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Unpopular Opinion Time?

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Re: Unpopular Opinion Time?

  • Our place is yellow. Bright when sun hits, but ugly as fuck. Apparently that's the former "house neutral"

    I like grey. To me grey is a neutral. We have a lot of black and grey furniture, and we're still doing grey tones through the place.

    Kitchen has grey tiles, so we're taking tone from lightest colour and doing that and the white from the same tone as rest of main floor.


    Yeeeaaahhh...I painted the other side of my duplex a bright, yellow color a few years ago with white trim.  I like it.  I think it looks cute in a historic home.  But I see now it was a misstep.  In showings, some potential tenants love it and gush about it, but I've also had some who were turned off by the brightness and yellowness of it.  With (I'm guessing) the majority falling somewhere in between.

    I attached a pic of the front room so you all can see what I am talking about, but in my usual klutzy "I can't figure out attaching pics to posts", the pic is up above the quote box.

    The yellow isn't bad per say .... I just despise yellow in general. I can't wear it and it's just not my colour. It looks great with what we have {dark floors, white trim and dark furniture}
    Ours isn't as bright as yours, but not far off when sun hits.
  • PrettyGirlLostPrettyGirlLost A Land Filled with Unicorns and Cat Hair member
    5000 Comments Fifth Anniversary 500 Love Its First Answer
    I can't stand the old series of Doctor Who. I find it poorly written, badly acted and offensively sexist.  Way beyond sexist, I can't  even forgive it for the time it was written in (like I can for a lot* of the original Star Trek series, it's sexist by today's standards but at least the women on the show were portrayed as intelligent and competent and important members of the crew). I only watch the Doctor Who reboot. 

    *ETA with the exception of the episode where the message was women can't be captains. For the record, Gene Roddenberry was no longer with the show when that happened and was digusted by that episode. 
    Interesting. My problem with the Doctor Who reboot is that the companions always seem to turn into love interests. The part of the old series that I liked was that there were usually multiple companions at a time, and none of them seemed romantically interested in the Doctor.
    My problem with the reboot are the fanboys and fangirls :-P

    The 4th Doctor is my Doctor :-)

    "Love is the one thing we're capable of perceiving that transcends time and space."


    LadyCatherineDB
  • PrettyGirlLostPrettyGirlLost A Land Filled with Unicorns and Cat Hair member
    5000 Comments Fifth Anniversary 500 Love Its First Answer
    ernursej said:
    I like wearing scrubs. I could go a whole week with wearing my scrubs to work and then coming home to put on my pjs and never wear other clothes. I know a lot of people think they look shapeless and dumpy but they are so comfortable!
    Comfort aside, this confuses me.  I thought scrubs were meant only to be worn in the hospital -- you put on clean scrubs when you get there and then change back into street clothes after you're done working.  So, assuming that people don't change from hospital to non-hospital scrubs [or do they?- I often see people wearing scrubs on the subway], isn't the reasoning behind hospital clothing that it's as sterile and clean as possible since you're in an as-sterile-as-possible environment?
    No. only people who change into non scrubs before or after work are either people that work in the OR or maybe L&D and Neonatal ICU. Or a germaphobe. Other than that, almost everyone else wears their scrubs to and from work. It's not about sterile environment. The only sterile place in the hospital is an operating room. It's about not getting blood, shit, mucous, pee, or any other bodily fluid on your regular clothes, and about being able to differentiate who is who in the hospital setting - nurse vs md vs technician vs transporter. 
    But when you get blood, shit, mucous, pee etc. on your scrubs at work, you shouldn't be running across the street to the Starbucks in your PPE, commuting on public transportation, etc, right?  You should change, even if you aren't working in an OR, ICU, etc.

    There's a reason why the clinical lab employees in the lab across from me aren't permitted to wear their gloves or lab coats in their break room where they eat, and why Infection Control gets on employees for wearing similar PPE into the hospital cafeteria upstairs.

