Attire & Accessories Forum

Ring Cleaner

Hi Everyone--

I'm looking for some recommendations on an at home ring cleaner. My ring is from Kay's and I was told that for "deep cleaning" they send them out and it takes up to 2 weeks to get it back. And they recommend you do not wear it until the wedding once you do get it back. After all the bad press Kay's had recently, I'm leery on sending it out just for cleaning...especially so close to the wedding. Does anyone have anything they swear by to get their rings super sparkly?

Thanks!! :)

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Re: Ring Cleaner

  • bleve0821bleve0821 The Shire member
    1000 Comments 500 Love Its Third Anniversary First Answer
    I know someone who swears by the overnight denture cleanser, though I've never tried it.  Usually, I let it soak in warm water with a little dishsoap for 20-30 minutes, wipe it clean with a soft rag, rinse it under warm water.  It gets it nice and sparkly.

    When I'm in a pinch, though, I use the diamond dazzle stik, which also does a nice job on the diamonds.  None of these remove the scratches if there are any in the platinum; I usually go to a trusted jeweler for that (NOT Kay's), but I don't show many people the band so that's a once a year or longer kind of thing.


    "And when they use our atoms to make new lives, they won’t just be able to take one, they’ll have to take two, one of you and one of me..."
    --Philip Pullman

    SoldiersMom
  • Thank you, @AtomicBlonde! Denture cleaner seems like a good idea because of the bubbles. How clever!
    Daisypath Wedding tickers
  • Um, why would they have to send your ring somewhere to clean it? The Kay's in the mall near me has an ultrasonic cleaner, and if your chain stores don't have them a locally-owned jeweler ought to. I luckily work for a jewelry designer, so I can pop my rings in the ultrasonic whenever I like, but at home I use gentle liquid soap (like Dial) and warm water, with a soft toothbrush if I need to get out stuck dirt. Dry thoroughly with a towel before wearing. At-home ultrasonic devices are also available online if you're looking for a professional type clean, but follow the directions and don't put anything delicate in there (for example, emeralds, opals, pearls).
    image
  • SP29SP29 member
    Sixth Anniversary 2500 Comments 500 Love Its 5 Answers
    I would go to a local jeweler. Most places can clean it on the spot (I don't know if you have People's, but they clean it with the ultrasonic cleaner in the store, right in front of you).

    My e-ring came with jewelry cleaner, so I use that every once in awhile (and I haven't done it in AWHILE).
  • I don't mean to thread jack, but since some of you seem to know this stuff, would you clean an Aquamarine gem the same way?  I usually just use soap and a toothbrush.  

    SaveSave
  • Aquamarines are basically blue colored emeralds, and like emeralds, they are prone to scratching and fractures.  The jewelry cleaner shouldn't hurt them.  I wouldn't use anything that is abrasive, though, like toothpaste.
    httpiimgurcomTCCjW0wjpg
  • @artbyallie I'm not sure why they would need to send it out for cleaning. That's just what I was told when I asked the last time I was in there to have it "inspected" for the warranty. When I do take it every six months to be looked at, they do use the ultrasonic cleaner on it, but when I asked the sales woman I used the term "deep cleaning" and she said they send them out for that.

    What I meant by "deep cleaning" was the regular cleaning, plus maybe some polishing of the band. Nothing extreme lol. Maybe I should have chosen my words more carefully.

    Daisypath Wedding tickers
  • bleve0821bleve0821 The Shire member
    1000 Comments 500 Love Its Third Anniversary First Answer
    When I went in to get my rings cleaned before the wedding, the jeweler asked if I wanted them rhodium plated (or finished, can't remember).  What that does, to my understanding, is make the band look like it's brand new (polish it, get the scratches out, protects it).  My jeweler can do it in-house, but it does take a day or two, so I suspect a place like your in-mall Kay's would have to send it out.  They may have assumed you wanted the metal refinished/sealed/idk what they call it.


