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Banning hard alcohol/liquor at college parties - discuss

2

Re: Banning hard alcohol/liquor at college parties - discuss

  • banana468 said:
    I went to UConn and the school property surrounds some other private businesses.  There were at least 4 bars within walking distance to the main campus area and one packie was in walking distance as well.   That one had ridiculous prices and was known for letting you buy Dubra with a fake.    The other packie down the street was far more reputable and had a decent selection of plenty of things. 

    But because the school's undergrad population was larger than some of the local towns, I can't imagine how they'd police the hard alcohol consumption unless it was simply for a school sanctioned event like a frat party.   You're still going to get jungle juice and plenty of other crappy drinks made with grain or cheap vodka and punch.


    I have never heard this term before.  I'm assuming from the content this is a regional term for a liquor store?  And/or a convenience store that sells liquor?

    Down in NOLA we call that a "corner store", pronounced "cornuh".  I'm sure a lot of places call it that, though perhaps not dropping the last r.  A typically small, mom/pop neighborhood place that sells a variety of items...but people are usually referring to beer.

    A packie is short for package store.   Package stores are liquor stores.   In CT packies can sell beer, wine and hard liquor.   You can also get beer in a grocery store / some convenient stores but nothing harder is available. 

    So when you're of age the "packie run" is the quick way of saying that you're getting booze. 
    charlotte989875short+sassy
  • banana468 said:
    banana468 said:
    I went to UConn and the school property surrounds some other private businesses.  There were at least 4 bars within walking distance to the main campus area and one packie was in walking distance as well.   That one had ridiculous prices and was known for letting you buy Dubra with a fake.    The other packie down the street was far more reputable and had a decent selection of plenty of things. 

    But because the school's undergrad population was larger than some of the local towns, I can't imagine how they'd police the hard alcohol consumption unless it was simply for a school sanctioned event like a frat party.   You're still going to get jungle juice and plenty of other crappy drinks made with grain or cheap vodka and punch.


    I have never heard this term before.  I'm assuming from the content this is a regional term for a liquor store?  And/or a convenience store that sells liquor?

    Down in NOLA we call that a "corner store", pronounced "cornuh".  I'm sure a lot of places call it that, though perhaps not dropping the last r.  A typically small, mom/pop neighborhood place that sells a variety of items...but people are usually referring to beer.

    A packie is short for package store.   Package stores are liquor stores.   In CT packies can sell beer, wine and hard liquor.   You can also get beer in a grocery store / some convenient stores but nothing harder is available. 

    So when you're of age the "packie run" is the quick way of saying that you're getting booze. 

    *************STUCK IN THE FRIZZLE FRAZZLE BOX***************

    I think "packie" might be a New England thing; we make packie runs in MA too.
  • kimmiinthemittenkimmiinthemitten Detroit, MI member
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    banana468 said:
    I went to UConn and the school property surrounds some other private businesses.  There were at least 4 bars within walking distance to the main campus area and one packie was in walking distance as well.   That one had ridiculous prices and was known for letting you buy Dubra with a fake.    The other packie down the street was far more reputable and had a decent selection of plenty of things. 

    But because the school's undergrad population was larger than some of the local towns, I can't imagine how they'd police the hard alcohol consumption unless it was simply for a school sanctioned event like a frat party.   You're still going to get jungle juice and plenty of other crappy drinks made with grain or cheap vodka and punch.


    I have never heard this term before.  I'm assuming from the content this is a regional term for a liquor store?  And/or a convenience store that sells liquor?

    Down in NOLA we call that a "corner store", pronounced "cornuh".  I'm sure a lot of places call it that, though perhaps not dropping the last r.  A typically small, mom/pop neighborhood place that sells a variety of items...but people are usually referring to beer.

    In Michigan we call them party stores, and they sell everything.  I'm so grateful we don't have to go to a different store just for liquor or beer.