    "Love is the one thing we're capable of perceiving that transcends time and space."


    lizybeff
  • cupcait927cupcait927 Western NY wine country member
    Sixth Anniversary 2500 Comments 500 Love Its First Answer


    And pfffffft to all the people who can't look past yellow (or any color!) paint.  Paint is the easiest, quickest, and cheapest thing to change about any house, and it wasn't what made the homes we passed on deal breakers.  Yeah, it sucks to paint an entire house single handedly, and I am not in a hurry to do it again, but it was worth it in our first home.
    I so agree with all of this. I have a friend looking to buy now and she keeps complaining about terrible colors. Please, my kitchen was deep red when we bought it. It was annoying, but it was the first thing to go. Sure, paining is annoying, but in the grand scheme of housing projects problem one of the easiest and cheapest to fix. 


    This is why I can't watch House Hunters anymore.

    All these dumbshit assholes who hate paint colors and get mad at their realtors for not pulling million dollar homes for their $200,000 budget out of their asses. "I don't like green so this bedroom won't work. And I really wanted a chef's kitchen and in-ground pool". STFU.

    H and I looked at 41 houses before we bought and the only paint colors I even noticed were the outdoor mural dealie on some kids' rooms. BFD. Hell, I don't think I even knew what color our house was until we'd lived there for like a week.

    I watched an episode of House Hunters yesterday for the first time in AGES and was immediately pissed off. The wife could not stop complaining about the paint colors (which, for the most part, were completely fine). 

    When H and I bought our house, every room was painted a different color. The kitchen was yellow, the living room was bright blue, their kid's bedroom is bright purple and the stairwell - lime green. Yes, it sucks to have to paint every room in a house (we still haven't done the stairwell because it will require hiring someone due to the ceiling height) but in the grand scheme of things, it's not that bad.
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    charlotte989875vikinganna87
  • lyndausvilyndausvi Western Slope, Colorado mod
    Moderator Knottie Warrior 10000 Comments 500 Love Its


    And pfffffft to all the people who can't look past yellow (or any color!) paint.  Paint is the easiest, quickest, and cheapest thing to change about any house, and it wasn't what made the homes we passed on deal breakers.  Yeah, it sucks to paint an entire house single handedly, and I am not in a hurry to do it again, but it was worth it in our first home.
    I so agree with all of this. I have a friend looking to buy now and she keeps complaining about terrible colors. Please, my kitchen was deep red when we bought it. It was annoying, but it was the first thing to go. Sure, paining is annoying, but in the grand scheme of housing projects problem one of the easiest and cheapest to fix. 


    This is why I can't watch House Hunters anymore.

    All these dumbshit assholes who hate paint colors and get mad at their realtors for not pulling million dollar homes for their $200,000 budget out of their asses. "I don't like green so this bedroom won't work. And I really wanted a chef's kitchen and in-ground pool". STFU.

    H and I looked at 41 houses before we bought and the only paint colors I even noticed were the outdoor mural dealie on some kids' rooms. BFD. Hell, I don't think I even knew what color our house was until we'd lived there for like a week.

    I watched an episode of House Hunters yesterday for the first time in AGES and was immediately pissed off. The wife could not stop complaining about the paint colors (which, for the most part, were completely fine). 

    When H and I bought our house, every room was painted a different color. The kitchen was yellow, the living room was bright blue, their kid's bedroom is bright purple and the stairwell - lime green. Yes, it sucks to have to paint every room in a house (we still haven't done the stairwell because it will require hiring someone due to the ceiling height) but in the grand scheme of things, it's not that bad.
    Add me to the list of people who can't watch HH anymore.   It's mostly scripted anyway and the writers make the buyers sound like spoiled, entitled brats on the stupidest of things.   Especially the cheapest fix you can make, PAINT!


