July 2012 Weddings
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*mekiakoo*

I hope you'll excuse my ignorance, but I'm absolutely curious and you and your FI... since you both are deaf, how do you make phone calls?  And does it make driving more difficult?

I've never known anyone who was deaf, so I am clueless on these things.

I hope I don't offend you with my nosey questions.  :)
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Re: *mekiakoo*

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    I was wondering the same thing when she was talking about the cable in her other post!!!

    Also through the whole closing process how did you and FI communicate with everyone?  Do you use a translator? 

    And you teach too right?  Do you teach deaf kids? 
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    Not offended at all :) Feel free to ask me questions!!

    We usually communicate with other people via text message but if it's something that I need to make a call for like DirecTV or a store, we have a device called Video Phone which is pretty much the same as a webcam or skype except it is through a TV. We make a phone call by using a remote and then an interpreter will pop up and be able to translate whatever I sign to the speaker on the other side. Kind of like a 3 way thing- the interpreter will listen to the speaker then sign it to me on the screen.

    We have that feature on our phones too, but obviously it requires a good connection to be able to have it work.

    Driving is not difficult at all. We use our eyes a lot, usually it seems like deaf people can see things more (or better) compared to hearing people. We rely on our eyes way more. We drive just fine- we just need to be sure to always check our surroundings, our rearview mirror. I've never had a problem noticing that a cop wants to pull me over :)

    We usually have an interpreter for meetings like the closing but it can be a difficult process especially if they don't want to pay for an interpreter. Under the ADA law, companies with more than 10 employees are required to provide an interpreter (under 10 employees may be a finacial constrict for them or something). But during the closing, the bank did not want to pay for one and wanted to roll over the cost of an interpreter into our closing!!! So we had FI's dad come and sign everything for us. So grateful for him! :)

    I actually teach hearing high school students. I can't speak nor hear at all, but I teach ASL so it works out just fine. I use a lot of power point presentations and I have a hearing student intern (who has taken classes under me) too. It's fun watching us not being able to communicate at the start of the class to being able to communicate pretty well at the end of the semester. Sometimes it scares me, but haven't had a problem with communicating- if something is not understood through signing, we can always write things down or type on the computer or something. They're high school students so they're able to read (whew!!).
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    This is so fascinating.

    I have a very good friend who majored in ASL in college and I was always amazed by how complicated it is! 

    I think it's very cool that you teach hearing students, though. I would have assumed (incorrectly) that you taught at a deaf school. (My friend now teaches deaf children.)
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    BrightFireflyBrightFirefly member
    First Comment
    edited March 2012
    In Response to <a href="http://forums.theknot.com/Sites/theknot/Pages/Main.aspx/wedding-club-boards_july-2012-weddings_mekiakoo-1?plckFindPostKey=Cat:Wedding Club BoardsForum:066005ef-215f-48b1-8655-328b41e07c52Discussion:e3fae5f4-c5d1-418a-a95e-f7e320b29b87Post:5b88de16-a0ba-4484-8149-91f85e64efb1">Re: *mekiakoo*</a>:
    [QUOTE]We usually have an interpreter for meetings like the closing but it can be a difficult process especially if they don't want to pay for an interpreter. Under the ADA law, companies with more than 10 employees are required to provide an interpreter (under 10 employees may be a finacial constrict for them or something). But during the closing, the bank did not want to pay for one and wanted to roll over the cost of an interpreter into our closing!!! So we had FI's dad come and sign everything for us. Posted by mekiakoo[/QUOTE]


    Ugggh. I worked somewhere and they didn't want to hire interpreters for deaf patients. It was awful. They would come up with any excuse possible to not be able to do it - until they were threatened with a lawsuit. 

    They'd try to get away with just typing back and forth on a computer. -_-
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    This is so fascinating. THanks for the explanation! I also was (incorrectly) assuming that you taught at a deaf school - I am even more impressed now that I know what you really do! 
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    Haha thanks ladies!

    I've never pictured myself teaching hearing students, much less being a teacher. But guess that's where I ended up! I was so nervous at the start, teaching a classroom full of students who don't communicate in the same language as me.

    I forgot to mention that I also teach deaf students part time. I teach a 17 & 10 year old math in the mornings and I teach ASL during the rest of the day.

    Just heard from the principal that the program is growing and I have over 200 students signed up for ASL classes next year and I am even more nervous! This will mean I will not have time to work with my deaf students and I am a bit sad about that :(


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    Wow that is really fascinating.  I feel like us who can hear and speak take it for granted.  I am sure some everyday things are a lot more difficult for you to do. 
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    In Response to <a href="http://forums.theknot.com/Sites/theknot/Pages/Main.aspx/wedding-club-boards_july-2012-weddings_mekiakoo-1?plckFindPostKey=Cat:Wedding Club BoardsForum:066005ef-215f-48b1-8655-328b41e07c52Discussion:e3fae5f4-c5d1-418a-a95e-f7e320b29b87Post:886e8d3a-9b73-4f7e-b8b7-7fedc06f0eb1">Re: *mekiakoo*</a>:
    [QUOTE]Wow that is really fascinating.  I feel like us who can hear and speak take it for granted.  I am sure some everyday things are a lot more difficult for you to do. 
    Posted by LADY324[/QUOTE]

    Yes, but at the same time I don't know what I am missing, you know what I mean?? Every semester I have my students do an experience paper. They need to see what it is like being deaf for at least 30 minutes (such as watching TV without sound and with captions on, going out to a restaurant and use different methods of communicating other than speaking, etc) and then reflect on that. Often my students mention that they had no idea how lucky they were able to hear and how they shouldn't take things like that for granted.

    I think it's mostly communication barrier that's the most frustrating for me. Otherwise I don't think I've got it bad :)
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    Katie, thanks so much for sharing! 

    I'm always amazed by how far our technology has come to help with communicating between all different kinds of people... langauges, capabilities, etc etc.

    I think the experience exercise you do you with your students is a perfect way to give perspective on an age group that is often very self-centered and naive (not to sound negative, but they are what they are haha).  I love it!
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