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My whole life/marriage is a lie

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Re: My whole life/marriage is a lie

  • SP29SP29 member
    Sixth Anniversary 2500 Comments 500 Love Its 5 Answers
    SP29 said:
    Everyone who seems to like 'po boys' and this restaurant just needs to come to Canada :) we can eat poutine and beavertails for dessert ;)
    What are beavertails (unless you're talking about actual tails from beavers)?


    You can get alligator here...and the meat usually comes from the tail.  But not a dessert, lol.

    Yes, please enlighten us @MissKittyDanger!  I almost googled it.  But I'm at work and was concerned about what might inadvertently come up.

    Bahaha!

    Beavertails are a deep fried dough, usually designed for dessert. The basic is to sprinkle cinnamon or icing sugar on them, but you can go crazy and get fruit, ice cream, chocolate sauce, etc. Very commonly found at festivals, carnivals and amusement parks.

    Beavertails actually come from the Hungarian culture, where eaten for dessert include icing sugar or cinnamon, but you can also get them rubbed with olive oil and garlic.

    Beavertails can also be called Elephant Ears (same product, different shape).

    Oh, and they are the best.
    Growing up across the border (just outside of Niagara Falls) I thought poutine and beavertails were American.

    I also thought that you could choose to describe temperature as Celsius or Fahrenheit. I'm ashamed that it took me a long time to understand the difference. To be fair our news always reported both.  Also, my Sesame Street counted in French and English. Turns out that isn't the case in most of the U.S.
    You should claim dual citizenship then ;).

    I believe Canada changed to using the metric system sometime when my dad was in grade school, so he easily goes between both. My grandparents will still talk in imperial. I know the "easy" way to figuring out Farenheit (mostly so when it's winter, I can bitch about how warm it is in Arizona).

    I do need to say, there is a difference between poutine and Poutine- it's got to be done right! Cheese curds (some places use shredded cheese) and a thin gravy (usually chicken).
    charlotte989875MissKittyDanger
  • WinstonsGirlWinstonsGirl The Cold North member
    Knottie Warrior 2500 Comments 500 Love Its 5 Answers
    SP29 said:
    SP29 said:
    Everyone who seems to like 'po boys' and this restaurant just needs to come to Canada :) we can eat poutine and beavertails for dessert ;)
    What are beavertails (unless you're talking about actual tails from beavers)?


    You can get alligator here...and the meat usually comes from the tail.  But not a dessert, lol.

    Yes, please enlighten us @MissKittyDanger!  I almost googled it.  But I'm at work and was concerned about what might inadvertently come up.

    Bahaha!

    Beavertails are a deep fried dough, usually designed for dessert. The basic is to sprinkle cinnamon or icing sugar on them, but you can go crazy and get fruit, ice cream, chocolate sauce, etc. Very commonly found at festivals, carnivals and amusement parks.

    Beavertails actually come from the Hungarian culture, where eaten for dessert include icing sugar or cinnamon, but you can also get them rubbed with olive oil and garlic.

    Beavertails can also be called Elephant Ears (same product, different shape).

    Oh, and they are the best.
    Growing up across the border (just outside of Niagara Falls) I thought poutine and beavertails were American.

    I also thought that you could choose to describe temperature as Celsius or Fahrenheit. I'm ashamed that it took me a long time to understand the difference. To be fair our news always reported both.  Also, my Sesame Street counted in French and English. Turns out that isn't the case in most of the U.S.
    You should claim dual citizenship then ;).

    I believe Canada changed to using the metric system sometime when my dad was in grade school, so he easily goes between both. My grandparents will still talk in imperial. I know the "easy" way to figuring out Farenheit (mostly so when it's winter, I can bitch about how warm it is in Arizona).

    I do need to say, there is a difference between poutine and Poutine- it's got to be done right! Cheese curds (some places use shredded cheese) and a thin gravy (usually chicken).
    And I grew up fully in the Canadian (metric?, I don't even know) system, yet always use feet/inches for height (but meters/km for distance), pounds for size.  I couldn't tell you my height/weight in meters and kgs, and a house in meters squared is foreign to me, cos I use square feet.  I feel like lots of us swing both ways up here.  :D
    Image and video hosting by TinyPic
    charlotte989875SP29MissKittyDangershort+sassy
  • SP29 said:
    SP29 said:
    Everyone who seems to like 'po boys' and this restaurant just needs to come to Canada :) we can eat poutine and beavertails for dessert ;)
    What are beavertails (unless you're talking about actual tails from beavers)?