    "And when they use our atoms to make new lives, they won’t just be able to take one, they’ll have to take two, one of you and one of me..."
    --Philip Pullman

  • That's a good tip for after the wedding. Thanks @AtomicBlonde!
    Daisypath Wedding tickers
  • @artbyallie I'm not sure why they would need to send it out for cleaning. That's just what I was told when I asked the last time I was in there to have it "inspected" for the warranty. When I do take it every six months to be looked at, they do use the ultrasonic cleaner on it, but when I asked the sales woman I used the term "deep cleaning" and she said they send them out for that.

    What I meant by "deep cleaning" was the regular cleaning, plus maybe some polishing of the band. Nothing extreme lol. Maybe I should have chosen my words more carefully.

    Is your ring insured?  I had a bracelet through a jewelry chain and when they closed all the stores in my area they told me to keep up my warranty I would either have to drive over an hour or mail them my tennis bracelet.  I was absolutely not mailing a diamond bracelet... I had insurance on the bracelet and made sure the insurance covered what the warranty did and then just let it lapse.    I wouldn't use Kay at all either after some of the horror stories. Like others have said, any jewelry store will clean it (and whatever else you have on!) for you if you ask.

    I used dish soap and warm water with a soft toothbrush at home and the last time I took it to get it cleaned/checked at a store the guy suggested using windex instead. He said that dish soap being thick, leaves a residue.  Again, probably a terrible idea for softer stones though.
    STARMOON44
  • CMGragainCMGragain member
    10000 Comments 500 Love Its Fourth Anniversary 25 Answers
    edited August 2016
    "Deep cleaning?" 
    Diamonds are not porous.  They do not absorb other materials.  Their surfaces are either clean, or they are not.
    Metals such as 14K gold do not absorb other materials, but they can tarnish over a long time.  Also, "white gold" is really rhodium plating, and the plating will wear off over time and needs to be redone.  None of this should be relevant for a ring during the first year of ownership.
    You should clean your rings when needed.  "Ultrasonic" cleaners clean by vibrating the rings in jewelry cleaner.  There is nothing special about this.  You can do just as good a job at home with a toothbrush and cleaner.  Would you wear a dirty dress?  No?  Then don't wear dirty jewelry.
    The prongs holding in the stones on your rings will wear away over time.  This is why you should have your jeweler check them once a year.  I had to have the prongs replaced on my ring after 25 years.  They can also be tightened if knocked loose.  This has nothing to do with cleaning.
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  • SP29SP29 member
    Sixth Anniversary 2500 Comments 500 Love Its 5 Answers
    CMGragain said:
    I used to work in the jewelry business.  I use a squirt of dishwashing liquid, a couple of squirts of Windex, and 1/4 cup water.  Stir in a cup and heat for 20 seconds in microwave.  Then drop in your rings.  Do NOT microwave your rings!  (Not for opals, pearls, turquoise!)  After a 20 minute soak, scrub rings with an old toothbrush, then rinse in clear water.  Works great and saves money.  My rings are 40 years old.
    Advice on sapphires? I understand they are softer, so one has to be more careful (I think that is it anyway- I had a loose prong and tried to take it to a local jewelry store who said they couldn't do it in house because they aren't comfortable with sapphires and can crack the stone easily).
  • CMGragainCMGragain member
    10000 Comments 500 Love Its Fourth Anniversary 25 Answers
    edited August 2016
    Sapphires are quite hard, but some have been coated to enhance their color.  This may have been why the jewelry store was reluctant to accept your ring.  I am surprised to hear this, though.
    httpiimgurcomTCCjW0wjpg
  • SP29SP29 member
    Sixth Anniversary 2500 Comments 500 Love Its 5 Answers
    CMGragain said:
    Sapphires are quite hard, but some have been coated to enhance their color.  This may have been why the jewelry store was reluctant to accept your ring.  I am surprised to hear this, though.
    Mine isn't coated. I thought it was weird too. They said they'd have to send it away because the machine/tool/whatever they use, while fine for use on a diamond, would be a risk for cracking a sapphire when tightening the prongs.

    I ended up sending it back to the company it was bought from (Brilliant Earth), and they are great. But it's a bit of a chore because I have to ship it to/from the US, which is also scary that it could get lost.