    When my sister moved to Florida we asked for a party store and were given directions to a Party City.  I'll have to remember corner store!
    image
    ahoywedding
  • Always fun to learn new regional expressions--I'd never heard the "packie" thing before, either.  Here in MN we just have liquor stores.  The only booze that can be sold anywhere else is 3.2 beer, and who wants that anyway?
    ShesSoCold
  • Always fun to learn new regional expressions--I'd never heard the "packie" thing before, either.  Here in MN we just have liquor stores.  The only booze that can be sold anywhere else is 3.2 beer, and who wants that anyway?
    I had never heard of 3.2 beer until my mom and grandma used the term earlier this year. I was so confused, especially since they were talking about wine coolers which is not beer to me.

    I've also never heard of packie, or corner store (well at least not meaning alcohol). Then again we can't buy alcohol here in Sundays so maybe we are just different
  • kimmiinthemittenkimmiinthemitten Detroit, MI member
    2500 Comments 500 Love Its Third Anniversary 5 Answers
    Wait, what's a 3.2 beer?
    image
  • SaintPaulGalSaintPaulGal member
    500 Love Its 500 Comments First Anniversary First Answer
    edited October 2016
    Wait, what's a 3.2 beer?
    It's beer with a maximum of 3.2% alcohol, which allows it to be sold in grocery or convenience stores in states that otherwise ban liquor sales at "regular" stores.  Because of its low alcohol content it is classified as "non-intoxicating beer" and regulated differently than standard beers.  This also makes it available for purchase on Sundays and outside of the hours that liquor stores are allowed to operate.  There are also 3.2 versions of wine coolers and malt beverages.

    Yeah, Minnesota has weird liquor laws.  We have been trying to legislate them away for ages, but it's actually the liquor lobby opposing the reforms--with mandatory Sunday closure everyone knows to do their shopping in the other 6 days per week and the liquor stores save one day's labor costs.

    It's a sad day when you are going to have a gathering and you realize you have missed the closing time of liquor stores in the city.  Many a poor schmuck has uttered the tragic words "Well, I guess we can have some three two."  Luckily we can just drive to Wisconsin instead. And that would never happen to us because we have an entire closet devoted to cocktail ingredients.
  • lyndausvilyndausvi Western Slope, Colorado mod
    Moderator Knottie Warrior 10000 Comments 500 Love Its
    Wait, what's a 3.2 beer?
    It's beer with a maximum of 3.2% alcohol, which allows it to be sold in grocery or convenience stores in states that otherwise ban liquor sales at "regular" stores.  Because of its low alcohol content it is classified as "non-intoxicating beer" and regulated differently than standard beers.  This also makes it available for purchase on Sundays and outside of the hours that liquor stores are allowed to operate.  There are also 3.2 versions of wine coolers and malt beverages.

    Yeah, Minnesota has weird liquor laws.  We have been trying to legislate them away for ages, but it's actually the liquor lobby opposing the reforms--with mandatory Sunday closure everyone knows to do their shopping in the other 6 days per week and the liquor stores save one day's labor costs.

    It's a sad day when you are going to have a gathering and you realize you have missed the closing time of liquor stores in the city.  Many a poor schmuck has uttered the tragic words "Well, I guess we can have some three two."  Luckily we can just drive to Wisconsin instead. And that would never happen to us because we have an entire closet devoted to cocktail ingredients.
    Ugh, it's been changed since we left, but that was the worst part about living in Indy.    

    Really hard since the 17 years prior I lived in the USVI and NOLA.  Both places you can get alcohol pretty much 24/7.   The first Sunday we tired we were like "WTF"?    It was indeed a sad day.








    What differentiates an average host and a great host is anticipating unexpressed needs and wants of their guests.  Just because the want/need is not expressed, doesn't mean it wouldn't be appreciated. 
    kimmiinthemitten
  • ILoveBeachMusicILoveBeachMusic Indiana member
    2500 Comments Fifth Anniversary 500 Love Its 5 Answers
    lyndausvi said:
    Wait, what's a 3.2 beer?
    It's beer with a maximum of 3.2% alcohol, which allows it to be sold in grocery or convenience stores in states that otherwise ban liquor sales at "regular" stores.  Because of its low alcohol content it is classified as "non-intoxicating beer" and regulated differently than standard beers.  This also makes it available for purchase on Sundays and outside of the hours that liquor stores are allowed to operate.  There are also 3.2 versions of wine coolers and malt beverages.