    You can get alligator here...and the meat usually comes from the tail.  But not a dessert, lol.

    Yes, please enlighten us @MissKittyDanger!  I almost googled it.  But I'm at work and was concerned about what might inadvertently come up.

    Bahaha!

    Beavertails are a deep fried dough, usually designed for dessert. The basic is to sprinkle cinnamon or icing sugar on them, but you can go crazy and get fruit, ice cream, chocolate sauce, etc. Very commonly found at festivals, carnivals and amusement parks.

    Beavertails actually come from the Hungarian culture, where eaten for dessert include icing sugar or cinnamon, but you can also get them rubbed with olive oil and garlic.

    Beavertails can also be called Elephant Ears (same product, different shape).

    Oh, and they are the best.
    Growing up across the border (just outside of Niagara Falls) I thought poutine and beavertails were American.

    I also thought that you could choose to describe temperature as Celsius or Fahrenheit. I'm ashamed that it took me a long time to understand the difference. To be fair our news always reported both.  Also, my Sesame Street counted in French and English. Turns out that isn't the case in most of the U.S.
    You should claim dual citizenship then ;).

    I believe Canada changed to using the metric system sometime when my dad was in grade school, so he easily goes between both. My grandparents will still talk in imperial. I know the "easy" way to figuring out Farenheit (mostly so when it's winter, I can bitch about how warm it is in Arizona).

    I do need to say, there is a difference between poutine and Poutine- it's got to be done right! Cheese curds (some places use shredded cheese) and a thin gravy (usually chicken).
    I didn't even know there was another way to do it! Why would you use anything but curds?! Blasphemy.
    SP29MissKittyDanger
  • CharmedPamCharmedPam Chicagoburbs member
    2500 Comments 500 Love Its Fourth Anniversary First Answer
    When I make it at home, I only use curds.  Otherwise it would be fries with gravy and cheese, right?

    SP29
  • spockforprezspockforprez Virginia member
    500 Love Its 1000 Comments Third Anniversary Name Dropper
    I'm going to eat the shit out of an elephant ear tomorrow.
    why wait? go now!


    They have an elephant ear stand at Soldier Field and I'm going there tomorrow.

    IDK where to just buy one outside of a county fair. And I'm too fat to allow myself to start making them at home again, LOL.

    That's me and milkshakes. I remember a particularly shameful time when I figured out I could make milkshakes in our Magic Bullet/Ninja thing. I bought Bluebell Dutch Chocolate (the best chocolate ice cream in existence) and stood at the counter making the milkshakes and drinking them straight from the blender. I can't remember if it was 2 or 3 of them but it was both magnificent and horrifying, lol. 
    Daisypath Anniversary tickers
  • I'm going to eat the shit out of an elephant ear tomorrow.
    why wait? go now!


    They have an elephant ear stand at Soldier Field and I'm going there tomorrow.

    IDK where to just buy one outside of a county fair. And I'm too fat to allow myself to start making them at home again, LOL.

    That's me and milkshakes. I remember a particularly shameful time when I figured out I could make milkshakes in our Magic Bullet/Ninja thing. I bought Bluebell Dutch Chocolate (the best chocolate ice cream in existence) and stood at the counter making the milkshakes and drinking them straight from the blender. I can't remember if it was 2 or 3 of them but it was both magnificent and horrifying, lol. 
    Great, now I want a milkshake.
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    spockforprez
  • SP29SP29 member
    Sixth Anniversary 2500 Comments 500 Love Its 5 Answers
    SP29 said:
    SP29 said:
    Everyone who seems to like 'po boys' and this restaurant just needs to come to Canada :) we can eat poutine and beavertails for dessert ;)
    What are beavertails (unless you're talking about actual tails from beavers)?


    You can get alligator here...and the meat usually comes from the tail.  But not a dessert, lol.

    Yes, please enlighten us @MissKittyDanger!  I almost googled it.  But I'm at work and was concerned about what might inadvertently come up.

    Bahaha!

    Beavertails are a deep fried dough, usually designed for dessert. The basic is to sprinkle cinnamon or icing sugar on them, but you can go crazy and get fruit, ice cream, chocolate sauce, etc. Very commonly found at festivals, carnivals and amusement parks.

