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Worst Halloween Costumes 2013

I went to a Halloween party this weekend. There were tons of really awesome/creative costumes and then, inevitably, the "sexy" versions of normal things (e.g. a butterfly, a nun, a ninja turtle, a police officer, etc.). I can't wrap my head around trying to make normal things sexy for Halloween, but these types of costumes provide me with great entertainment value and make me laugh so whatever.

However, there was one "sexy" costume that was actually really disturbing and shocking. One girl came as "sexy" Elizabeth Short/Black Dahlia. Yes - the real life serial killer victim. She wore an extremely short, skin tight, cleavage baring, nude dress and then painted on bloody markings like those of the real victim including the "smile" and told everyone she was "sexy Dahlia". It is easily the most messed up costume I have ever seen.

I also heard about Julianne Hough's costume and the guys who went as Treyvon Martin and George Zimmerman. What is with these messed up costumes? Has anyone else seen anything like this?
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Re: Worst Halloween Costumes 2013

  • Eh it's Halloween. It's the one day a year where girls can wear clothes that are unacceptable all other days of the year and not be judged for it. I don't think it's anything to get upset about. 

    Worst costume I saw from last year was a coworker who went as the lead singer for INXS... post suicide. I thought that was really tacky.

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    melbelleup
  • SBmini said:
    Eh it's Halloween. It's the one day a year where girls can wear clothes that are unacceptable all other days of the year and not be judged for it. I don't think it's anything to get upset about. 

    Worst costume I saw from last year was a coworker who went as the lead singer for INXS... post suicide. I thought that was really tacky.

    You think it's tacky to go as a singer who committed suicide but you don't think it's anything to get upset about if someone goes as a slutted up version of a serial killer's victim?
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    [Deleted User]melbelleupdoeydogolden1215
  • climbingwifeclimbingwife NYC 'burbs member
    10000 Comments Fifth Anniversary 500 Love Its 5 Answers
    Slutoween! I have seen many slutty Halloween costumes show up in my FB newsfeed. I saw one sexy Ninja Turtle. 

    The George Zimmerman/Trayvon Martin costume is positively disgusting. 

    [Deleted User]melbelleup16maybeless
  • SBmini said:
    Eh it's Halloween. It's the one day a year where girls can wear clothes that are unacceptable all other days of the year and not be judged for it. I don't think it's anything to get upset about. 

    Worst costume I saw from last year was a coworker who went as the lead singer for INXS... post suicide. I thought that was really tacky.

    You think it's tacky to go as a singer who committed suicide but you don't think it's anything to get upset about if someone goes as a slutted up version of a serial killer's victim?
    Where exactly did I say that? Stop over reacting, I was commenting on your sentiments in general about sexy costumes. 
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  • SBmini said:
    SBmini said:
    Eh it's Halloween. It's the one day a year where girls can wear clothes that are unacceptable all other days of the year and not be judged for it. I don't think it's anything to get upset about. 

    Worst costume I saw from last year was a coworker who went as the lead singer for INXS... post suicide. I thought that was really tacky.

    You think it's tacky to go as a singer who committed suicide but you don't think it's anything to get upset about if someone goes as a slutted up version of a serial killer's victim?
    Where exactly did I say that? Stop over reacting, I was commenting on your sentiments in general about sexy costumes. 
    Like where I said I don't understand "sexy" costumes but it provides entertainment value and makes me laugh? 

    The part I said bothered me was the slutted up version of a serial killer's victim and other disturbing costumes. So when you said "get upset about" obviously I thought you were referred to what I expressed was upsetting - not what I said made me laugh. 
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  • We took the sexy Halloween costume more literally this year. Please excuse the nip slip. The man's not used to wearing a bra!

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    16maybelessDreamergirl8812
  • I don't know which is worse, the fact that this post made me google Julianne Hough, the most uninteresting person on the planet, or what she did for her costume.

    Blech. 

    golden1215daveANDkristenchibiyui
  • WinstonsGirlWinstonsGirl The Cold North member
    Tenth Anniversary 2500 Comments 500 Love Its 5 Answers
    What did she do??  I can google it too, but I'm being lazy.  I can never do sexy, cos I'm not buying 2 costumes for Halloween.  It has to be school work safe.  The kids keep asking me what I'm going as, and I keep answering a grumpy cheer coach/gym teacher.  I'm actually going as Sue Sylvester from Glee, so it fits.  I really just want to yell at kids al day long through a megaphone.  ;)
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    erinlin25smalfrie19maryemooDreamergirl8812
  • I don't get sexy versions of non-sexy things either. Sexy sailor/cop/fairy? not my style, but I can understand the appeal. But why the fuck do sexy dragons exist? or sexy rainbow brite? 

