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Catholic Weddings

Catholic and Non-Catholic

Hi,

Has anyone had a Catholic wedding with one of you not being Catholic or Christian?

I'm wondering if the mass is different since they cannot receive communion.

Thanks,
Cristina

Re: Catholic and Non-Catholic

  • mica178mica178 member
    5000 Comments Fourth Anniversary
    edited December 2011
    Yes.  If you have the full nuptial mass, the non-Catholics in attendance would not receive Communion but would be blessed by the priest.  Or you could skip the mass and just have the marriage ceremony.  In that case, after the Homily, there would be the marriage vows, and that would be it.  No Prayers of Intention, no Apostle's Creed, no Lord's Prayer, and no Communion.  Many priests recommend skipping the mass if one of the couple isn't Catholic.
  • agapecarrieagapecarrie member
    Knottie Warrior 1000 Comments 100 Love Its Combo Breaker
    edited December 2011
    In Response to <a href="http://forums.theknot.com/Sites/theknot/Pages/Main.aspx/cultural-wedding-boards_catholic-weddings_catholic-non-catholic?plckFindPostKey=Cat:Cultural%20Wedding%20BoardsForum:615Discussion:67224a8d-8116-4e13-9a2b-6b728424e145Post:51b3137e-0115-41b1-8980-830739a10d8a">Re: Catholic and Non-Catholic</a>:
    [QUOTE]Yes.  If you have the full nuptial mass, the non-Catholics in attendance would not receive Communion but would be blessed by the priest.  Or you could skip the mass and just have the marriage ceremony.  In that case, after the Homily, there would be the marriage vows, and that would be it.  No Prayers of Intention, no Apostle's Creed, no Lord's Prayer, and no Communion.  Many priests recommend skipping the mass if one of the couple isn't Catholic.
    Posted by mica178[/QUOTE]

    Actually, the rite of marriage outside of mass does call for intentions, Lord's prayer, and sign of peace. The Eucharistic prayer (consecration) and reception of communion is omitted.

    The apostle creed is never said at massb. The Nicene creed is said on Sundays and solemnties, and is usually never done at weddings (there are exceptions).
  • edited December 2011
    Dh is not Catholic.  We had communion during our ceremony.  The priest blessed Dh and then I received communion.  It's recommended to not have communion if one of you isn't Catholic, but it was important to both myself and DH, who plans to convert to Catholicism.   
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  • edited December 2011
    My FI is not Catholic, or even baptised for that matter, so there will not be a full mass. In some instances the Priest might allow a full mass even if only one of your are baptised. If that is the case then there will be communion and it will be just like a regular service and those that are not practicing Catholicism will just stay seated during that part of the mass.
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  • cribbiecribbie member
    10 Comments
    edited December 2011
    My FI is not baptized as well and I know that changes things a bit too.
  • mica178mica178 member
    5000 Comments Fourth Anniversary
    edited December 2011
    Talk with your priest.  You can apply for a marriage dispensation if your FI isn't baptised.  I don't know about the full mass, though.  If he isn't baptised, I'm going to guess that most of his family wouldn't be able to take Communion.  Some priests feel that if a significant portion of the guests in attendance cannot take Communion, a full mass might be more separating than unifying.
  • agapecarrieagapecarrie member
    Knottie Warrior 1000 Comments 100 Love Its Combo Breaker
    edited December 2011
    When one person isn't baptized, the only option is the marriage rite in a liturgy of the word, with no Mass.
  • edited December 2011
    I have another question regarding Catholic and non-Catholic.  FI is not Catholic, I am.  Is Pre-Cana required in this situation?  I believe its required for any wedding within the Catholic church, but was wondering...
  • agapecarrieagapecarrie member
    Knottie Warrior 1000 Comments 100 Love Its Combo Breaker
    edited December 2011
    In Response to <a href="http://forums.theknot.com/Sites/theknot/Pages/Main.aspx/cultural-wedding-boards_catholic-weddings_catholic-non-catholic?plckFindPostKey=Cat:Cultural%20Wedding%20BoardsForum:615Discussion:67224a8d-8116-4e13-9a2b-6b728424e145Post:d34e9ada-a25d-4952-a7e1-5f685e838851">Re: Catholic and Non-Catholic</a>:
    [QUOTE]I have another question regarding Catholic and non-Catholic.  FI is not Catholic, I am.  Is Pre-Cana required in this situation?  I believe its required for any wedding within the Catholic church, but was wondering...
    Posted by [email protected][/QUOTE]

    All the more reason to have it.
  • cribbiecribbie member
    10 Comments
    edited December 2011
    I have to schedule an appointment and see. I did hear on another thread that it's not considered a sacrament when one party is not baptized. Most my FI's family is Christian and his grandparents are Catholic but his siblings are the only ones not baptized since his father was Morman and grew up Morman for a few years before his parents divorced.
  • Riss91Riss91 member
    Eighth Anniversary 1000 Comments 25 Love Its Name Dropper
    edited December 2011
    In Response to <a href="http://forums.theknot.com/Sites/theknot/Pages/Main.aspx/cultural-wedding-boards_catholic-weddings_catholic-non-catholic?plckFindPostKey=Cat:Cultural%20Wedding%20BoardsForum:615Discussion:67224a8d-8116-4e13-9a2b-6b728424e145Post:8bbca37c-8a56-4594-a379-7fe6438a219d">Re: Catholic and Non-Catholic</a>:
    [QUOTE]I have to schedule an appointment and see. I did hear on another thread that it's not considered a sacrament when one party is not baptized. Most my FI's family is Christian and his grandparents are Catholic but his siblings are the only ones not baptized since his father was Morman and grew up Morman for a few years before his parents divorced.
    Posted by cribbie[/QUOTE]
    I think you are correct re-garding the sacramental vs. non-sacramental marriage. Both are considered valid marriages in the eyes of the church.<u> <a href="http://forums.catholic.com/showthread.php?t=129561" target="_blank">This site</a> </u>has some helpful information on the topic.
  • agapecarrieagapecarrie member
    Knottie Warrior 1000 Comments 100 Love Its Combo Breaker
    edited December 2011
    Mormon's don't have the trinitarian baptism that Christian's do. Both people must be baptized for it to be a sacrament.

    However, you still can enter into a valid natural marriage, and still must go through the church, do marriage prep, etc.
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