    Beavertails actually come from the Hungarian culture, where eaten for dessert include icing sugar or cinnamon, but you can also get them rubbed with olive oil and garlic.

    Beavertails can also be called Elephant Ears (same product, different shape).

    Oh, and they are the best.
    Growing up across the border (just outside of Niagara Falls) I thought poutine and beavertails were American.

    I also thought that you could choose to describe temperature as Celsius or Fahrenheit. I'm ashamed that it took me a long time to understand the difference. To be fair our news always reported both.  Also, my Sesame Street counted in French and English. Turns out that isn't the case in most of the U.S.
    You should claim dual citizenship then ;).

    I believe Canada changed to using the metric system sometime when my dad was in grade school, so he easily goes between both. My grandparents will still talk in imperial. I know the "easy" way to figuring out Farenheit (mostly so when it's winter, I can bitch about how warm it is in Arizona).

    I do need to say, there is a difference between poutine and Poutine- it's got to be done right! Cheese curds (some places use shredded cheese) and a thin gravy (usually chicken).
    And I grew up fully in the Canadian (metric?, I don't even know) system, yet always use feet/inches for height (but meters/km for distance), pounds for size.  I couldn't tell you my height/weight in meters and kgs, and a house in meters squared is foreign to me, cos I use square feet.  I feel like lots of us swing both ways up here.  :D
    Same!
  • SP29 said:
    SP29 said:
    Everyone who seems to like 'po boys' and this restaurant just needs to come to Canada :) we can eat poutine and beavertails for dessert ;)
    What are beavertails (unless you're talking about actual tails from beavers)?


    You can get alligator here...and the meat usually comes from the tail.  But not a dessert, lol.

    Yes, please enlighten us @MissKittyDanger!  I almost googled it.  But I'm at work and was concerned about what might inadvertently come up.

    Bahaha!

    Beavertails are a deep fried dough, usually designed for dessert. The basic is to sprinkle cinnamon or icing sugar on them, but you can go crazy and get fruit, ice cream, chocolate sauce, etc. Very commonly found at festivals, carnivals and amusement parks.

    Beavertails actually come from the Hungarian culture, where eaten for dessert include icing sugar or cinnamon, but you can also get them rubbed with olive oil and garlic.

    Beavertails can also be called Elephant Ears (same product, different shape).

    Oh, and they are the best.
    Growing up across the border (just outside of Niagara Falls) I thought poutine and beavertails were American.

    I also thought that you could choose to describe temperature as Celsius or Fahrenheit. I'm ashamed that it took me a long time to understand the difference. To be fair our news always reported both.  Also, my Sesame Street counted in French and English. Turns out that isn't the case in most of the U.S.
    You should claim dual citizenship then ;).

    I believe Canada changed to using the metric system sometime when my dad was in grade school, so he easily goes between both. My grandparents will still talk in imperial. I know the "easy" way to figuring out Farenheit (mostly so when it's winter, I can bitch about how warm it is in Arizona).

    I do need to say, there is a difference between poutine and Poutine- it's got to be done right! Cheese curds (some places use shredded cheese) and a thin gravy (usually chicken).
    I didn't even know there was another way to do it! Why would you use anything but curds?! Blasphemy.
    @charlotte989875  ilu :kissing_heart:
    charlotte989875SP29
  • I heard a comedian talking about one of his all-time favorite political events was when the U.S. announced in 1975 that they we were going to switch over to the Metric system.

    He joked, "There were no protests.  There were no marches on Washington.  The entire American people just looked up from their desks for a moment, thought about it, and said NAH."

    For anyone interested, here is a brief paragraph about the conversion that never happened.  I apologize for the weird formatting, I copied it:

    Congress passed the Metric

    Conversion Act of 1975 “to coordinate and plan

    the increasing use of the metric system in the United States.” The Act, however, did not require a tenyear conversion period. A process of voluntary conversion was initiated, and the U.S. Metric Board was established. The Board was charged with “devising and carrying out a broad program of planning, coordination, and public education, consistent with other national policy and interests, with the aim of implementing the policy set forth in this Act.” The efforts of the Metric Board were largely ignored by the American public, and, in 1981, the Board reported to Congress that it lacked the clear Congressional mandate necessary to bring about national conversion. Due to this apparent ineffectiveness, and in an effort to reduce Federal spending, the Metric Board was disestablished in 1982.


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    MissKittyDangerSP29LadyCatherineDB
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