    Who looks at a ninja turtle and says "hey this would make a really sexy costume," rather than "I'm going to be a tmnt 'cause Mickey's the coolest! Cowabunga!"

    I am Jack's confusion.
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    Gustafson28
  • What did she do??  I can google it too, but I'm being lazy.  I can never do sexy, cos I'm not buying 2 costumes for Halloween.  It has to be school work safe.  The kids keep asking me what I'm going as, and I keep answering a grumpy cheer coach/gym teacher.  I'm actually going as Sue Sylvester from Glee, so it fits.  I really just want to yell at kids al day long through a megaphone.  ;)

    A) I love that you are going as Sue.

    B) Julianne Hough (I never even heard of her until Halloween, but apparently she's a celebrity) dressed as character from a TV show. Julianne is white, and the character she dressed up as is black. Because she used makeup to appear black, she's under fire for dressing up in blackface (which historically entailed white men using stuff to appear black, dressing in rags, and playing racial stereotypes for laughs). Blackface was pretty degrading.

    I'm sure this will spark all kinds of TK rage, so disclaimer: I'm not racist. And not being black, I can't fully understand the impact this might have on some black people. But honestly, I don't see why it's a big deal. It's dressing up. As a character. Julianne wasn't like, "Ohhh, I hate black people. I'm going to dress like one and degrade them!" She dressed up as a character on television, who coincidently, is black. In this case, it was as innocent as wearing a red wig to dress up as Annie. 

    I'm not sure if you watch America's Next Top Model, but during the "short cycle" Tyra had the girls made up to look like they were a blend of two different ethnicities. Someone cried "black face" and hated on her for that, too.

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    [Deleted User]erinlin25
  • Chipmunk415Chipmunk415 at the corner of Wine Ave. and Margarita Ln. member
    500 Love Its 1000 Comments Second Anniversary Name Dropper

    Gosh, I guess I should be apologizing for that time in middle school I was involved in the children's theater, and was a background Traveller for Babes In Toyland- I had to use a brown toned makeup to cover my face, neck, and hands because I otherwise glowed under the lights with my fair skin.

    Should I also apologize for being cast as one of the Wise Men in a Christmas performance? To look older, male, and Middle Eastern, at age 12, I put on a medium brown makeup and used about 6 cases of eye shadow to get the stubbled beard look, since we didn't have the funding for quality beards for any character.

  • edited October 2013
    ElcaB said:

    What did she do??  I can google it too, but I'm being lazy.  I can never do sexy, cos I'm not buying 2 costumes for Halloween.  It has to be school work safe.  The kids keep asking me what I'm going as, and I keep answering a grumpy cheer coach/gym teacher.  I'm actually going as Sue Sylvester from Glee, so it fits.  I really just want to yell at kids al day long through a megaphone.  ;)



    A) I love that you are going as Sue.


    B) Julianne Hough (I never even heard of her until Halloween, but apparently she's a celebrity) dressed as character from a TV show. Julianne is white, and the character she dressed up as is black. Because she used makeup to appear black, she's under fire for dressing up in blackface (which historically entailed white men using stuff to appear black, dressing in rags, and playing racial stereotypes for laughs). Blackface was pretty degrading.


    I'm sure this will spark all kinds of TK rage, so disclaimer: I'm not racist. And not being black, I can't fully understand the impact this might have on some black people. But honestly, I don't see why it's a big deal. It's dressing up. As a character. Julianne wasn't like, "Ohhh, I hate black people. I'm going to dress like one and degrade them!" She dressed up as a character on television, who coincidently, is black. In this case, it was as innocent as wearing a red wig to dress up as Annie. 


    I'm not sure if you watch America's Next Top Model, but during the "short cycle" Tyra had the girls made up to look like they were a blend of two different ethnicities. Someone cried "black face" and hated on her for that, too.



    ____________________________________________________________


    I have to disagree here. Unless you want to draw a feeble connection to the persecution of Irish people, I don't think redheads ever went through any of the same struggles that black people have gone through and I don't think having red hair or wearing a red wig has ever signified the setbacks that blackface/racism have.  

    Wearing black face was used in the entertainment industry to proliferate degrading and super racist stereotypes of black people. Is has taken generations to educate and attempt to correct these perpetuated stereotypes - although less prevalent now, these stereotypes can be seen all over the place, so this struggle isn't over. 