    (there was a former knottie who was on HH International and gave us a little 411 on the process)






    What differentiates an average host and a great host is anticipating unexpressed needs and wants of their guests.  Just because the want/need is not expressed, doesn't mean it wouldn't be appreciated. 
    vikinganna87short+sassycupcait927PrettyGirlLost
  • vikinganna87vikinganna87 Live Free or Die member
    Fifth Anniversary 250 Love Its 100 Comments First Answer
    lyndausvi said:


    And pfffffft to all the people who can't look past yellow (or any color!) paint.  Paint is the easiest, quickest, and cheapest thing to change about any house, and it wasn't what made the homes we passed on deal breakers.  Yeah, it sucks to paint an entire house single handedly, and I am not in a hurry to do it again, but it was worth it in our first home.
    I so agree with all of this. I have a friend looking to buy now and she keeps complaining about terrible colors. Please, my kitchen was deep red when we bought it. It was annoying, but it was the first thing to go. Sure, paining is annoying, but in the grand scheme of housing projects problem one of the easiest and cheapest to fix. 


    This is why I can't watch House Hunters anymore.

    All these dumbshit assholes who hate paint colors and get mad at their realtors for not pulling million dollar homes for their $200,000 budget out of their asses. "I don't like green so this bedroom won't work. And I really wanted a chef's kitchen and in-ground pool". STFU.

    H and I looked at 41 houses before we bought and the only paint colors I even noticed were the outdoor mural dealie on some kids' rooms. BFD. Hell, I don't think I even knew what color our house was until we'd lived there for like a week.

    I watched an episode of House Hunters yesterday for the first time in AGES and was immediately pissed off. The wife could not stop complaining about the paint colors (which, for the most part, were completely fine). 

    When H and I bought our house, every room was painted a different color. The kitchen was yellow, the living room was bright blue, their kid's bedroom is bright purple and the stairwell - lime green. Yes, it sucks to have to paint every room in a house (we still haven't done the stairwell because it will require hiring someone due to the ceiling height) but in the grand scheme of things, it's not that bad.
    Add me to the list of people who can't watch HH anymore.   It's mostly scripted anyway and the writers make the buyers sound like spoiled, entitled brats on the stupidest of things.   Especially the cheapest fix you can make, PAINT!


    (there was a former knottie who was on HH International and gave us a little 411 on the process)

    Agreed.  It's easy to get sucked in, though.  H probably gets annoyed if we watch it together because I just make catty comments on the relationships, like, oh what a diva, how long is this gonna last?, he's clearly cheating on her, etc. I rarely agree with their taste either.

    As for colors, right now we essentially have three variations in our house; kitchen is pale/standard yellow but not pastel, which works because it's relatively spacious and we have cabinets that are an antique blue color.  Then I go for bluish slate colors (bathrooms) and greenish blue colors.  I try to find ones that look "old" because our house is ancient --- shy away from pastels. So far they look good but we have a few more rooms to go.  My parents' house is all white and cream colored inside and I find it sterile so that probably explains the penchant for colors.  

    I would love to paint a room or bathroom "bordello red" but don't have the guts right now.  Don't think H would go for it either but it's such a warm color.
    lyndausvi
  • HH is completely fake anyway.  The buyers have already purchased the home before the show, so the other 2 properties are just "fillers" that the agent finds that are remotely close to their requirements and price point.  So that's why a lot of the "complaints" sound really stupid, because they basically have to make up reasons as to why they hate the house.  

    When I was a real estate agent one of my listings was used as a "no" house.  The agent called me 2 days before filming to ask if it could be used, it was a vacant new construction home so that was easy.  Also in Chicago, my boss was approached to act as some buyers' agent for HH, even though he was the listing agent on the house they bought, without an agent.  He said no.  
    Married 9.12.15
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  • CharmedPamCharmedPam Chicagoburbs member
    2500 Comments 500 Love Its Fourth Anniversary First Answer
    HH is completely fake anyway.  The buyers have already purchased the home before the show, so the other 2 properties are just "fillers" that the agent finds that are remotely close to their requirements and price point.  So that's why a lot of the "complaints" sound really stupid, because they basically have to make up reasons as to why they hate the house.  