    Yeah, Minnesota has weird liquor laws.  We have been trying to legislate them away for ages, but it's actually the liquor lobby opposing the reforms--with mandatory Sunday closure everyone knows to do their shopping in the other 6 days per week and the liquor stores save one day's labor costs.

    It's a sad day when you are going to have a gathering and you realize you have missed the closing time of liquor stores in the city.  Many a poor schmuck has uttered the tragic words "Well, I guess we can have some three two."  Luckily we can just drive to Wisconsin instead. And that would never happen to us because we have an entire closet devoted to cocktail ingredients.
    Ugh, it's been changed since we left, but that was the worst part about living in Indy.    

    Really hard since the 17 years prior I lived in the USVI and NOLA.  Both places you can get alcohol pretty much 24/7.   The first Sunday we tired we were like "WTF"?    It was indeed a sad day.


    Nope it hasn't been changed. Still can't buy alcohol on Sundays. Every year it comes up with the legislature but the liquor lobby is too strong.
  • lyndausvi said:
    Wait, what's a 3.2 beer?
    It's beer with a maximum of 3.2% alcohol, which allows it to be sold in grocery or convenience stores in states that otherwise ban liquor sales at "regular" stores.  Because of its low alcohol content it is classified as "non-intoxicating beer" and regulated differently than standard beers.  This also makes it available for purchase on Sundays and outside of the hours that liquor stores are allowed to operate.  There are also 3.2 versions of wine coolers and malt beverages.

    Yeah, Minnesota has weird liquor laws.  We have been trying to legislate them away for ages, but it's actually the liquor lobby opposing the reforms--with mandatory Sunday closure everyone knows to do their shopping in the other 6 days per week and the liquor stores save one day's labor costs.

    It's a sad day when you are going to have a gathering and you realize you have missed the closing time of liquor stores in the city.  Many a poor schmuck has uttered the tragic words "Well, I guess we can have some three two."  Luckily we can just drive to Wisconsin instead. And that would never happen to us because we have an entire closet devoted to cocktail ingredients.
    Ugh, it's been changed since we left, but that was the worst part about living in Indy.    

    Really hard since the 17 years prior I lived in the USVI and NOLA.  Both places you can get alcohol pretty much 24/7.   The first Sunday we tired we were like "WTF"?    It was indeed a sad day.


    Nope it hasn't been changed. Still can't buy alcohol on Sundays. Every year it comes up with the legislature but the liquor lobby is too strong.

    Still not as F'ed up as PA...

    Beer is sold by distributors (usually by the case!), while wine and liquor are in state run stores (and a few select supermarkets are fighting for the right to sell 6-packs and wines I believe)...I know they are making some changes to the laws and allowing convenience stores to start carrying beer here, but my goodness throwing a party requires THREE STOPS in my area...one for sodas/mixers at the food store, one at the state run store (not on Sundays), and one at the beer distributor!

  • lyndausvi said:
    Wait, what's a 3.2 beer?
    It's beer with a maximum of 3.2% alcohol, which allows it to be sold in grocery or convenience stores in states that otherwise ban liquor sales at "regular" stores.  Because of its low alcohol content it is classified as "non-intoxicating beer" and regulated differently than standard beers.  This also makes it available for purchase on Sundays and outside of the hours that liquor stores are allowed to operate.  There are also 3.2 versions of wine coolers and malt beverages.

    Yeah, Minnesota has weird liquor laws.  We have been trying to legislate them away for ages, but it's actually the liquor lobby opposing the reforms--with mandatory Sunday closure everyone knows to do their shopping in the other 6 days per week and the liquor stores save one day's labor costs.