    My aunts/uncles were teenagers when schools were still segregated - the civil rights struggle is not very far removed from my generation (I'm 28). 

    I guess that's why I see an issue with it. It's a really degrading symbol of an extremely racist and trying time for black civil rights. 

    ETA: quote boxes
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    golden1215chibiyuiSteelHibiscus
  • ElcaB said:

    What did she do??  I can google it too, but I'm being lazy.  I can never do sexy, cos I'm not buying 2 costumes for Halloween.  It has to be school work safe.  The kids keep asking me what I'm going as, and I keep answering a grumpy cheer coach/gym teacher.  I'm actually going as Sue Sylvester from Glee, so it fits.  I really just want to yell at kids al day long through a megaphone.  ;)


    A) I love that you are going as Sue.

    B) Julianne Hough (I never even heard of her until Halloween, but apparently she's a celebrity) dressed as character from a TV show. Julianne is white, and the character she dressed up as is black. Because she used makeup to appear black, she's under fire for dressing up in blackface (which historically entailed white men using stuff to appear black, dressing in rags, and playing racial stereotypes for laughs). Blackface was pretty degrading.

    I'm sure this will spark all kinds of TK rage, so disclaimer: I'm not racist. And not being black, I can't fully understand the impact this might have on some black people. But honestly, I don't see why it's a big deal. It's dressing up. As a character. Julianne wasn't like, "Ohhh, I hate black people. I'm going to dress like one and degrade them!" She dressed up as a character on television, who coincidently, is black. In this case, it was as innocent as wearing a red wig to dress up as Annie. 

    I'm not sure if you watch America's Next Top Model, but during the "short cycle" Tyra had the girls made up to look like they were a blend of two different ethnicities. Someone cried "black face" and hated on her for that, too.


    ____________________________________________________________
    I have to disagree here. Unless you want to draw a feeble connection to the persecution of Irish people, I don't think redheads ever went through any of the same struggles that black people have gone through and I don't think having red hair or wearing a red wig has ever signified the setbacks that blackface/racism have.  

    Wearing black face was used in the entertainment industry to proliferate degrading and super racist stereotypes of black people. Is has taken generations to educate and attempt to correct these perpetuated stereotypes - although less prevalent now, these stereotypes can be seen all over the place, so this struggle isn't over. 

    My aunts/uncles were teenagers when schools were still segregated - the civil rights struggle is not very far removed from my generation (I'm 28). 

    I guess that's why I see an issue with it. It's a really degrading symbol of an extremely racist and trying time for black civil rights. 

    ETA: quote boxes

    I completely understand what you're saying. I should clarify: What I meant with the wig analogy was that Julianne's intent wasn't malicious.

    You're right, we have come a long way. But by definition, blackface involves darkening skin and humiliating, making fun of, [insert negative verb here] a race of people. All she did was put on the makeup to look like someone, so it seems silly to me that she was bashed for it.

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  • ElcaB said:
    ElcaB said:

    What did she do??  I can google it too, but I'm being lazy.  I can never do sexy, cos I'm not buying 2 costumes for Halloween.  It has to be school work safe.  The kids keep asking me what I'm going as, and I keep answering a grumpy cheer coach/gym teacher.  I'm actually going as Sue Sylvester from Glee, so it fits.  I really just want to yell at kids al day long through a megaphone.  ;)


    A) I love that you are going as Sue.

    B) Julianne Hough (I never even heard of her until Halloween, but apparently she's a celebrity) dressed as character from a TV show. Julianne is white, and the character she dressed up as is black. Because she used makeup to appear black, she's under fire for dressing up in blackface (which historically entailed white men using stuff to appear black, dressing in rags, and playing racial stereotypes for laughs). Blackface was pretty degrading.

    I'm sure this will spark all kinds of TK rage, so disclaimer: I'm not racist. And not being black, I can't fully understand the impact this might have on some black people. But honestly, I don't see why it's a big deal. It's dressing up. As a character. Julianne wasn't like, "Ohhh, I hate black people. I'm going to dress like one and degrade them!" She dressed up as a character on television, who coincidently, is black. In this case, it was as innocent as wearing a red wig to dress up as Annie. 

    I'm not sure if you watch America's Next Top Model, but during the "short cycle" Tyra had the girls made up to look like they were a blend of two different ethnicities. Someone cried "black face" and hated on her for that, too.


