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Gofundme for Honeymoon/home buying

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Re: Gofundme for Honeymoon/home buying

  • Oh gosh @glasgowtolondon, I don't know the exchange rate, but it would've cost me about $9,000 a year if I'd went to my local community college, for tuition.  

    Add in that college degrees are being required for work that really doesn't need them.  One of my best managers ever was the general manager of a kitchen gadget store.  When the store closed (the mall rent was insane), another store in the mall tried to recruit her for an associate manager position.  Then corporate wouldn't let them hire her because she didn't have a degree.  

    But yeah, a gofundme for super expensive private school loans is awful.
    charlotte989875
  • We forget that higher education is increasing at rates faster than inflation.   I think we are going to find that the game can't continue as it stands.   

    Then again, the living arrangements in many universities are better than country clubs.  
    charlotte989875ILoveBeachMusic
  • Cookie PusherCookie Pusher Looking over your shoulder member
    Seventh Anniversary 2500 Comments 500 Love Its 5 Answers
    My younger sister went to the same college I did (a state school), just 12 years later. Tuition with room and board was nearly double what I paid.
    ~*~*~*~*~

  • MCmeow said:
    I think I've "liked" the last 10 or so posts about student loans. MCmeow said:
    What do you guys think about go fund me pages for paying student loans? I have a cousin doing that who isn't really struggling at all. We're in NYC where there are great public colleges (I went to a CUNY school and most Architecture firms prefer CUNY graduates, we're good!). But he decided to go out of state which is of course more expensive, but it was his dream so no judgement. But now he set up a page because he can't pay his loans and have an internship in his field at the same time. Which of course sucks (Fingers crossed for Bernie to win) but it seems wrong to me, to ask people to pay for your schooling when much of that side of the family couldn't have a college education in the first place. There are some great repayment options until he gets on his feet ?_?.
    What really gets me... On top of the loan forgiveness and income based repayment plans already out there, you are suggesting that asking people to pay for schooling is wrong but it's totes ok if the government pays for it. I could ask Mom and Dad to pay my tuition bills with money they earned, or I could ask the collective federal taxpaying population to contribute towards my needlessly expensive-ass education. 
    NO.
    Money doesn't grow on trees people, the government does not generate money. It takes money from other people and redistributes it. 
    Yup, I do believe the government should pay for public schooling, not private institutions which the media loves to incorrectly state. Bernie has said a million times he wants to make public college free. I've always believed the US should look to European countries and copy some policies. The US is way behind on how citizens are treated and it makes me sad that Americans rather pay for war through taxes than a poor kid's college education. Invest in poor kids and there will be less Americans on welfare.
    I don't disagree with the theory about making public college free, but part of the reason private institutions exist is because public doesn't get the job done. It's not just, "Here kid have $10k and go to your local CC," or increasing funding to each CC to accommodate the slew of seats needed. I would love to see the math on encouraging people to attend CC and the investment dollars, not to mention the sheer control to ensure ROI (as it would be far above and beyond the regulations public entities already face, requiring more legal experts to manage all of it)... all that versus the current system of allowing each person to choose the best institution for themselves and take out a loan or receive grants to do it. 
    Choice. 

    And oh yeah, I'd love to see if any of our Great Britain friends here can chime in, because last I knew "free" college failed in England and people are paying tuition.
    At some point you run out of other people's money.
    It isn't a simple answer.

    University tuition in scotland is still free, it is heavily subsidised by the scottish government.
    You do pay a graduation tax of about £2k at the end which you can either add to your student loans or pay in full. England has had fees for a long time (all my English uni friends paid fees at my Scottish university back in 2001), but in the last few years has increased them significantly. I don't know how the US system works, here you can take out loans for your tuition so it's not that it has to be paid up front in every case*.

    I'm interested to know if your definition of failed is because the goverment decided university fees was a prime area on which to focus their budget cuts, or that free or subsidised education in and of itself didn't work?

    The young in this country are virtually ignored by the government as they don't have the kind of voting power that the older voter has. I'm sure it is similar in the US. My view is that education is a right for all. We increasing live in a world where a degree in literally anything is a bare minimum requirement for a foot in the door. I don't think our younger generation deserve to be crippled with debt just to compete on a playing field for which they did not make the rules. For me it all reeks of a generation that got the benefit of all the best britain had to offer pulling up the ladder behind them. Yes, the money has to come from somewhere, but I think education should be one of the priorities. Our government could choose to cut other things, but university students don't give them the voter turn out they need. 