    It's a sad day when you are going to have a gathering and you realize you have missed the closing time of liquor stores in the city.  Many a poor schmuck has uttered the tragic words "Well, I guess we can have some three two."  Luckily we can just drive to Wisconsin instead. And that would never happen to us because we have an entire closet devoted to cocktail ingredients.
    Ugh, it's been changed since we left, but that was the worst part about living in Indy.    

    Really hard since the 17 years prior I lived in the USVI and NOLA.  Both places you can get alcohol pretty much 24/7.   The first Sunday we tired we were like "WTF"?    It was indeed a sad day.


    Nope it hasn't been changed. Still can't buy alcohol on Sundays. Every year it comes up with the legislature but the liquor lobby is too strong.
    I personally don't see it as a big deal, at least for those who live here because you're used to it. visitors in for a game might be annoyed, although even then there are brewery carry out options at some places. Maybe someday it will change.
  • kimmiinthemittenkimmiinthemitten Detroit, MI member
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    What's the benefit for the liquor lobby? A few years ago, you couldn't buy on Christmas and had to wait until noon on Sunday, but now they're both treated as normal days.
    image
    charlotte989875
  • What's the benefit for the liquor lobby? A few years ago, you couldn't buy on Christmas and had to wait until noon on Sunday, but now they're both treated as normal days.
    I think here it is the fact that opening on Sundays means extra costs a special liquor store takes on (staffing, store utilities, etc) whereas a grocery store or CVS type store (which can sell the same alcohol as a liquor store) is already open on those days so they don't have the increased cost to sell on Sunday. 
    kimmiinthemittencharlotte989875lyndausvi
  • kvruns said:
    What's the benefit for the liquor lobby? A few years ago, you couldn't buy on Christmas and had to wait until noon on Sunday, but now they're both treated as normal days.
    I think here it is the fact that opening on Sundays means extra costs a special liquor store takes on (staffing, store utilities, etc) whereas a grocery store or CVS type store (which can sell the same alcohol as a liquor store) is already open on those days so they don't have the increased cost to sell on Sunday. 
    In some parts of the country there is still resistance from social conservatives that do not believe there should be alcohol sold on Sunday, at all. I lived in a county (rural NC) that just become "wet" a few years ago, and the resistance wasn't from liquor stores (they wanted to be open), but from religious groups. Restaurants, liquor stores (which were run by the state) and stores all wanted to be able to sell. 
  • kvruns said:
    What's the benefit for the liquor lobby? A few years ago, you couldn't buy on Christmas and had to wait until noon on Sunday, but now they're both treated as normal days.
    I think here it is the fact that opening on Sundays means extra costs a special liquor store takes on (staffing, store utilities, etc) whereas a grocery store or CVS type store (which can sell the same alcohol as a liquor store) is already open on those days so they don't have the increased cost to sell on Sunday. 
    In some parts of the country there is still resistance from social conservatives that do not believe there should be alcohol sold on Sunday, at all. I lived in a county (rural NC) that just become "wet" a few years ago, and the resistance wasn't from liquor stores (they wanted to be open), but from religious groups. Restaurants, liquor stores (which were run by the state) and stores all wanted to be able to sell. 
    We definitely have the social conservative side here too, although it does not seem to be the driving force in the lack of Sunday sales anymore, it really is the liquor store lobby (or at least from what I've gathered without ever looking too far into this issue)
  • kvruns said:
    What's the benefit for the liquor lobby? A few years ago, you couldn't buy on Christmas and had to wait until noon on Sunday, but now they're both treated as normal days.
    I think here it is the fact that opening on Sundays means extra costs a special liquor store takes on (staffing, store utilities, etc) whereas a grocery store or CVS type store (which can sell the same alcohol as a liquor store) is already open on those days so they don't have the increased cost to sell on Sunday. 
    YOU CAN BUY ALCOHOL AT CVS??? 
    STARMOON44kimmiinthemittenei34
  • kvruns said:
    What's the benefit for the liquor lobby? A few years ago, you couldn't buy on Christmas and had to wait until noon on Sunday, but now they're both treated as normal days.
    I think here it is the fact that opening on Sundays means extra costs a special liquor store takes on (staffing, store utilities, etc) whereas a grocery store or CVS type store (which can sell the same alcohol as a liquor store) is already open on those days so they don't have the increased cost to sell on Sunday. 
    YOU CAN BUY ALCOHOL AT CVS??? 
    that's where we always bought it in college, it was cheaper than liquor stores and just as convenient. It was a limited selection but it had what we needed
  • kvruns said:
    What's the benefit for the liquor lobby? A few years ago, you couldn't buy on Christmas and had to wait until noon on Sunday, but now they're both treated as normal days.
    I think here it is the fact that opening on Sundays means extra costs a special liquor store takes on (staffing, store utilities, etc) whereas a grocery store or CVS type store (which can sell the same alcohol as a liquor store) is already open on those days so they don't have the increased cost to sell on Sunday. 
    YOU CAN BUY ALCOHOL AT CVS??? 