    ____________________________________________________________
    I have to disagree here. Unless you want to draw a feeble connection to the persecution of Irish people, I don't think redheads ever went through any of the same struggles that black people have gone through and I don't think having red hair or wearing a red wig has ever signified the setbacks that blackface/racism have.  

    Wearing black face was used in the entertainment industry to proliferate degrading and super racist stereotypes of black people. Is has taken generations to educate and attempt to correct these perpetuated stereotypes - although less prevalent now, these stereotypes can be seen all over the place, so this struggle isn't over. 

    My aunts/uncles were teenagers when schools were still segregated - the civil rights struggle is not very far removed from my generation (I'm 28). 

    I guess that's why I see an issue with it. It's a really degrading symbol of an extremely racist and trying time for black civil rights. 

    ETA: quote boxes

    I completely understand what you're saying. I should clarify: What I meant with the wig analogy was that Julianne's intent wasn't malicious.

    You're right, we have come a long way. But by definition, blackface involves darkening skin and humiliating, making fun of, [insert negative verb here] a race of people. All she did was put on the makeup to look like someone, so it seems silly to me that she was bashed for it.


    It's silly to you because you probably don't understand the intricacies of white privilege.     
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    chibiyuiSteelHibiscusFran1985 bride2b71614
  • I think this is a really interesting (and charged!) topic. I think when it comes to race and costumes, there's a line that should be drawn, and blackface is on one side of that line due to its history, but where other choices fall is a bit fuzzier to me.

    Is it OK for me to put on white makeup to dress as a geisha and dye my hair black, or to put on fake freckles or a sombrero and poncho? I don't have a good answer, really. None of the above really seem all that bad to me, but then I'm white, so yeah.

    As for the whole sexy thing, that doesn't bother me, though I don't do it myself! I definitely don't like sexy kids' costumes though...
  • ElcaBElcaB member
    2500 Comments Fifth Anniversary 500 Love Its First Answer
    edited October 2013

    @golden1215, I'd feel completely differently if she did do blackface, which again, is defined as someone darkening their skin to play to black stereotypes. Point is, she didn't. It is silly when people accuse others of doing things they didn't do, especially when it's such a sensitive topic.

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  • chibiyuichibiyui The Boring Part of MD member
    5000 Comments 500 Love Its Fourth Anniversary 5 Answers

    I think this is a really interesting (and charged!) topic. I think when it comes to race and costumes, there's a line that should be drawn, and blackface is on one side of that line due to its history, but where other choices fall is a bit fuzzier to me.

    Is it OK for me to put on white makeup to dress as a geisha and dye my hair black, or to put on fake freckles or a sombrero and poncho? I don't have a good answer, really. None of the above really seem all that bad to me, but then I'm white, so yeah.

    As for the whole sexy thing, that doesn't bother me, though I don't do it myself! I definitely don't like sexy kids' costumes though...

    No, dressing as a geisha or "mexican" is still pretty offensive. That is someones culture your using as a costume.
    You can dress up as a character, like Mulan, you could even dye your hair, but any kind of make up to make yourself look Asain is not cool. You could Dress up as Frida Kahlo, and use make up to give your self a unibrow, but darkening your skin would not be cool.
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    Anniversary
  • ElcaB said:

    @golden1215, I'd feel completely differently if she did do blackface, which again, is defined as someone darkening their skin to play to black stereotypes. Point is, she didn't. It is silly when people accuse others of doing things they didn't do, especially when it's such a sensitive topic.

    how is spraying painting your face dark to portray a black TV show character not blackface?

    she may not have meant it to be malicious, but it shows a complete lack of understanding of the daily realities and difficulties that black people face which, if you ask me, is just as bad as malice. ignorance of the privileges of being white is the reason racism is still so prevalent in America.

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    chibiyuiSteelHibiscus
  • I agree that this is a really charged topic. I work at a university, so issues of students dressing up like ethnic minorities is an issue pretty much every year. I've done a lot of reading on it that's highlighted a lot of stuff that I, as a white person, was not aware of. 

    At the end of the day, it doesn't really matter if a person intended to cause offense. It matters that they caused offense, and they should apologize and listen and try to take corrective action. I recently heard a good analogy that really helped me think about it: Let's say I stepped on your foot by accident. I certainly didn't mean to, but I did, and it hurt you. Should I not apologize because it was an accident?
    golden1215chibiyuiKeptInStitches
  •  

    ElcaB said:

    @golden1215, I'd feel completely differently if she did do blackface, which again, is defined as someone darkening their skin to play to black stereotypes. Point is, she didn't. It is silly when people accuse others of doing things they didn't do, especially when it's such a sensitive topic.

    how is spraying painting your face dark to portray a black TV show character not blackface?

    she may not have meant it to be malicious, but it shows a complete lack of understanding of the daily realities and difficulties that black people face which, if you ask me, is just as bad as malice. ignorance of the privileges of being white is the reason racism is still so prevalent in America.