    *as always, there are exceptions. I'm the first to admit I'm no expert.
    Amen sister xx
    Wedding Countdown Ticker





    glasgowtolondon
  • ViczaesarViczaesar Central Coast, CA member
    Ninth Anniversary 5000 Comments 500 Love Its First Answer
    banana468 said:
    We forget that higher education is increasing at rates faster than inflation.   I think we are going to find that the game can't continue as it stands.   

    Then again, the living arrangements in many universities are better than country clubs.  
    What do you mean by that?



  • ViczaesarViczaesar Central Coast, CA member
    Ninth Anniversary 5000 Comments 500 Love Its First Answer
    My younger sister went to the same college I did (a state school), just 12 years later. Tuition with room and board was nearly double what I paid.
    I'm back at the same university where I did my BA (went away for MA, came back for PhD).  In 2001 when I started tuition was $4K/year.  When I graduated in 2005 it was about $5K/year.  Now it's about $15K/year.  It tripled in 10 years.



  • Viczaesar said:
    banana468 said:
    We forget that higher education is increasing at rates faster than inflation.   I think we are going to find that the game can't continue as it stands.   

    Then again, the living arrangements in many universities are better than country clubs.  
    What do you mean by that?
    Some living arrangements offer laundry service and suite living with private bathrooms among others.   Then the gyms are state of the art as well.  It's great to have but comes at a cost.  
  • banana468 said:
    Viczaesar said:
    banana468 said:
    We forget that higher education is increasing at rates faster than inflation.   I think we are going to find that the game can't continue as it stands.   

    Then again, the living arrangements in many universities are better than country clubs.  
    What do you mean by that?
    Some living arrangements offer laundry service and suite living with private bathrooms among others.   Then the gyms are state of the art as well.  It's great to have but comes at a cost.  
    Ugh, even the basics are crazy expensive.  My spot in a double dorm with shared bathroom and no ac was $4000.  So total rent for the room was about the same as what we pay for our 2 bed townhouse with basement and garage 3 miles from the same university.  And it was mandatory to live on campus as a freshman.  And if you lived on campus, the dining plan, also another $4,000, was mandatory too.  
    SP29
  • kimmiinthemittenkimmiinthemitten Detroit, MI member
    2500 Comments 500 Love Its Third Anniversary 5 Answers
    Let's not also forget, that the federal government profits off of the taxes received from student loans (to the tune of 66 billion over 6 years as of October 2015).  

    So 3 +decades ago, students went to subsidized schools, minimum wage earners could afford tuition with their basic jobs, and graduated. They evenutally became the bosses, and started mandating that more jobs required degrees. Hell, many McDonalds won't hire an 18+ now without a GED.  

    Then the government pulled its funding, tuition soared, and the government collects big from the backs of the same people it willingly put into this debt.  Think about what 66 billion dollars could do for the economy if it was in those people's pockets?  They would buy cars and homes and food and furniture. Instead, we have people renting in groups or living at home to make ends meet. 
    image
    charlotte989875
  • Let's not also forget, that the federal government profits off of the taxes received from student loans (to the tune of 66 billion over 6 years as of October 2015).  

    So 3 +decades ago, students went to subsidized schools, minimum wage earners could afford tuition with their basic jobs, and graduated. They evenutally became the bosses, and started mandating that more jobs required degrees. Hell, many McDonalds won't hire an 18+ now without a GED.  

    Then the government pulled its funding, tuition soared, and the government collects big from the backs of the same people it willingly put into this debt.  Think about what 66 billion dollars could do for the economy if it was in those people's pockets?  They would buy cars and homes and food and furniture. Instead, we have people renting in groups or living at home to make ends meet. 
    Not to mention, the government is contracting these federal loans out to private companies (Navient), which then make a profit off the loans. Years ago, putting people looking for an education into tens of thousands of dollars into debt for profit was not a business model subsidized by the US government. Student loan interest rates were very low, and covered the cost of servicing the loans, not high profits. 

