Wedding Woes
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Link in post, and poll

http://community.thenest.com/cs/ks/forums/25461751/ShowThread.aspx#25461751 What do you think of this? Do you think this is the fault of the military and its veteran care, or a logical consequence of going off to war, or some combination? Do you think the aftereffects are reflective of the person's character and who they were beforehand, or is it more of a crapshoot? What would you do if you were in this situation as the wife?
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Re: Link in post, and poll

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    PMeg819PMeg819 member
    First Anniversary First Comment 5 Love Its First Answer
    edited December 2011
    Unfortunately, it's a consequence of poor care, the outcome of goign to war, and the military's ineffectiveness in dealing and recognizing these issues. I honestly believe it's a crap shoot. So much of mental illness is genetic, but so much of it is environment. Many men and women are raised in loving homes, marry wonderful people, and are shipped off to other countries and placed in situations they would never encounter. It's easy to see how that can trigger problems for someone, especially when they aren't given the tools to effectively deal with it all.
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    ReturnOfKuusReturnOfKuus member
    First Anniversary 5 Love Its First Comment Name Dropper
    edited December 2011
    I just wonder if there ARE tools to effectively deal with an ongoing situation that stressful and out of the norm.
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    PMeg819PMeg819 member
    First Anniversary First Comment 5 Love Its First Answer
    edited December 2011
    To a certain extent, yes. At the end of the day...who are these people talking to? Their fellow soldiers. Is it wildly idealistic to think they'd have a team of counselors and psychologists on hand at camps to discuss ongoing issues...yes, but it could make a world of difference. Now, my experience is limited through second hand experiences from others but I've never known anyone who went through any sort of training that included some sort of discussion about your mental health. My dad flew search and rescue missions. I know from him that they talk about what to do when you find someone, get them on board, assess injury etc, but they never talk about how you feel when it's all over.
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    edited December 2011
    Having worked with these people and studied them, I can tell you it is an interaction. Kuus, if you really want to know, FBM me and I'll hook you up with some names and you can read the research.
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    fishgirl77fishgirl77 member
    First Comment
    edited December 2011
    H was in the first Gulf War and has PTSD, as does his BFF who also served in that war.The best thing for anyone who has PTSD is to be treated early.  H was not and what treatment he did receive from the VA was woefully inadequate.  He was subjected to therapeutic techniques that caused him to become more agitated and was repeated prescribed many drugs, all of which made him feel terrible.  Once he was outside the VA system, he got better treatment and folks that actually listened to what worked and what didn't.I don't know if it's a crapshoot, because both H and his BFF had pretty rough home situations prior to enlisting.  I have struggled with H through our relationship, but he has also participated in looking for proper care.  If he hadn't, I don't know what would have happened.
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    edited December 2011
    echo fish re: VA.
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