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Invites and Paper

Proper invitation wording

So I'm ordering invitations next week and I was planning on using the "Together with their families" language because it seemed to be the one that caused the least amount of drama. I haven't actually told my FILs this but tonight my FMIL informed me tonight that she is concerned about invitation wording. I asked her what she meant and she said, "Oh, I don't know," and changed the subject. I'm thinking that since they are hosting the wedding with us, they want to be included by name which I'm fine with but not sure how the wording would be then. Would my parents names be included then? Would that look too wordy? TIA!

Re: Proper invitation wording

  • Well that does make things simpler than "son of" and "daughter of." Thank you!
  • Thank you!  This is exactly what I was looking for.  
    CMGr, my mom doesn't like the sound of "request the pleasure of our company" but we are having our ceremony at our reception venue.  Is it acceptable to use "request the honor of your presence" for a non-church wedding?
    Daisypath Anniversary tickers
  • Thank you!  This is exactly what I was looking for.  
    CMGr, my mom doesn't like the sound of "request the pleasure of our company" but we are having our ceremony at our reception venue.  Is it acceptable to use "request the honor of your presence" for a non-church wedding?
    Nope, this is only reserved for church weddings.  I didn't know this either until I read it on here from CMGr.
  • Really? I never knew that "request the honor of your presence" was only related to church weddings...interesting.
    NerdyLucy
  • The rationale is that you can't invite people to a church -- it's a public space. That's why you're asking for the "honour of their presence." But you CAN invite them to a private area, so a non-church building is "pleasure of your company." 

    In theory, you could refuse admittance to anyone at your reception venue, but you couldn't at your church.
    Anniversary

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    I'm gonna go with 'not my circus, not my monkeys.'
  • What you have read so far are responses about the traditional way to word the location - that a church is "request/presence" and a non-church is "pleasure/company."

    However, in some areas of the country, there is a modern application of these phrases, especially since there are many more outdoor and non-church locations being used for weddings than years ago.

    The new, modern rule goes like this:

    If your wedding will be religious in nature, and mention God, etc., then you can use "request the honour of your presence.'  If your wedding will not be religious in any way, then you can use "pleasure of your company."

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