    Now, instead of a lot of money going into cars and houses and other purchases that drive the economy, they're going into student loan interest. It's a mess. 
    kimmiinthemittencharlotte989875
  • LondonLisaLondonLisa London, UK member
    Seventh Anniversary 2500 Comments 500 Love Its 5 Answers
    edited March 2016
    MCmeow said:
    I think I've "liked" the last 10 or so posts about student loans. MCmeow said:
    What do you guys think about go fund me pages for paying student loans? I have a cousin doing that who isn't really struggling at all. We're in NYC where there are great public colleges (I went to a CUNY school and most Architecture firms prefer CUNY graduates, we're good!). But he decided to go out of state which is of course more expensive, but it was his dream so no judgement. But now he set up a page because he can't pay his loans and have an internship in his field at the same time. Which of course sucks (Fingers crossed for Bernie to win) but it seems wrong to me, to ask people to pay for your schooling when much of that side of the family couldn't have a college education in the first place. There are some great repayment options until he gets on his feet ?_?.
    What really gets me... On top of the loan forgiveness and income based repayment plans already out there, you are suggesting that asking people to pay for schooling is wrong but it's totes ok if the government pays for it. I could ask Mom and Dad to pay my tuition bills with money they earned, or I could ask the collective federal taxpaying population to contribute towards my needlessly expensive-ass education. 
    NO.
    Money doesn't grow on trees people, the government does not generate money. It takes money from other people and redistributes it. 
    Yup, I do believe the government should pay for public schooling, not private institutions which the media loves to incorrectly state. Bernie has said a million times he wants to make public college free. I've always believed the US should look to European countries and copy some policies. The US is way behind on how citizens are treated and it makes me sad that Americans rather pay for war through taxes than a poor kid's college education. Invest in poor kids and there will be less Americans on welfare.
    I don't disagree with the theory about making public college free, but part of the reason private institutions exist is because public doesn't get the job done. It's not just, "Here kid have $10k and go to your local CC," or increasing funding to each CC to accommodate the slew of seats needed. I would love to see the math on encouraging people to attend CC and the investment dollars, not to mention the sheer control to ensure ROI (as it would be far above and beyond the regulations public entities already face, requiring more legal experts to manage all of it)... all that versus the current system of allowing each person to choose the best institution for themselves and take out a loan or receive grants to do it. 
    Choice. 

    And oh yeah, I'd love to see if any of our Great Britain friends here can chime in, because last I knew "free" college failed in England and people are paying tuition.
    At some point you run out of other people's money.
    Hardly "failed", more like a conservative government railroaded increased fees it through parliament. So if you pay (and that is a big if, as your parents must earn over a certain amount) the maximum one can pay is £9,000 a year (so like US$13,000) a year. The loans one can take out are also heavily government subsidised, interest is tied to inflation (so right now it is 0.9%), and one only pays when they make over a certain amount. One also only pays on what is calculated as their disposable income, not essential income, so one doesn't have to choose between paying rent and paying for university. 

    Also, due to the specialised nature of UK education, most bachelor's degrees are 3 years, not 4.




    kimmiinthemittenkylexoscrunchythiefcharlotte989875
  • thisismynickname2thisismynickname2 City By The Lake member
    5000 Comments Sixth Anniversary 500 Love Its First Answer
    Thanks for clarifying how things in GB work! I was over there on vacation a few years back when there were riots over this, so I had an impression the situation on paying tuition or fees had worsened and that's what I meant by "failed." So often in the US, people say, "Well look at Europe blah blah blah," and my usual point is that "Europe" (as a sweeping generalization) isn't the Utopia people think it is. 
    I also work in higher ed and very much believe in its importance, for sure. But, that's also why I know the politicians' rhetoric about "free" college is a load of crap. Personally, I would much rather see a far more significant investment in k-12 education. K-12 education has been shown to be behind comparable countries in the rest of the world. K-12 is already "free" in the US and trying to correct its ills by giving people more free education isn't the solution. 
    Higher ed in the US has a lot of problems that need fixing. Just giving people easier access to a flawed system won't do much for them.
    I think the one place we can start is the loan system. Income-based repayment as a general idea is good (current system still has flaws but we're headed in the right direction). I happen to be a fan of the public service loan forgiveness, with the idea that the salary gap offsets what one would pay back for the education. 
    Anyway, I can talk about higher ed until the cows come home so stepping down now. 
    ________________________________


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