    Because, for the third time, blackface is darkening your skin to make fun of a race of people. She wasn't making fun of anyone or stereotyping black people to degrade them.

    Did she use poor judgment when she decided to portray a black character, knowing she's in the public eye and that it's a sensitive topic? Sure. Should she be slandered and labeled someone who disrespects black people because of it? Nope.

    Also, I have to tell you you're wrong when you write, "Ignorance of the privileges of being white is the reason racism is so prevalent in America." Racism has many forms and it does not limit itself to one race of people. No race is exempt from racism, so for you to pin racism on white privilege is completely wrong.

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    APDSS22
  • ElcaB said:

     

    ElcaB said:

    @golden1215, I'd feel completely differently if she did do blackface, which again, is defined as someone darkening their skin to play to black stereotypes. Point is, she didn't. It is silly when people accuse others of doing things they didn't do, especially when it's such a sensitive topic.

    how is spraying painting your face dark to portray a black TV show character not blackface?

    she may not have meant it to be malicious, but it shows a complete lack of understanding of the daily realities and difficulties that black people face which, if you ask me, is just as bad as malice. ignorance of the privileges of being white is the reason racism is still so prevalent in America.

    Because, for the third time, blackface is darkening your skin to make fun of a race of people. She wasn't making fun of anyone or stereotyping black people to degrade them.

    Did she use poor judgment when she decided to portray a black character, knowing she's in the public eye and that it's a sensitive topic? Sure. Should she be slandered and labeled someone who disrespects black people because of it? Nope.

    Also, I have to tell you you're wrong when you write, "Ignorance of the privileges of being white is the reason racism is so prevalent in America." Racism has many forms and it does not limit itself to one race of people. No race is exempt from racism, so for you to pin racism on white privilege is completely wrong.

    Take an actual course or go to a conference on white privilege and then come back and we can have this conversation. Can minority groups be bigots and dislike people for the color of their skin? Sure. That's not the same as systemic and systematic racism, which is driven by white people, whether you care to admit it or not.
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    SteelHibiscus
  • climbingwifeclimbingwife NYC 'burbs member
    10000 Comments Fifth Anniversary 500 Love Its 5 Answers
    Maybe I'm a prude, but a picture of an infant in a mermaid costume kind of made me raise my eyebrows. So I did a little search. These appear to be pretty popular. What do you guys think?


    ElcaBDreamergirl8812
  • smalfrie19smalfrie19 Home of SB XLVIII Champs member
    500 Love Its 1000 Comments Fourth Anniversary Name Dropper
    Maybe I'm a prude, but a picture of an infant in a mermaid costume kind of made me raise my eyebrows. So I did a little search. These appear to be pretty popular. What do you guys think?


    aww..I think its kind of cute! ..but that may just be me!
    Anniversary
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  • chibiyuichibiyui The Boring Part of MD member
    5000 Comments 500 Love Its Fourth Anniversary 5 Answers
    Its a bit twee, but it doesn't get an eyebrow raise from me.
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    Anniversary
  • ElcaB said:

     

    ElcaB said:

    @golden1215, I'd feel completely differently if she did do blackface, which again, is defined as someone darkening their skin to play to black stereotypes. Point is, she didn't. It is silly when people accuse others of doing things they didn't do, especially when it's such a sensitive topic.

    how is spraying painting your face dark to portray a black TV show character not blackface?

    she may not have meant it to be malicious, but it shows a complete lack of understanding of the daily realities and difficulties that black people face which, if you ask me, is just as bad as malice. ignorance of the privileges of being white is the reason racism is still so prevalent in America.

    Because, for the third time, blackface is darkening your skin to make fun of a race of people. She wasn't making fun of anyone or stereotyping black people to degrade them.

    Did she use poor judgment when she decided to portray a black character, knowing she's in the public eye and that it's a sensitive topic? Sure. Should she be slandered and labeled someone who disrespects black people because of it? Nope.

    Also, I have to tell you you're wrong when you write, "Ignorance of the privileges of being white is the reason racism is so prevalent in America." Racism has many forms and it does not limit itself to one race of people. No race is exempt from racism, so for you to pin racism on white privilege is completely wrong.

