Students
Options

Grad school

The deadline for the application for the Spring is in November. When should I start getting everything together to apply??

Re: Grad school

  • Options
    now?  if you have time, why not get things together - even if you add to your resume, it will be started ... why not work on a generic personal statement?  make sure you have any immunizations you need (medical school/nursing/maybe some others?)
  • Options
    I only need a statement of purpose (which is the hardest thing to do) and an application. I think the statement of purpose is hard for me. (im a history major)
  • Options
    I threw it all together at the last minute because I decided to stop stalling and just take the plunge and apply. I think I got it all together (including rec's) in about a week and a half to two weeks. So depending on your program, you might have plenty of time.
    imageImage and video hosting by TinyPicVacation
  • Options
    Haha I think with my current GPA I won't need letter of rec's but I know the dean of my department so I dunno if he has anythign to do with the process. But I think I'll do it tonight.
  • Options
    I would ask for letters, just in case you decide at the last minute to apply to a different program that requires them.  It takes a while for professors to get them to you, and it will be good to have them.  I've honestly never heard of any graduate/professional program that didn't require letters of reccomendation, and even if you truly don't need them it's nice to have on file. 

    If you have to take the general GRE, you may consider taking it early, so that you have time to take it again and maybe even take a course if you're not happy with your score.  Some programs require subject GREs, so if it's common for history programs you might want to take that, as well (again, in case you decide to apply to another program, you don't want to be limited by not having these things).
    Image and video hosting by TinyPic
    Lilypie First Birthday tickers
  • Options
    I would start now. My program's deadline is in June and I started in like August.  I'm still freaking revising my letter of intent.  It's ridic.
    I french with my man
    Daisypath Anniversary tickers
  • Options
    My school is kinda crappy hahahaha. But I don't need the GRE. Only a statement of purpose and an application. Im nervous
  • Options
    Is it too late to apply to start for fall semester? Or are you finishing up undergrad?
    imageImage and video hosting by TinyPicVacation
  • Options
    Im still finishing undergrad, and it would be too late anyway.
  • Options
    If you decide you need recs (and hey, apply to more than one school!) then ask for them at least a month in advance of the deadline. To me the idea of not needing even the general GRE to apply for a grad program is really bizarre....so you might want to check about that....and if you decide to apply somewhere (i.e. everywhere I've heard of) that requires it check out their schedule and plan around that.
  • Options
    and needed for your application or not - you should probably have s skeleton resume on file...
  • Options
    In Response to <a href="http://forums.theknot.com/Sites/theknot/Pages/Main.aspx/special-topic-wedding-boards_students_grad-school?plckFindPostKey=Cat:Special%20Topic%20Wedding%20BoardsForum:684Discussion:2b5d8e09-5c2b-4e4c-bbba-9e49e73ee48ePost:be3000bf-db63-4a5f-a29a-c745e1551c8c">Re: Grad school</a>:
    [QUOTE]My school is kinda crappy hahahaha. But I don't need the GRE. Only a statement of purpose and an application. Im nervous
    Posted by stacie+luciano[/QUOTE]

    I think I made it pretty clear that it's a good idea to do these things in case you decide to apply to another program in addition to the one you're considering.  Most people will tell you it's a good idea to apply to more than one school, and as another poster said, it's likely that another program will at least require the general GRE.

