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Random: Private Swim Lessons cost

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Re: Random: Private Swim Lessons cost

  • It's funny how differently people relate to something as common as swim lessons.  I have to say that in my own life experience, getting private lessons would be hella ritzy and very much outside the normal experience.  (Not judging--people can spent money on ritzy things if they so desire!)  We were neither rich nor poor when I was growing up, and my friends had a pretty wide span of parental earnings, and I never once heard of anyone getting private lessons.  It just wasn't a thing.

    And if you didn't go through all 6 classes over the course of three or more years (Beginner 1 & 2, Intermediate 1 & 2, and Advanced 1 & 2) you had "dropped out" of swim lessons.  You had to successfully complete the whole program to be allowed on the diving board, for example.  (I totally dropped out after Beginner 2.  I don't really like swimming all that much anyway.)  Lifeguard class was after the Advanced level, and I think that lasted a couple of years on top of the standard classes.
  • climbingwifeclimbingwife NYC 'burbs member
    10000 Comments Sixth Anniversary 500 Love Its 5 Answers
    It's funny how differently people relate to something as common as swim lessons.  I have to say that in my own life experience, getting private lessons would be hella ritzy and very much outside the normal experience.  (Not judging--people can spent money on ritzy things if they so desire!)  We were neither rich nor poor when I was growing up, and my friends had a pretty wide span of parental earnings, and I never once heard of anyone getting private lessons.  It just wasn't a thing.

    And if you didn't go through all 6 classes over the course of three or more years (Beginner 1 & 2, Intermediate 1 & 2, and Advanced 1 & 2) you had "dropped out" of swim lessons.  You had to successfully complete the whole program to be allowed on the diving board, for example.  (I totally dropped out after Beginner 2.  I don't really like swimming all that much anyway.)  Lifeguard class was after the Advanced level, and I think that lasted a couple of years on top of the standard classes.
    Was this some kind of swim program? Whose diving board were you not allowed to go on? 

    I can only think of one person I knew growing up that belonged to a swim program. We didn't have swim teams in my school district. Competitive swimming is not really a thing here, I guess. Most swimming was done for fun at private houses or town pools. 

  • It's funny how differently people relate to something as common as swim lessons.  I have to say that in my own life experience, getting private lessons would be hella ritzy and very much outside the normal experience.  (Not judging--people can spent money on ritzy things if they so desire!)  We were neither rich nor poor when I was growing up, and my friends had a pretty wide span of parental earnings, and I never once heard of anyone getting private lessons.  It just wasn't a thing.

    And if you didn't go through all 6 classes over the course of three or more years (Beginner 1 & 2, Intermediate 1 & 2, and Advanced 1 & 2) you had "dropped out" of swim lessons.  You had to successfully complete the whole program to be allowed on the diving board, for example.  (I totally dropped out after Beginner 2.  I don't really like swimming all that much anyway.)  Lifeguard class was after the Advanced level, and I think that lasted a couple of years on top of the standard classes.
    We have rec centres and outdoor pools everywhere in our city. Our rec programs are heavily subsidised and relatively cheap. We also had free swim hours during the summer and during heat alerts all the pools are open and free. It's worth it for all kids to learn how to swim. Most of our schools do have swim teams but that's because a lot of the schools are attached to rec centres and they serve double duty. 
  • HeffalumpHeffalump member
    Knottie Warrior 5000 Comments 500 Love Its First Answer
    edited December 2016
    It's funny how differently people relate to something as common as swim lessons.  I have to say that in my own life experience, getting private lessons would be hella ritzy and very much outside the normal experience.  (Not judging--people can spent money on ritzy things if they so desire!)  We were neither rich nor poor when I was growing up, and my friends had a pretty wide span of parental earnings, and I never once heard of anyone getting private lessons.  It just wasn't a thing.

    And if you didn't go through all 6 classes over the course of three or more years (Beginner 1 & 2, Intermediate 1 & 2, and Advanced 1 & 2) you had "dropped out" of swim lessons.  You had to successfully complete the whole program to be allowed on the diving board, for example.  (I totally dropped out after Beginner 2.  I don't really like swimming all that much anyway.)  Lifeguard class was after the Advanced level, and I think that lasted a couple of years on top of the standard classes.

    Wooz takes private lessons simply because the classes for her age group meet twice weekly, and it was becoming a grind with her other activities.  (She only had one free night during the school week, and she's only 7.  It wasn't ideal.)  We could move her to Saturdays if we put her in private lessons, so we did.  NBD.
  • We did private lessons because our parents didn't want us to socialize, they wanted us to learn to swim!
    ei34lnixon8
  • It's funny how differently people relate to something as common as swim lessons.  I have to say that in my own life experience, getting private lessons would be hella ritzy and very much outside the normal experience.  (Not judging--people can spent money on ritzy things if they so desire!)  We were neither rich nor poor when I was growing up, and my friends had a pretty wide span of parental earnings, and I never once heard of anyone getting private lessons.  It just wasn't a thing.