    When I was a real estate agent one of my listings was used as a "no" house.  The agent called me 2 days before filming to ask if it could be used, it was a vacant new construction home so that was easy.  Also in Chicago, my boss was approached to act as some buyers' agent for HH, even though he was the listing agent on the house they bought, without an agent.  He said no.  
    This makes sense.  I'm like ALL the couples win the house?  All of them?  I lost 7 bids before I got my house!  Granted, my money was not even close to any budget these people have. 

    ei34
  • cupcait927cupcait927 Western NY wine country member
    Sixth Anniversary 2500 Comments 500 Love Its First Answer
    HH is completely fake anyway.  The buyers have already purchased the home before the show, so the other 2 properties are just "fillers" that the agent finds that are remotely close to their requirements and price point.  So that's why a lot of the "complaints" sound really stupid, because they basically have to make up reasons as to why they hate the house.  

    When I was a real estate agent one of my listings was used as a "no" house.  The agent called me 2 days before filming to ask if it could be used, it was a vacant new construction home so that was easy.  Also in Chicago, my boss was approached to act as some buyers' agent for HH, even though he was the listing agent on the house they bought, without an agent.  He said no.  
    Yup, we found that out when the agent we used to buy our house was on HH. Still though, I'd find better fake things to complain about than paint color if I was on there.
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  • I had a buyer once that would complain about every paint color in every house she saw.  I finally just stopped showing her "used" properties, and we only looked at new.  Then she decided not to buy anything at all and continued to rent her shithole apartment.
    Married 9.12.15
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    vikinganna87
  • cupcait927cupcait927 Western NY wine country member
    Sixth Anniversary 2500 Comments 500 Love Its First Answer
    I had a buyer once that would complain about every paint color in every house she saw.  I finally just stopped showing her "used" properties, and we only looked at new.  Then she decided not to buy anything at all and continued to rent her shithole apartment.
    What a gigantic waste of your time!
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  • vikinganna87vikinganna87 Live Free or Die member
    Fifth Anniversary 250 Love Its 100 Comments First Answer
    @short+sassy  LOVE your house and especially that color :)

    short+sassy
  • I had a buyer once that would complain about every paint color in every house she saw.  I finally just stopped showing her "used" properties, and we only looked at new.  Then she decided not to buy anything at all and continued to rent her shithole apartment.
    What a gigantic waste of your time!
    A lot of people wasted my time, which is why I'm not a real estate agent anymore.  The best was some buyers in Chicago, in the million dollar range, that schlepped me around to 92 different houses over the span of a year or so (I'm not even exaggerating, I kept a spreadsheet), and then went and bought their friend's house, without me or any agent at all.  And it wasn't even that nice, compared to some of the houses I showed them.
    Married 9.12.15
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  • lovesclimbinglovesclimbing Alaska member
    Sixth Anniversary 2500 Comments 500 Love Its First Answer
    Here's an unpopular opinion that is probably really unpopular. 

    I hate siggies with anything more than one to two sentences in them. Hate them. Some sites have restrictions that only allow still pictures and limit the size, which is a restriction I wish all forums had. I get annoyed with huge siggies and gifs. I've seen siggies that take up half the screen on a phone! 

    (This is not aimed at any particular poster. I have signatures disabled, so I haven't seen any on TK in four to five years and have no idea what anyone has anymore.) 

    madamerwinKatCtoKatA
  • I had a buyer once that would complain about every paint color in every house she saw.  I finally just stopped showing her "used" properties, and we only looked at new.  Then she decided not to buy anything at all and continued to rent her shithole apartment.


    I had a former coworker whose H was a bit of an extreme person.  Very fastidious.  Very germophobic.  Nice guy, but just bothered by a lot of things.

    When they were ready to buy a house, he refused to look at anything but new construction.  Because it creeped him out to buy a house that other people had lived in.  Obviously, in apartment living, he'd lived in "other people's" places.  It still creeped him out, but he just lived with it because he had to.  But for a place he was buying, he had to be the first owner.

