Wedding Reception Forum

seating plan tips ?

Anyone got any tips for the seating plan?

We have 6 days and we need to get it started but anyone got anytips?

Re: seating plan tips ?

  • That's a pretty general question, but here goes:

    When we arranged seating plans, we put family members together at the same table. For example, my husband has 3 brothers, each with their own families. I invited 6 cousins, and only have one aunt left. They all sat at one table. Put family members together who are close, depending on the size of your tables, you may have to split them. We had round tables that sat up to 9 or 10 comfortably. When faced with an uneven number of people, I had some tables with 6, some with 9. I put all my coworkers and their spouses at one table, had a table of friends who knew each other, etc.

  • laradoll said:
    Anyone got any tips for the seating plan?

    We have 6 days and we need to get it started but anyone got anytips?
    We divided our RSVPs into 3 general groups.....my family, DH's family and our friends.  We figured out tables for our friends, my mom did our family and DH's mom did his family.  For table organization, we had immediate family of both sides on either side of our sweetheart table.  It fanned out continuing with family and then friends.   This way, larger groups of family or friends were still next to each other tablewise.

    If you haven't already, find out minimum and maximum table capacity.  Our venue allowed us between 7 and 12 people.  Knowing this will help tremendously.
  • I had people who can't stand each other, including family members, so I started there with spreading them around. Then we kept families together (except one of my aunts who had specifically requested to sit with friends of mine she had heard about and wanted to get to know...haha!), people who are friends together, and tried to put the people who didn't know many people with people we thought they would like. 


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  • MobKazMobKaz member
    First Anniversary First Comment First Answer 5 Love Its
    To ease the amount of writing and erasing, we wrote guest names on small Post-it strips.  We color coded the strips; blue for bride, green for groom, and yellow for friends.  We attached the names to paper plates, which we laid upside down.  

    We could then lay the plates out as they would appear in the actual reception room.  It was very easy to visualize how the room would be set up.  If "people" needed to be rearranged, it was so simple to lift and replace the Post-it strips.


  • We separated guests into the following groups: my mom's side, my dad's side, my family friends and co-workers, H's mom's side, H's step-dad's side, H's dad's side, H's family friends, and our friends.  We generally sat people in the above groups together, with a couple of exceptions.  We used www.weddingwire.com to do our seating plan.  You do need to enter guests' names, but then you can easily move around tables and put guests at tables.  Using this method, our seating arrangements took me less than an hour.
  • As people RSVP'd, I put them at tables. I put them at whatever table made sense at that given moment (so assuming no other person RSVP'd). Each time someone RSVP'd I made adjustments.

    Like others, we put immediate family to the immediate right and left of us. My parents are divorced so my dad and his side of the family got the table second closest to ours (my parents aren't going to be at each other's throats so it's ok to have their tables next to each other). We kept tables of older people away from the DJ. 

    If we had to split a family or group of friends, we did an even or almost even split. If there are 12 friends and only 10 people fit at a table, it's better to do 6 at one table and 6 at another than to take one couple and put them elsewhere.

    We had a few couples who didn't know anyone else. We were careful not to put them at a table where everyone knows each other. That could be uncomfortable. We found tables where we thought people might have some common interest even though they don't know each other.
  • mlg78mlg78 member
    First Anniversary 5 Love Its First Answer Name Dropper
    Much like Libby I have already created lists of various groups: My mom's family, my dad's family, my stepdad's family, my coworkers, peeps I volunteer with, my friends, his friends, his mom's side, his dad's side.  I think that's it...  It'll break things down enough that each group, even in a large wedding should be 1-3 tables each which is much more manageable.
  • I would just let your guests pick where they want to sit. I am not a fan of going to weddings and having to sit by people I dont really know!

  • jennac77 said:
    I would just let your guests pick where they want to sit. I am not a fan of going to weddings and having to sit by people I dont really know!
    But that's actually more likely to happen at a wedding where there are no seating arrangements and guests are left to fend for themselves.

    Assigning tables on the basis of family membership or some other criteria for common acquaintance, like co-workership or co-membership in a group, helps place everyone at a table where there should be at least one other person they know (besides their own escort).
  • Jen4948 said:

    jennac77 said:
    I would just let your guests pick where they want to sit. I am not a fan of going to weddings and having to sit by people I dont really know!
    But that's actually more likely to happen at a wedding where there are no seating arrangements and guests are left to fend for themselves.

    Assigning tables on the basis of family membership or some other criteria for common acquaintance, like co-workership or co-membership in a group, helps place everyone at a table where there should be at least one other person they know (besides their own escort).
    Agree.  Having no seating assignments is reminiscent of a middle school cafeteria....running around to try and find the people you know only to find their table full and the only tables with empty chairs are with people you don't know.

    OP - A good host will make sure you are seated with the appropriate people.
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