    Lol, I'm not sure if CVS sells alcohol where I live (I don't usually go there), but they could if they wanted.  Rite Aid sells booze beer, wine, and (I think) even hard liquors.
    Wedding Countdown Ticker
  • banana468 said:
    I went to UConn and the school property surrounds some other private businesses.  There were at least 4 bars within walking distance to the main campus area and one packie was in walking distance as well.   That one had ridiculous prices and was known for letting you buy Dubra with a fake.    The other packie down the street was far more reputable and had a decent selection of plenty of things. 

    But because the school's undergrad population was larger than some of the local towns, I can't imagine how they'd police the hard alcohol consumption unless it was simply for a school sanctioned event like a frat party.   You're still going to get jungle juice and plenty of other crappy drinks made with grain or cheap vodka and punch.


    I have never heard this term before.  I'm assuming from the content this is a regional term for a liquor store?  And/or a convenience store that sells liquor?

    Down in NOLA we call that a "corner store", pronounced "cornuh".  I'm sure a lot of places call it that, though perhaps not dropping the last r.  A typically small, mom/pop neighborhood place that sells a variety of items...but people are usually referring to beer.

    In Michigan we call them party stores, and they sell everything.  I'm so grateful we don't have to go to a different store just for liquor or beer.

    When my sister moved to Florida we asked for a party store and were given directions to a Party City.  I'll have to remember corner store!


    I would have thought that was what you meant also, lol.  If I remember correctly, beer/wine can be sold in grocery stores in FL.  But liquor definitely cannot.  It can only be sold at official liquor stores; however, unlike some states, they aren't "state" stores...where you need a map, a compass, a bloodhound, and a sixth sense to find one.  They are individually owned and run, so there are tons of them and they are all over the place.

    When I was briefly living in Miami, there was a big old normal Winn Dixie (grocery store) in a shopping center.  Then a "mini me" Winn Dixie liquor store, the size of a normal strip mall store, right next to it.  Exact same looking architecture/signage and everything.

    Wedding Countdown Ticker
  • kvruns said:
    What's the benefit for the liquor lobby? A few years ago, you couldn't buy on Christmas and had to wait until noon on Sunday, but now they're both treated as normal days.
    I think here it is the fact that opening on Sundays means extra costs a special liquor store takes on (staffing, store utilities, etc) whereas a grocery store or CVS type store (which can sell the same alcohol as a liquor store) is already open on those days so they don't have the increased cost to sell on Sunday. 
    YOU CAN BUY ALCOHOL AT CVS??? 