    Wedding Countdown Ticker
    Knottie1452098987
  • ernursej said:
    I like wearing scrubs. I could go a whole week with wearing my scrubs to work and then coming home to put on my pjs and never wear other clothes. I know a lot of people think they look shapeless and dumpy but they are so comfortable!
    Comfort aside, this confuses me.  I thought scrubs were meant only to be worn in the hospital -- you put on clean scrubs when you get there and then change back into street clothes after you're done working.  So, assuming that people don't change from hospital to non-hospital scrubs [or do they?- I often see people wearing scrubs on the subway], isn't the reasoning behind hospital clothing that it's as sterile and clean as possible since you're in an as-sterile-as-possible environment?
    No. only people who change into non scrubs before or after work are either people that work in the OR or maybe L&D and Neonatal ICU. Or a germaphobe. Other than that, almost everyone else wears their scrubs to and from work. It's not about sterile environment. The only sterile place in the hospital is an operating room. It's about not getting blood, shit, mucous, pee, or any other bodily fluid on your regular clothes, and about being able to differentiate who is who in the hospital setting - nurse vs md vs technician vs transporter. 
    But when you get blood, shit, mucous, pee etc. on your scrubs at work, you shouldn't be running across the street to the Starbucks in your PPE, commuting on public transportation, etc, right?  You should change, even if you aren't working in an OR, ICU, etc.

    There's a reason why the clinical lab employees in the lab across from me aren't permitted to wear their gloves or lab coats in their break room where they eat, and why Infection Control gets on employees for wearing similar PPE into the hospital cafeteria upstairs.

    In my hospital, unless you work OR, NICU or L+D, you have to provide your own scrubs and everyone commutes to and from in their scrubs. I always have an extra pair for those times that I end up with bodily fluids on me. I will never errand run wearing scrubs that have been worn to provide patient care but I'm not wasting time to change in and out of street clothes at work when I'm just going between work and home.

    I'm not always providing patient care so those days that I'm not, I have no problems running errands in those scrubs. It is no different than someone running errands in their work clothes.

  • ernursej said:
    ernursej said:
    I like wearing scrubs. I could go a whole week with wearing my scrubs to work and then coming home to put on my pjs and never wear other clothes. I know a lot of people think they look shapeless and dumpy but they are so comfortable!
    Comfort aside, this confuses me.  I thought scrubs were meant only to be worn in the hospital -- you put on clean scrubs when you get there and then change back into street clothes after you're done working.  So, assuming that people don't change from hospital to non-hospital scrubs [or do they?- I often see people wearing scrubs on the subway], isn't the reasoning behind hospital clothing that it's as sterile and clean as possible since you're in an as-sterile-as-possible environment?
    No. only people who change into non scrubs before or after work are either people that work in the OR or maybe L&D and Neonatal ICU. Or a germaphobe. Other than that, almost everyone else wears their scrubs to and from work. It's not about sterile environment. The only sterile place in the hospital is an operating room. It's about not getting blood, shit, mucous, pee, or any other bodily fluid on your regular clothes, and about being able to differentiate who is who in the hospital setting - nurse vs md vs technician vs transporter. 
    But when you get blood, shit, mucous, pee etc. on your scrubs at work, you shouldn't be running across the street to the Starbucks in your PPE, commuting on public transportation, etc, right?  You should change, even if you aren't working in an OR, ICU, etc.

    There's a reason why the clinical lab employees in the lab across from me aren't permitted to wear their gloves or lab coats in their break room where they eat, and why Infection Control gets on employees for wearing similar PPE into the hospital cafeteria upstairs.

    In my hospital, unless you work OR, NICU or L+D, you have to provide your own scrubs and everyone commutes to and from in their scrubs. I always have an extra pair for those times that I end up with bodily fluids on me. I will never errand run wearing scrubs that have been worn to provide patient care but I'm not wasting time to change in and out of street clothes at work when I'm just going between work and home.

    I'm not always providing patient care so those days that I'm not, I have no problems running errands in those scrubs. It is no different than someone running errands in their work clothes.