    Not to be rude, but if your school is so 'crappy', as you put it, why are you only applying there?  Don't you think it would be worthwhile to try to go to a better school?  This is your future, not just a casual choice like which movie to see or what to have for lunch.
    Image and video hosting by TinyPic
    Lilypie First Birthday tickers
  • Options
    In Response to <a href="http://forums.theknot.com/Sites/theknot/Pages/Main.aspx/special-topic-wedding-boards_students_grad-school?plckFindPostKey=Cat:Special Topic Wedding BoardsForum:684Discussion:2b5d8e09-5c2b-4e4c-bbba-9e49e73ee48ePost:3cee303e-527b-4f54-baf6-5ce128012316">Re: Grad school</a>:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Grad school : I think I made it pretty clear that it's a good idea to do these things in case you decide to apply to another program in addition to the one you're considering.  Most people will tell you it's a good idea to apply to more than one school, and as another poster said, it's likely that another program will at least require the general GRE. Not to be rude, but if your school is so 'crappy', as you put it, why are you only applying there?  Don't you think it would be worthwhile to try to go to a better school?  This is your future, not just a casual choice like which movie to see or what to have for lunch.
    Posted by LauraT25[/QUOTE]

    It might be worth it but I can't relocate. I already drive an hour one way to get to school. And its a crappy school. I know a lot of the professors and it where I'm going to finish. Plus, its the least expensive school.

    And I looked all over the school and departments website. I only need the LOI and application.

    As for another program, you need at least 18 hours (12 of them have to be upper division) and I do not have that, so its going to be history.
  • Options
    Why can't you relocate?  This may sound harsh but if I seriously could NOT relocate to a different school for some reason, and my only option was a 'crappy' school, I wouldn't go to grad school.  You will be spending money and a lot of time and energy, and it's really not worth it if you're going to a school that you have no confidence in.  You may want to consider a different career option.

    Grad school sucks.  it is hard, and miserable, and oftentimes it feels like it's the worst choice you ever made.  If you're going for history, you'll also wind up having to pay money for it.  The only reason to persevere is knowing that it's WORTH getting a degree because it will advance you in your field, and it sounds like this school might not be able to do that for you.  Honestly, there are online master's and even PhD programs now, maybe they'd be worth checking into, and you could actually get a job while you're doing that.

    If you can't relocate for graduate school, does that mean you can't relocate for a job, either?  Because I would imagine your options in the job department, graduate degree or not, are quite limited from the way you describe your location.  I'm really sorry if this is harsh, but I'm having a hard time understanding your thought process.
    Image and video hosting by TinyPic
    Lilypie First Birthday tickers
  • Options
    Also, when I said 'another program', I meant at a different school.  Sorry about the confusion.

    I'm curious - this is the school you're attending for your undergrad?  So is this a combined B.S./M.S. program (or something similar)?  If so, that's an entirely different animal and I think it's fine - my school had one for chemistry and it only required a certain GPA and a recommendation from faculty (not a letter, someone just had to sort of nominate you).  For us, it just meant getting the two degrees in a five-year combined program rather than six years for two separate programs.
    Image and video hosting by TinyPic
    Lilypie First Birthday tickers
  • Options
    what are your career plans?  i have to second laura, but it sounds like your job prospects might be very limited - and i'm not sure what a masters in history gets you that a bacholers doesn't and in this tight ecomony, people probably aren't going to be willing to shell out the extra cash to pay you and you might actually be passed up for employment.
  • Options
    Most people I know with degrees in history end up teaching.  And a lot of high schools will let you teach provisionally (without a license as long as you're working towards one).  If you really want a masters, I'm going to second Laura and say that it might be worth it to look into an online program.  Also, if you don't plan on getting a PhD, where you get your masters is going to count more than where you got your undergrad.  That being said, it would be worth it to look at a better university.

    Relocating to a better university, which would probably also be in a bigger city, might also give you access to more jobs, where you could work and go to school.  Just because you started at one school and got your BA there doesn't mean that you have to get your MA there.  Maybe it's just in Biology, I've been encouraged to pursue my MS and PhD at different schools so that once I'm ready to start looking at jobs, I'll have a more diverse CV, which schools like to see.
    I french with my man
    Daisypath Anniversary tickers
  • Options
    I would start now if you can. 
    imageDaisypath Anniversary tickers
  • Options
    See, Texas schools are way different. Online grad school is unheard of and if there are classes, its expensive. I have a good job now and am not willing to leave it and FI owes too much on the house to sell it so thats not going to happen. And Im sure as fuuck not going to live out of state or city and leave him here when we're a married couple. Fuuck, That.
  • Options
    You don't have to do an online degree program through a Texas school.  You can do one through the 10 bajillion other schools that offer online programs.  Western Kentucky University offers a distance learning program for a MA in History.