    Lol, I'm not sure if CVS sells alcohol where I live (I don't usually go there), but they could if they wanted.  Rite Aid sells booze beer, wine, and (I think) even hard liquors.
    Sometimes another state is like a whole different world!  As I mentioned, I live pretty close to the Wisconsin border, where they have much looser liquor laws. It's still just straight up bizarre for me to walk into a Target in WI and see an endcap display with tequila!  Like, what is this doing here?  How did the liquor escape from the liquor store?  Do they know it has infiltrated the Target?
    short+sassykimmiinthemitten
  • cupcait927cupcait927 Western NY wine country member
    Seventh Anniversary 2500 Comments 500 Love Its First Answer
    I'm just jealous of everyone that can buy wine at the grocery store. NY state still hasn't jumped on that bandwagon. It was glorious when H and I were in NC a few weeks ago and I was able to buy a new bathing suit and a bottle of wine at Target.
  • I'm just jealous of everyone that can buy wine at the grocery store. NY state still hasn't jumped on that bandwagon. It was glorious when H and I were in NC a few weeks ago and I was able to buy a new bathing suit and a bottle of wine at Target.
    We are just getting this in Ontario in the past year. 

    I remember when you couldn't buy alcohol (or anything) on a Sunday. On any Stat holidays all the stores are closed so you can't buy alcohol. Liquor stores on Christmas and New Year's Eve are CRAZY!


  • lyndausvilyndausvi Western Slope, Colorado mod
    Moderator Knottie Warrior 10000 Comments 500 Love Its
    edited October 2016

    Let me blow everyone's mind for a moment.

    Here in NOLA, liquor samples are passed out in grocery stores and Sam's Clubs.  I actually did that for a great paying gig job a few years ago leading up to the Christmas season.

    I did have to take a 4-hour class to get a BAR card.  Essentially a state license all servers/bartenders need to serve alcohol.  And I did have to ID anyone who looked under 40 before I could give them their free sample.  But...yeah.  Pretty crazy.

    It was especially fun to work the grocery store in the Downtown area, which is also the closest one to the Quarter.  Lots of OOT people with looks of stunned shock.

    My LA one just expired a few months ago.  I don't live there anymore, but I still carried that thing around.   Ha.


    In the USVI you were able to get a rum punch sample as you got off the plane and the rush hour ferries when you got off in St John.  Kmart in the VI had the cheapest liquor prices.  Even the cruise ship passengers would walk over to Kmart to get liquor.



    We went from the VI to NOLA.  So it wasn't much of a change. You can buy all alcohol at any store.  In the VI there was even one 24-hour gas station that after like 2am or so you could buy anything as long as it fit in the security drawer thingy since you couldn't actually go into the store.   BTW  - a bottle of champagne fits :p    

    Indy? Now that was a shock.     Beer/wine at grocery stores (except on sundays).   Liquor at a package store closed on Sundays. Now you can get growlers filled at the brewery on Sundays.  Those lines were long between 5:30 and 6pm (when they had to close).       Way too much thinking on where/when to get certain alcohols.  I'm a one-stop shopper.  Took a few months to get use to it.  Then after that we just stocked up more than usual to be safe.






    What differentiates an average host and a great host is anticipating unexpressed needs and wants of their guests.  Just because the want/need is not expressed, doesn't mean it wouldn't be appreciated. 
    short+sassy
  • Yeah, in CT Sunday sales started in the last 10 years.   Blue laws only recently allowed the sale until 9 PM and there are no alcohol sales on holidays.

    The mad dash to get your stash before 8 was a real issue.   I remember spending the weekend with a friend in NYC saying, "Don't we need to run to get wine before the store closes???" and she just giggled. 
  • Here most liquor stores are independently owned as opposed to state run, but some municipalities have regulations that only allow for city-run shops.

    In other booze news, my city council just voted yesterday to extend sales to 10 PM Monday-Friday (it was already 10 on Friday and Saturday, closed on Sunday)!  Woo!  All the surrounding cities changed closing time to 10 over a decade ago when the state law changed, but somehow it never got adjusted in my city.  It wasn't a big deal to pop over to Minneapolis if it was after 8 on a week night, since the border is like a mile from our house, but now we will be able to go to the store just a few blocks up the street.
  • kimmiinthemittenkimmiinthemitten Detroit, MI member
    2500 Comments 500 Love Its Third Anniversary 5 Answers
    Here most liquor stores are independently owned as opposed to state run, but some municipalities have regulations that only allow for city-run shops.