    And if you didn't go through all 6 classes over the course of three or more years (Beginner 1 & 2, Intermediate 1 & 2, and Advanced 1 & 2) you had "dropped out" of swim lessons.  You had to successfully complete the whole program to be allowed on the diving board, for example.  (I totally dropped out after Beginner 2.  I don't really like swimming all that much anyway.)  Lifeguard class was after the Advanced level, and I think that lasted a couple of years on top of the standard classes.
    Was this some kind of swim program? Whose diving board were you not allowed to go on? 

    I can only think of one person I knew growing up that belonged to a swim program. We didn't have swim teams in my school district. Competitive swimming is not really a thing here, I guess. Most swimming was done for fun at private houses or town pools. 
    Not a specific swim program, just the regular public pools.  You would take lessons at your local pool and once you "graduated" you  got full use.  It's been ages so I can't remember exactly how it went, but I feel like when you completed the beginner level you were allowed in the deep end, intermediate got you the short diving board, and when you finished the advanced classes you could use the tall diving board.
    STARMOON44
  • It's funny how differently people relate to something as common as swim lessons.  I have to say that in my own life experience, getting private lessons would be hella ritzy and very much outside the normal experience.  (Not judging--people can spent money on ritzy things if they so desire!)  We were neither rich nor poor when I was growing up, and my friends had a pretty wide span of parental earnings, and I never once heard of anyone getting private lessons.  It just wasn't a thing.

    And if you didn't go through all 6 classes over the course of three or more years (Beginner 1 & 2, Intermediate 1 & 2, and Advanced 1 & 2) you had "dropped out" of swim lessons.  You had to successfully complete the whole program to be allowed on the diving board, for example.  (I totally dropped out after Beginner 2.  I don't really like swimming all that much anyway.)  Lifeguard class was after the Advanced level, and I think that lasted a couple of years on top of the standard classes.
    Was this some kind of swim program? Whose diving board were you not allowed to go on? 

    I can only think of one person I knew growing up that belonged to a swim program. We didn't have swim teams in my school district. Competitive swimming is not really a thing here, I guess. Most swimming was done for fun at private houses or town pools. 
    Not a specific swim program, just the regular public pools.  You would take lessons at your local pool and once you "graduated" you  got full use.  It's been ages so I can't remember exactly how it went, but I feel like when you completed the beginner level you were allowed in the deep end, intermediate got you the short diving board, and when you finished the advanced classes you could use the tall diving board.
    Our public pool required that you pass a different test to use the deep end, lap pool, and diving pool sections. 
  • The swim lessons I took were part of a program. You started in the toddler program (required a parent to be in the pool with the child) all the way up to lifeguard training, if you completed everything.

    But there weren't any rules about how much you had to complete. And there aren't any rules in our public rec pools about swimming levels (because that would mean they'd have to card every person coming in on a free swim, and not everyone takes lessons in the city)- it's all based on parental supervision.

    I had friends who took the levels all the way through to lifeguard, and some of them worked as life guards in public pools over the summers (pretty sweet job actually), but myself I only took the first 3 levels. I learned to swim enough to do a few strokes, swim the deep end and jump off the diving board (for fun, and the basic dive). My brothers did not take swim lessons, and we had pools growing up, they were taught by our parents/family.

    I've never heard of kids taking private swim lessons, but it makes sense if there are two of them, they are young, and the parents want it for safety. When I think back to the toddler classes offered in our city programs, they are pretty basic. You stay in the shallow end, most of the time on a raised platform, and it's mostly about getting comfortable in the water, playing games and learning to float. I was probably 5 or 6 years old when I started the "level" program.
  • climbingwifeclimbingwife NYC 'burbs member
    10000 Comments Sixth Anniversary 500 Love Its 5 Answers
    It's funny how differently people relate to something as common as swim lessons.  I have to say that in my own life experience, getting private lessons would be hella ritzy and very much outside the normal experience.  (Not judging--people can spent money on ritzy things if they so desire!)  We were neither rich nor poor when I was growing up, and my friends had a pretty wide span of parental earnings, and I never once heard of anyone getting private lessons.  It just wasn't a thing.

    And if you didn't go through all 6 classes over the course of three or more years (Beginner 1 & 2, Intermediate 1 & 2, and Advanced 1 & 2) you had "dropped out" of swim lessons.  You had to successfully complete the whole program to be allowed on the diving board, for example.  (I totally dropped out after Beginner 2.  I don't really like swimming all that much anyway.)  Lifeguard class was after the Advanced level, and I think that lasted a couple of years on top of the standard classes.
    Was this some kind of swim program? Whose diving board were you not allowed to go on? 

    I can only think of one person I knew growing up that belonged to a swim program. We didn't have swim teams in my school district. Competitive swimming is not really a thing here, I guess. Most swimming was done for fun at private houses or town pools. 
    Not a specific swim program, just the regular public pools.  You would take lessons at your local pool and once you "graduated" you  got full use.  It's been ages so I can't remember exactly how it went, but I feel like when you completed the beginner level you were allowed in the deep end, intermediate got you the short diving board, and when you finished the advanced classes you could use the tall diving board.
    That's interesting. The only time I remember having to take any sort of "test" for a pool was at my friend's condo. You had to be able to tread water for a certain amount of time in the deep end, and that was it. I don't remember our town pool having any sort of rules like this. Even for the diving boards - I believe you just had to be a certain height. 

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