    Take an actual course or go to a conference on white privilege and then come back and we can have this conversation. Can minority groups be bigots and dislike people for the color of their skin? Sure. That's not the same as systemic and systematic racism, which is driven by white people, whether you care to admit it or not.

    I sincerely mean this in a good-natured way (like I always say, it's hard to tell snark from sincerity when you read stuff from strangers): I've never heard of the white privilege conference, but I couldn't help but laugh because the title makes me think of a bunch of rich, entitled white people dressed in their finest and indulging in Dom Perignon while they laugh about how underprivileged other races are (think previews of Marie Antoinette, where champagne spills from a tower of champagne glasses and they eat all those desserts). Of course, I know that's far from the case because you obviously wouldn't bring it up unless you were trying to prove your point (and also because I googled it).

    Obviously we both feel differently about Julianne & the Blackface Debate. Okay, that's cool. Let's agree to disagree and get on with our days.

    Now, about the infant mermaid costumes....

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  • APDSS22APDSS22 O-K-L-A-H-O-M-A is OK member
    Fifth Anniversary 1000 Comments 500 Love Its First Answer
    Maybe I'm a prude, but a picture of an infant in a mermaid costume kind of made me raise my eyebrows. So I did a little search. These appear to be pretty popular. What do you guys think?

    My sister was only 3 months old when she had her first Halloween.  My mom wrapped her in a "costume" of a mermaid.  It was basically a onesie with a shiny green material in the shape of a mermaid fin at the bottom and she only wore it for a couple pictures.  I don't even think my parents took her out trick or treating with us that year.  This is a little more risque.

  • chibiyuichibiyui The Boring Part of MD member
    5000 Comments 500 Love Its Fourth Anniversary 5 Answers
    So, I just want to point something out here. Miley Cyrus, went as Lil Kim for Halloween.
    image

    And. Look. It's obvious she's Lil Kim, but she didn't make her skin darker for it. She just changed her hair and wore an iconic outfit. Miley "Twerking" Cryus has a less controversial costume then the most boring actress in Hollywood. 
    image



    Anniversary
    climbingwifeDreamergirl8812
  • chibiyui said:
    So, I just want to point something out here. Miley Cyrus, went as Lil Kim for Halloween.
    image

    And. Look. It's obvious she's Lil Kim, but she didn't make her skin darker for it. She just changed her hair and wore an iconic outfit. Miley "Twerking" Cryus has a less controversial costume then the most boring actress in Hollywood. 
    You're right. And to add to that, I was Minnie Mouse for Halloween and I didn't change the color of my skin either!
    image
  • chibiyuichibiyui The Boring Part of MD member
    5000 Comments 500 Love Its Fourth Anniversary 5 Answers
    ElcaB said:


    chibiyui said:

    So, I just want to point something out here. Miley Cyrus, went as Lil Kim for Halloween.
    image

    And. Look. It's obvious she's Lil Kim, but she didn't make her skin darker for it. She just changed her hair and wore an iconic outfit. Miley "Twerking" Cryus has a less controversial costume then the most boring actress in Hollywood. 

    You're right. And to add to that, I was Minnie Mouse for Halloween and I didn't change the color of my skin either!


    I was Daria Morgendorffer and didn't lighten my skin.
    image



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  • maryemoomaryemoo Fort Wayne, Indiana member
    100 Comments 25 Love Its First Anniversary Name Dropper
    chibiyui said:
    I think this is a really interesting (and charged!) topic. I think when it comes to race and costumes, there's a line that should be drawn, and blackface is on one side of that line due to its history, but where other choices fall is a bit fuzzier to me. Is it OK for me to put on white makeup to dress as a geisha and dye my hair black, or to put on fake freckles or a sombrero and poncho? I don't have a good answer, really. None of the above really seem all that bad to me, but then I'm white, so yeah. As for the whole sexy thing, that doesn't bother me, though I don't do it myself! I definitely don't like sexy kids' costumes though...
    No, dressing as a geisha or "mexican" is still pretty offensive. That is someones culture your using as a costume. You can dress up as a character, like Mulan, you could even dye your hair, but any kind of make up to make yourself look Asain is not cool. You could Dress up as Frida Kahlo, and use make up to give your self a unibrow, but darkening your skin would not be cool.

    Do you (or does anyone else) feel this strongly about dressing as a native American man/woman for Halloween? Because I have a close friend who is Native America and is in fact very offended by it, whether they're using skin darkening makeup or not.
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