    In other booze news, my city council just voted yesterday to extend sales to 10 PM Monday-Friday (it was already 10 on Friday and Saturday, closed on Sunday)!  Woo!  All the surrounding cities changed closing time to 10 over a decade ago when the state law changed, but somehow it never got adjusted in my city.  It wasn't a big deal to pop over to Minneapolis if it was after 8 on a week night, since the border is like a mile from our house, but now we will be able to go to the store just a few blocks up the street.
    10pm?  Where do you live; 1950?  Hell, half the time I forget to buy wine until I'm sitting on the sofa.
    image
    charlotte989875STARMOON44lyndausvi
  • Here most liquor stores are independently owned as opposed to state run, but some municipalities have regulations that only allow for city-run shops.

    In other booze news, my city council just voted yesterday to extend sales to 10 PM Monday-Friday (it was already 10 on Friday and Saturday, closed on Sunday)!  Woo!  All the surrounding cities changed closing time to 10 over a decade ago when the state law changed, but somehow it never got adjusted in my city.  It wasn't a big deal to pop over to Minneapolis if it was after 8 on a week night, since the border is like a mile from our house, but now we will be able to go to the store just a few blocks up the street.
    10pm?  Where do you live; 1950?  Hell, half the time I forget to buy wine until I'm sitting on the sofa.
    I can't get pizza after 9 in my town!!

    Luckily I do live a half hour from the country's best - but that's a new tangent.   
  • kimmiinthemittenkimmiinthemitten Detroit, MI member
    2500 Comments 500 Love Its Third Anniversary 5 Answers
    banana468 said:
    Here most liquor stores are independently owned as opposed to state run, but some municipalities have regulations that only allow for city-run shops.

    In other booze news, my city council just voted yesterday to extend sales to 10 PM Monday-Friday (it was already 10 on Friday and Saturday, closed on Sunday)!  Woo!  All the surrounding cities changed closing time to 10 over a decade ago when the state law changed, but somehow it never got adjusted in my city.  It wasn't a big deal to pop over to Minneapolis if it was after 8 on a week night, since the border is like a mile from our house, but now we will be able to go to the store just a few blocks up the street.
    10pm?  Where do you live; 1950?  Hell, half the time I forget to buy wine until I'm sitting on the sofa.
    I can't get pizza after 9 in my town!!

    Luckily I do live a half hour from the country's best - but that's a new tangent.   
    Oh man!  I'm so glad I'm a city girl.
    image
  • cupcait927cupcait927 Western NY wine country member
    Seventh Anniversary 2500 Comments 500 Love Its First Answer
    edited October 2016
    Here most liquor stores are independently owned as opposed to state run, but some municipalities have regulations that only allow for city-run shops.

    In other booze news, my city council just voted yesterday to extend sales to 10 PM Monday-Friday (it was already 10 on Friday and Saturday, closed on Sunday)!  Woo!  All the surrounding cities changed closing time to 10 over a decade ago when the state law changed, but somehow it never got adjusted in my city.  It wasn't a big deal to pop over to Minneapolis if it was after 8 on a week night, since the border is like a mile from our house, but now we will be able to go to the store just a few blocks up the street.
    10pm?  Where do you live; 1950?  Hell, half the time I forget to buy wine until I'm sitting on the sofa.


    We can't buy wine or liquor after 9 pm where I live, 6 pm on Sundays. There is one rogue liquor store a couple towns over that stays open until 10 on Friday & Saturdays but that's it. Beer can be bought in stores starting at 8 am until 2 am, any day of the week. Our governor did just pass a new law that, among other things, allows restaurants and bars to now sell alcohol starting at 10 am instead of noon on Sundays because brunch.
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