    Yep, my H is a dental student in a hospital (not the same as a doctor but definitely still bodily fluids involved, haha) and wearing scrubs out and about is definitely the norm. They usually wear gowns over their scrubs when with a patient anyway.
  • ernursej said:
    ernursej said:
    I like wearing scrubs. I could go a whole week with wearing my scrubs to work and then coming home to put on my pjs and never wear other clothes. I know a lot of people think they look shapeless and dumpy but they are so comfortable!
    Comfort aside, this confuses me.  I thought scrubs were meant only to be worn in the hospital -- you put on clean scrubs when you get there and then change back into street clothes after you're done working.  So, assuming that people don't change from hospital to non-hospital scrubs [or do they?- I often see people wearing scrubs on the subway], isn't the reasoning behind hospital clothing that it's as sterile and clean as possible since you're in an as-sterile-as-possible environment?
    No. only people who change into non scrubs before or after work are either people that work in the OR or maybe L&D and Neonatal ICU. Or a germaphobe. Other than that, almost everyone else wears their scrubs to and from work. It's not about sterile environment. The only sterile place in the hospital is an operating room. It's about not getting blood, shit, mucous, pee, or any other bodily fluid on your regular clothes, and about being able to differentiate who is who in the hospital setting - nurse vs md vs technician vs transporter. 
    But when you get blood, shit, mucous, pee etc. on your scrubs at work, you shouldn't be running across the street to the Starbucks in your PPE, commuting on public transportation, etc, right?  You should change, even if you aren't working in an OR, ICU, etc.

    There's a reason why the clinical lab employees in the lab across from me aren't permitted to wear their gloves or lab coats in their break room where they eat, and why Infection Control gets on employees for wearing similar PPE into the hospital cafeteria upstairs.

    In my hospital, unless you work OR, NICU or L+D, you have to provide your own scrubs and everyone commutes to and from in their scrubs. I always have an extra pair for those times that I end up with bodily fluids on me. I will never errand run wearing scrubs that have been worn to provide patient care but I'm not wasting time to change in and out of street clothes at work when I'm just going between work and home.

    I'm not always providing patient care so those days that I'm not, I have no problems running errands in those scrubs. It is no different than someone running errands in their work clothes.

    This. Most people will either have an extra pair of scuba or will borrow some from the OR scrub machine if they were to get gross shit on them. Obvs most people will not go Or and about the rest of the day with blood or poop in their clothes...
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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  • PrettyGirlLostPrettyGirlLost A Land Filled with Unicorns and Cat Hair member
    5000 Comments Fifth Anniversary 500 Love Its First Answer
    ernursej said:
    ernursej said:
    I like wearing scrubs. I could go a whole week with wearing my scrubs to work and then coming home to put on my pjs and never wear other clothes. I know a lot of people think they look shapeless and dumpy but they are so comfortable!
    Comfort aside, this confuses me.  I thought scrubs were meant only to be worn in the hospital -- you put on clean scrubs when you get there and then change back into street clothes after you're done working.  So, assuming that people don't change from hospital to non-hospital scrubs [or do they?- I often see people wearing scrubs on the subway], isn't the reasoning behind hospital clothing that it's as sterile and clean as possible since you're in an as-sterile-as-possible environment?
    No. only people who change into non scrubs before or after work are either people that work in the OR or maybe L&D and Neonatal ICU. Or a germaphobe. Other than that, almost everyone else wears their scrubs to and from work. It's not about sterile environment. The only sterile place in the hospital is an operating room. It's about not getting blood, shit, mucous, pee, or any other bodily fluid on your regular clothes, and about being able to differentiate who is who in the hospital setting - nurse vs md vs technician vs transporter. 
    But when you get blood, shit, mucous, pee etc. on your scrubs at work, you shouldn't be running across the street to the Starbucks in your PPE, commuting on public transportation, etc, right?  You should change, even if you aren't working in an OR, ICU, etc.

    There's a reason why the clinical lab employees in the lab across from me aren't permitted to wear their gloves or lab coats in their break room where they eat, and why Infection Control gets on employees for wearing similar PPE into the hospital cafeteria upstairs.

    In my hospital, unless you work OR, NICU or L+D, you have to provide your own scrubs and everyone commutes to and from in their scrubs. I always have an extra pair for those times that I end up with bodily fluids on me. I will never errand run wearing scrubs that have been worn to provide patient care but I'm not wasting time to change in and out of street clothes at work when I'm just going between work and home.

