show potential clients when they come in to meet? Knowing exactley where the photos may end up may make a difference on how you want to deal with this. I would also explain to your photographer you desire to remain private.

    But keep in mind, there is a good chance you will still end up on facebook as guests at your wedding may take photos and post them.

    Definitely agree.

    You may also want to find out if the photos are used to promote the photog's business in the future, are your names mentioned anywhere? For example: "Jane & Joe" or "Smith Wedding" or "Jane & Joe Smith" etc.

    If you are more uncomfortable about having your names out there along with your photos because it's easier for people to find these pics in an online search, ask the photog if you can simply alter the contract to allow use of the photos but without names. This way, you are not spending a ton of money to purchase full & exclusive rights as PP mentioned, but you are still preserving your privacy.

  • The reason the photographer wants you to sign a model release is so that they can use the images they take at your wedding as examples of their work for future clients.  Imagine trying to pick a photographer without any examples of their work- it would be impossible.  I'm sure you looked through your photographers work before chosing them, and in a sense that's "advertising" because it's selling their work to you to get hired for your event.  

    I would discuss the terms of the contract with your photographer and voice your concerns. If you are concerned about someone being able to search for you on the internet and get a visual of what you look like, ask your photographer not to use your names. Maybe give permission to use your images in their portfolio, but not on facebook?  

    Unfortunately there is little privacy nowadays.  But without your names, the only people who will recognize you are your friends and family or someone who actually knows you- but strangers will just see you as another happy couple getting married and that's about it.  
  • I had these same concerns when we picked our photographer!  I was really nervous about bringing the issue up, but our photographer was (luckily) very understanding and willing to work with us.

    We agreed that she can post them on her social media (without tagging us) and on her blog, since those are incredibly important to her business.  But she wrote into the contract that she would not use them on third party sites, which was really my biggest concern.

    She offered not to use our real names when she posts them, which we still may do.  
  • Choosing a photographer that doesn't keep copyright is important, but more so that you have the rights to your images.  If they keep the copyright, they will post them to a site where you have to purchase the images from them. You might be able to get the watermarked images, but if you don't want the watermark (who would?) you would have to pay for the images. So whatever they quote you for their services will most likely not include the cost to get the images from them. Read the contract thoroughly and look out for this, and don't hesitate to ask questions.  

    Getting the copyright to your images doesn't necessarily mean that they can't be posted to social media or their own website.  A friend of mine went with a photographer that gave them the copyright to all of the images but the images were posted the vendor's facebook page.  

    I wanted to avoid this situation at all costs, so I'm using a former coworker as my photographer. I know that the images won't be used for advertising (he does this on the side), they will remain private and they won't have a watermark.  He is also giving me all of the images taken that day all touched up and on a flash drive.  Fortunately working in the photo industry has given me a lot of insite into this topic.

    For a very good explanation of copyright and you wedding day photos, check out this link:

    Just ignore the end part where they are trying to sell their services...

  • @klk111425 is on the right track but copyrights are not the same as reprint rights.  Almost all photographers today grant reprint rights to the couple (hence why we're all so eager to get our USB/DVD of images) so the couple may make as many unwatermarked prints of the images as they like for personal use (ie to share with your family and friends or to put on your personal Facebook page).  Most photographers will not give up the copyrights to the images without a massive fee as the actual image is their intellectual property, just like a writer wouldn't let you print a copy of their novel and sell it for your own profit.  The photographer generally retains rights to use images in marketing capacities while you cannot use them for any monetary/personal gain without notifying the photographer.  If you want to submit them to Style Me Pretty or a contest page or to advertise your floral business since you did all your bouquets, the photographer must okay it.  The actual images remain the photographers property.  You can negotiate your contract with the photographer to state how he may use the images (on his blog without names or at a wedding show or in a print ad for his business but not to be resold to a third party; or that she'll give you notice prior to using the images) but ultimately if you're not happy with how the photos will be used by the photographer you need to pick another photographer.  I also find it interesting that people get caught up in the model clause in a wedding photography contract.  It's there every time you have a professional photo taken.  The studio/photographer retains the right to use your photo in their marketing with or without informing you.

    lachattefatale
  • CharmedPamCharmedPam Chicagoburbs
    1000 Comments 500 Love Its Third Anniversary First Answer
    member
    klk111415!  I just asked about this, but that link helps out a lot!

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