    I'll have to do some searching, because there must be a true jeweler around who knows how to work with various metals/stones.
  • ILoveBeachMusicILoveBeachMusic Indiana member
    Eighth Anniversary 2500 Comments 500 Love Its 5 Answers
    SP29 said:
    CMGragain said:
    I used to work in the jewelry business.  I use a squirt of dishwashing liquid, a couple of squirts of Windex, and 1/4 cup water.  Stir in a cup and heat for 20 seconds in microwave.  Then drop in your rings.  Do NOT microwave your rings!  (Not for opals, pearls, turquoise!)  After a 20 minute soak, scrub rings with an old toothbrush, then rinse in clear water.  Works great and saves money.  My rings are 40 years old.
    Advice on sapphires? I understand they are softer, so one has to be more careful (I think that is it anyway- I had a loose prong and tried to take it to a local jewelry store who said they couldn't do it in house because they aren't comfortable with sapphires and can crack the stone easily).
    I have a sapphire and diamond ring. My jeweler steam cleans both the bands and the e-ring. Sapphires are just about as hard as diamonds so they are hard to damage. I use a toothbrush and a little toothpaste in between jeweler cleanings. Years ago,I heard Elizabeth Taylor say that was the best way to clean diamonds and figured she would know LOL!
    SP29
  • SP29 said:
    CMGragain said:
    Sapphires are quite hard, but some have been coated to enhance their color.  This may have been why the jewelry store was reluctant to accept your ring.  I am surprised to hear this, though.
    Mine isn't coated. I thought it was weird too. They said they'd have to send it away because the machine/tool/whatever they use, while fine for use on a diamond, would be a risk for cracking a sapphire when tightening the prongs.

    I ended up sending it back to the company it was bought from (Brilliant Earth), and they are great. But it's a bit of a chore because I have to ship it to/from the US, which is also scary that it could get lost.

    I'll have to do some searching, because there must be a true jeweler around who knows how to work with various metals/stones.
    Yeah, not remotely true. Was it a chain store? Sapphires are actually less prone to being cracked/chipped than diamonds because they do not have the same properties of cleavage. They also can handle nearly as high temps as diamond and do not need to be removed for repairs involving soldering with a jeweler's torch. "Master Jeweler" is the technical qualification you're looking for, if you need to ask about a given store's bench jeweler.
    image
    SP29
  • I agree with @artbyalie.    Find another jeweler - one who does in-house work.
    httpiimgurcomTCCjW0wjpg
  • SP29SP29 member
    Sixth Anniversary 2500 Comments 500 Love Its 5 Answers
    SP29 said:
    CMGragain said:
    Sapphires are quite hard, but some have been coated to enhance their color.  This may have been why the jewelry store was reluctant to accept your ring.  I am surprised to hear this, though.
    Mine isn't coated. I thought it was weird too. They said they'd have to send it away because the machine/tool/whatever they use, while fine for use on a diamond, would be a risk for cracking a sapphire when tightening the prongs.

    I ended up sending it back to the company it was bought from (Brilliant Earth), and they are great. But it's a bit of a chore because I have to ship it to/from the US, which is also scary that it could get lost.

    I'll have to do some searching, because there must be a true jeweler around who knows how to work with various metals/stones.
    Yeah, not remotely true. Was it a chain store? Sapphires are actually less prone to being cracked/chipped than diamonds because they do not have the same properties of cleavage. They also can handle nearly as high temps as diamond and do not need to be removed for repairs involving soldering with a jeweler's torch. "Master Jeweler" is the technical qualification you're looking for, if you need to ask about a given store's bench jeweler.
    I think I asked 2 places. One was a chain, one wasn't.

    Thanks! I will look for that.
  • photokittyphotokitty where I want to be mod
    Moderator Knottie Warrior 5000 Comments 500 Love Its
    I use ammonia and my electric toothbrush...an old head. Works like a charm.
    :kiss: ~xoxo~ :kiss:

  • I use ammonia and my electric toothbrush...an old head. Works like a charm.
    Full strength ammonia can discolor some metals.  I wouldn't recommend this.
    httpiimgurcomTCCjW0wjpg
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