    I'm not always providing patient care so those days that I'm not, I have no problems running errands in those scrubs. It is no different than someone running errands in their work clothes.

    This. Most people will either have an extra pair of scuba or will borrow some from the OR scrub machine if they were to get gross shit on them. Obvs most people will not go Or and about the rest of the day with blood or poop in their clothes...
    And yet you'd be surprised.

    We live in a world where we have an Infection Control department that is tasked with doing rounds and yelling at doctors and nurses to wash their hands before and after each patient contact- which is something that they should already be freaking doing- and where hospital staff that are involved in direct patient contact are walking into the hospital cafeteria with their paper gowns and other PPE still on, so I don't really have a lot of faith that the guy in scrubs on my bus ride home doesn't have fluids on him.

    YOU two might have the common sense to change, but I dunno about everyone else.




    "Love is the one thing we're capable of perceiving that transcends time and space."


    lizybeff
  • levioosalevioosa Southern California member
    5000 Comments Fifth Anniversary 500 Love Its 5 Answers
    ernursej said:
    ernursej said:
    I like wearing scrubs. I could go a whole week with wearing my scrubs to work and then coming home to put on my pjs and never wear other clothes. I know a lot of people think they look shapeless and dumpy but they are so comfortable!
    Comfort aside, this confuses me.  I thought scrubs were meant only to be worn in the hospital -- you put on clean scrubs when you get there and then change back into street clothes after you're done working.  So, assuming that people don't change from hospital to non-hospital scrubs [or do they?- I often see people wearing scrubs on the subway], isn't the reasoning behind hospital clothing that it's as sterile and clean as possible since you're in an as-sterile-as-possible environment?
    No. only people who change into non scrubs before or after work are either people that work in the OR or maybe L&D and Neonatal ICU. Or a germaphobe. Other than that, almost everyone else wears their scrubs to and from work. It's not about sterile environment. The only sterile place in the hospital is an operating room. It's about not getting blood, shit, mucous, pee, or any other bodily fluid on your regular clothes, and about being able to differentiate who is who in the hospital setting - nurse vs md vs technician vs transporter. 
    But when you get blood, shit, mucous, pee etc. on your scrubs at work, you shouldn't be running across the street to the Starbucks in your PPE, commuting on public transportation, etc, right?  You should change, even if you aren't working in an OR, ICU, etc.

    There's a reason why the clinical lab employees in the lab across from me aren't permitted to wear their gloves or lab coats in their break room where they eat, and why Infection Control gets on employees for wearing similar PPE into the hospital cafeteria upstairs.

    In my hospital, unless you work OR, NICU or L+D, you have to provide your own scrubs and everyone commutes to and from in their scrubs. I always have an extra pair for those times that I end up with bodily fluids on me. I will never errand run wearing scrubs that have been worn to provide patient care but I'm not wasting time to change in and out of street clothes at work when I'm just going between work and home.

    I'm not always providing patient care so those days that I'm not, I have no problems running errands in those scrubs. It is no different than someone running errands in their work clothes.

    This. Most people will either have an extra pair of scuba or will borrow some from the OR scrub machine if they were to get gross shit on them. Obvs most people will not go Or and about the rest of the day with blood or poop in their clothes...
    And yet you'd be surprised.

    We live in a world where we have an Infection Control department that is tasked with doing rounds and yelling at doctors and nurses to wash their hands before and after each patient contact- which is something that they should already be freaking doing- and where hospital staff that are involved in direct patient contact are walking into the hospital cafeteria with their paper gowns and other PPE still on, so I don't really have a lot of faith that the guy in scrubs on my bus ride home doesn't have fluids on him.

    YOU two might have the common sense to change, but I dunno about everyone else.



    I worked on a floor where hand washing compliance was 40%.  FORTY FUCKING PERCENT.  Same hospital also couldn't decide what they wanted their policy to be for wearing OR/L&D scrubs in the cafeteria area.  So I'd wear the current policy down to the cafeteria, and then get yelled at for not updating it.  This was an every other week thing.  It was so frustrating.  


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