Wedding Woes

She is not choosing to leave, so no public send off necessary

Prudence

I am the manager of a great employee who has been in the same position for more than a decade. She has chosen not to be vaccinated. We haven’t discussed vaccination in depth, but she mentioned that she would leave if required to vaccinate. I reinforced that she has been a great employee and I would hate to see her leave, but I respect her decisions.

Last week, our employer sent out a letter requiring full vaccination soon. I will ask her to reconsider, but expect to plan for a successor. Technically, she’ll be let go for no longer meeting the requirements of the job. However, it feels like she is making the choice to leave. Our organization would normally celebrate the accomplishments of people who choose to leave. This feels like something in between. What is an appropriate send off for those sent off?

— Not Dissing the Dismissed

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Re: She is not choosing to leave, so no public send off necessary

  • It would depend on what the company normally does as to what I would think was appropriate. If it is just a card signed and a giant cookie, go ahead and do it. If it is a catered dinner with a slide show, maybe just do a signed card and a big cookie instead.
  • climbingsingleclimbingsingle NYC 'burbs member
    Eighth Anniversary 10000 Comments 500 Love Its 5 Answers
    edited October 21
    No, you don't get a send off for leaving your job because you refuse to get the vaccine. 

    ETA: An OOO saying so-and-so is no longer with the company is enough, IMO. Or a company wide email saying "So and so is no longer employed here and we wish them the best. Blah blah"
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  • She's not leaving for another opportunity; she's being let go because she refuses to adhere to a company policy that is for everyone's health and safety. At the most, send an email thanking her for her work with the company and wishing her well. There shouldn't be a cake or a party or anything like that.
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  • Imagine the employee gets anaphylactic response when they get any vaccine and have a lifelong history as such (so either will experience a reaction that could mean Ambulance/ER time plus months of follow-up medical care and cost or immediate unpleasant death just to keep their job)...  In the past and upheld by SCOTUS vaccine mandates required allowances for medical exemption and conscientious objection.  This has potential for a lawsuit to the company..  

    They are firing her, so same as what the company would do in any other circumstance when they're firing someone...
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  • climbingsingleclimbingsingle NYC 'burbs member
    Eighth Anniversary 10000 Comments 500 Love Its 5 Answers
    MesmrEwe said:
    Imagine the employee gets anaphylactic response when they get any vaccine and have a lifelong history as such (so either will experience a reaction that could mean Ambulance/ER time plus months of follow-up medical care and cost or immediate unpleasant death just to keep their job)...  In the past and upheld by SCOTUS vaccine mandates required allowances for medical exemption and conscientious objection.  This has potential for a lawsuit to the company..  

    They are firing her, so same as what the company would do in any other circumstance when they're firing someone...
    Are you serious with this?
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  • MesmrEwe said:
    Imagine the employee gets anaphylactic response when they get any vaccine and have a lifelong history as such (so either will experience a reaction that could mean Ambulance/ER time plus months of follow-up medical care and cost or immediate unpleasant death just to keep their job)...  In the past and upheld by SCOTUS vaccine mandates required allowances for medical exemption and conscientious objection.  This has potential for a lawsuit to the company..  

    They are firing her, so same as what the company would do in any other circumstance when they're firing someone...




    i don’t need to “imagine” this at all because that is still the law. If she had a legitimate medical reason she could not get the vaccine, or a religious objection that could be accommodated without risking others, she wouldn’t be getting fired. 

    Your post is ignorant. 
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  • @MesmrEwe, I was reading an article this morning from the Sun Sentinel (FL).  I was mainly reading it to learn more about booster shots and timing, but it had a large Q & A section all about COVID and vaccines.  A reader asked if they can be fired from their job for refusing to take the vaccine.

    The response from both an employment lawyer and CEO of a human resources company was that, yes, companies can legally do that.  With caveats that it is as long as the employee does not have a medical or religious exemptions and that the "firing without a vaccine" policy is uniformly applied.  So people with medical or religious exemptions are already protected, unless it's a special circumstance.

    A company also cannot say, "We're going to fire these employees because they haven't been vaccinated.  But Jane has a critical role, so we aren't going to fire her even though she also isn't vaccinated."

    Here is the exact excerpt:

    Q. “Can my job lay me off if I do not have the COVID shot or refuse to take it?” — Jason Cintron

    A. Yes, you may lose your job if you decline a COVID-19 vaccine. The Sun-Sentinel asked several workplace experts this question and the consensus was that as long as the employer treats everyone equally, a mandate is allowed. Here’s what two of the experts said:

    Donna Ballman, Fort Lauderdale employment lawyer: “Yes, employees can be terminated for refusing to vaccinate, unless they fall within a legal exception. If they do fall within an exception, then the issue will be whether there is a hardship on the employer. If the employer can prove there is a hardship, they may still be able to terminate, even with an exception.”

    Jay Starkman, founder and CEO of the Miami-based human resources firm Engage PEO: “If it is not a refusal where [the employees] are taking steps to show a religious belief or a bona fide medical reason, then the answer is yes, as long as the policy is uniformly enforced. You can’t say these three employees are going to be fired, but this fourth one is essential to the business — we’re going to keep them on. You can’t do that.”

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