    If your school is as crappy and awful as you say it is, I would honestly do some major research on online degrees if you're unwilling to relocate.  And as far as relocation goes, I have a few friends who are married and LD because one of them simply can't find a job where they are.  It sucks, but they're making it work.  And in your case, you're looking at a degree in a field where you need to teach.  Meaning that your degree is going to be important, making the school it came from important.  
    Obviously, you are going to do whatever you want, but I would look very hard at your decision before applying to only one school.  Even in the case of a guaranteed acceptance, most people will tell you that's not a good idea.  Anything can happen once that application leaves your hands.  And there could be 30 other people with better applications than you'll submit (not saying yours is bad, just that in this economy, everyone is going back to school) and so even though your recommender told you (s)he wants you there, it may not happen.

    Just some things you should think about...
    I french with my man
    Daisypath Anniversary tickers
  • Options
    Diito peekaboo, there are a LOT of non-Texas schools that have online programs.  There are online-only schools specifically for graduate degrees, even.  Capella and Walden are two of those, though I don't know much about them.  I know that University of Maryland offers online degrees nationwide, I'm sure there are a ton of places you could enroll.  Just do some research and see if it's an option for you.

    I know that an LDR would suck, but so does not being able to get a job.  You have to make some tough decisions about your future.  Your ability to get a job and have a good career will have a big impact on your marriage, so it's important to realize that making decisions for a better education aren't really at the expense of your marriage, but for the benefit of it.
    Image and video hosting by TinyPic
    Lilypie First Birthday tickers
  • Options
    Laura has a great point about the LDR.  Yes, it blows.  Beyond belief.  But, FI and I are doing it so that he can get a job in the field he wants and I can get my masters degree in what I want.  It's not possible in the same state.  So, we've been LD for 2 years.  And we're about to be LD for at least 2 more.  I hate to push the wedding back that far (3 years, because he wants us to be together to plan), but we've decided it's necessary for us.

    My point of all that is that we don't want to start our marriage out with one of us having had to sacrifice so much that there's a certain amount of resent there for the rest of our lives.  It's something that you should seriously think about.
    I french with my man
    Daisypath Anniversary tickers
  • Options
    In Response to <a href="http://forums.theknot.com/Sites/theknot/Pages/Main.aspx/special-topic-wedding-boards_students_grad-school?plckFindPostKey=Cat:Special%20Topic%20Wedding%20BoardsForum:684Discussion:2b5d8e09-5c2b-4e4c-bbba-9e49e73ee48ePost:ba83b1f3-66bd-4333-b6d5-f1ffb0ba16fd">Re: Grad school</a>:
    [QUOTE]Diito peekaboo, there are a LOT of non-Texas schools that have online programs.  There are online-only schools specifically for graduate degrees, even.  Capella and Walden are two of those, though I don't know much about them.  I know that University of Maryland offers online degrees nationwide, I'm sure there are a ton of places you could enroll.  Just do some research and see if it's an option for you. I know that an LDR would suck, but so does not being able to get a job.  You have to make some tough decisions about your future.  Your ability to get a job and have a good career will have a big impact on your marriage, so it's important to realize that making decisions for a better education aren't really at the expense of your marriage, but for the benefit of it.
    Posted by LauraT25[/QUOTE]

    <div>
    </div><div>I must have misunderstood about online classes. I'll look into them though. I'm just wary of online graduate classes I guess.</div><div>
    </div><div>
    </div><div>Sorry for the long delay</div>
This discussion has been closed.
Choose Another Board
Search Boards