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Invites and Paper

Divorced parents with a twist- invitation wording

edited November 2017 in Invites and Paper
So my parents are both equally paying for the wedding but are also divorced.  My mom is remarried but she never legally changed her last name (professional reasons) so I can't write Mrs. mom's name and then Mr. dad's name because it will look like they are still married, even if on separate lines.  Is there a way to write the invitation without writing their names? (I know about the "Together with their families" option but my FH's parents are not involved with the wedding at all and the "their families" part makes it sound like they are).

I was hoping to say something like "the parents of...." but I don't know how to write the rest. 

Thanks!   

Re: Divorced parents with a twist- invitation wording

  • Jen4948Jen4948 Houston member
    10000 Comments Sixth Anniversary 500 Love Its 25 Answers
    If both your parents, despite their divorce, are hosting, you can use

    Ms. Bride's Mother
    Mr. Bride's Father
    request the honor of your presence (for a religious ceremony)/
    request the pleasure of your company (for all other ceremonies)
    at the marriage of their daughter
    Itsaperfectfitz
    and
    Groom
    at time
    Day, Date
    Year
    Venue Address
    City, State/Country


    short+sassySP29
  • CMGragainCMGragain member
    10000 Comments 500 Love Its Fourth Anniversary 25 Answers
    edited November 2017
    Married people are always listed on the same line.  Divorced people are listed on separate lines.  There will be no confusion.  Jen has the right wording.  Here is another example.

    Ms. Jane Ann Smith
    Mr. John James Smith
    request the pleasure of your company
    at the marriage of their daughter
    Ann Marie
    to
    Mr. George Mark Jones
    Saturday, the date of June
    two thousand eighteen
    at half after six o'clock
    Venue Name
    Address
    Anytown, Iowa
    httpiimgurcomTCCjW0wjpg
    short+sassySP29
  • Thank you both for your replys! I guess I was looking at it as my mom would be listed as a Mrs. and not Ms. since she is remarried.  I didn't think about just leaving it as Ms. and keeping them on separate lines with the same last name.

    Thanks again!
  • Assuming that if your mom is helping with the wedding, your step-dad probably is too (unless their finances are completely separate). You can include his name after your mom's:
     
    Ms. Jane Ann Smith and Mr. James Edward Doe
    Mr. John James Smith
    .
    .
    .

    This would further clear up any misconception that your parents are still married.
    *********************************************************************************

    image
    InLoveInQueensSP29charlotte989875
  • CMGragainCMGragain member
    10000 Comments 500 Love Its Fourth Anniversary 25 Answers
    edited November 2017
    Thank you both for your replys! I guess I was looking at it as my mom would be listed as a Mrs. and not Ms. since she is remarried.  I didn't think about just leaving it as Ms. and keeping them on separate lines with the same last name.

    Thanks again!
    Your Mom should be listed the way she prefers.  "Mrs. Jane Ann Smith" is perfectly acceptable as long as it is on a separate line from your father's name.  There is no reason to list your stepfather's name unless he is also hosting.
    "Ms." simply means female.  It does not affect a woman's marital status at all.
    httpiimgurcomTCCjW0wjpg
  • CMGragain said:
    Thank you both for your replys! I guess I was looking at it as my mom would be listed as a Mrs. and not Ms. since she is remarried.  I didn't think about just leaving it as Ms. and keeping them on separate lines with the same last name.

    Thanks again!
    Your Mom should be listed the way she prefers.  "Mrs. Jane Ann Smith" is perfectly acceptable as long as it is on a separate line from your father's name.  There is no reason to list your stepfather's name unless he is also hosting.
    "Ms." simply means female.  It does not affect a woman's marital status at all.
    I think OP may have been thinking of "Miss." since that does convey marital status. Ms. does not.
    image
  • Thank you all for your responses! I feel much better about how to proceed with the wording. :smile:
    missJeanLouiselovesclimbing
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