Wedding Woes

Daycare Teacher Gifts

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Re: Daycare Teacher Gifts

  • So, with "storebought only" daycares I assumed that was for snacks for the class.  Do you think it also means you can't make a homemade treat for the teachers to take home?  At Halloween my mom made chocolate bark for DS's 3 teachers.  It was wrapped and it a bag with a little Happy Halloween tag, clearly not for consumption in class by the group.  Nobody said anything to me.

    For Christmas I got preschool themed Lularoe leggings for each of the teachers.  I have seen them all wearing that type of patterned legging at the daycare before.  I found one a clouds and airplanes theme, one a handprint theme, and the third are blocks and stuffed animals.  I know that when I wear my patterned leggings at home, my son gets a kick out of them (birds and cars).  If they don't want to wear them to work. . . . . . PJs maybe.

  • kaos16 said:

    So, with "storebought only" daycares I assumed that was for snacks for the class.  Do you think it also means you can't make a homemade treat for the teachers to take home?  At Halloween my mom made chocolate bark for DS's 3 teachers.  It was wrapped and it a bag with a little Happy Halloween tag, clearly not for consumption in class by the group.  Nobody said anything to me.

    For Christmas I got preschool themed Lularoe leggings for each of the teachers.  I have seen them all wearing that type of patterned legging at the daycare before.  I found one a clouds and airplanes theme, one a handprint theme, and the third are blocks and stuffed animals.  I know that when I wear my patterned leggings at home, my son gets a kick out of them (birds and cars).  If they don't want to wear them to work. . . . . . PJs maybe.

    I don't think so. At our daycare, you can still pack a lunch for your kid (that's not store bought), so I can't see why you couldn't bring in other homemade stuff for other people. 
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  • holyguacamole79holyguacamole79 a taco truck in Houston member
    5000 Comments Fifth Anniversary 500 Love Its 5 Answers
    Another teacher vote for gift cards.  Our school actually has a "gift card fund" if parents wish to donate.  They made a gift card "tree" for the teachers and we each got to take one (I think they were $10 each?)  They ranged from Amazon to Starbucks.  We only have ~40 teachers and it's a private school.  As soon as we got the email that the "tree" was assembled and ready for us, there was a mad dash to the break room to get the "good" gift cards.

    I think I got a few candles and a Christmas ornament last year.  I got several gift cards.  The thank you notes meant a LOT to me, though, especially as a first-year teacher.  

    I did have one parent bring me a "teacher survival kit" during parent-teacher conferences.  It had a bottle of wine, chocolate, hand cream, and a bath bomb.  She said she saw how booked my conference schedule was and that her daughter was very appreciative of the extra help.  That mom wins!  :smiley:
    short+sassysparklepants41ILoveBeachMusic
  • Honestly I'd skip homemade for teachers too. I figure they are either getting a crap ton of stuff they can't eat before it goes bad, they have a dietary restriction, or the ick factor. With that many reasons I just skip. I do a few prepackaged singly wrapped biscotti with my gift cards. 
    STARMOON44
  • I'm not big on homemade/potlucks because of the ick factor. Our daycare was the same way in regards to nothing homemade due to allergy concerns. The elementary school has a new policy this year that for birthdays you can buy a snack from the cafeteria for the class, but you can't send anything in (even if store bought and healthy). 
  • Oh we are strongly discouraged from bringing food for a treat. Book or game for the classroom or goody bags to go home. 
  • banana468 said:
    banana468 said:
    banana468 said:
    FWIW, I've thought about making things / baked goods but I know of one daycare teacher who flat out refuses to eat homemade items simply because she doesn't know how clean people are in their kitchen.   
    I'm torn between thinking "that's fair" and "that's harsh"
    Yeah....it's reality.   

    As it is now in Chiquita's class, there are no homemade snacks allowed for class parties.   Anything contributed needs to be store bought.  
    WHAT? So the school is essentially saying, "the possibility that someone maybe licked a finger in the middle of making without washing is worse for kids than the processed crap that's in store bought food and who cares if people don't want to  waste money on buying goods instead of cooking your own."

    Totally makes sense. 


    Yeah....That's NOT what they're saying but way to jump on that Jump To Conclusions mat. 

    In your home you simply cannot certify that your produced goods are gluten free, nut free, vegetarian, vegan, or whatever.

    Did I keep the cookie mix next to the peanuts in my cabinet?   Did they come out after I gave my kid peanut butter?  Was the baking pan previously used for a recipe that has gluten and now I'm attempting to make GF?  Is it possible that there was dairy in the food mix even though I only used oil and one egg to make the cupcakes?  When you bring in store bought food there has to be a list of ingredients and a mark of what potential allergens are contained. 

    You simply can't do that in your house and if you take the liability of feeding a group of kids at an age where there are far more allergies, you need to stop the flow of goods that may be possibly contaminated.   It's their way of safe guarding and I actually like it even though my kids haven't been diagnosed with any allergies.  
    All of this.  Schools aren’t saying they prefer “processed crap” as you called it @lovesclimbing as much as it’s just safer to have that label from the supermarket as a guarantee.  The average homecook can’t 100% guarantee that what they’ve prepared is nut-free, or gluten-free, or for people like me who live in diverse areas, that something is Kosher or Halal-friendly.  Older DD has children in her preschool class with religious restrictions that I can’t meet.  

    It’s a drag in a way- I’m a passionate homecook and I even get paid to cater parties from time to time.  The Minnie Mouse cupcakes I made DD for the birthday party we threw her at home were adorable and head and shoulders tastier than the cupcakes I picked up at Fairway for her classroom celebration.  Is that more important than the (health/religious) needs of the entire group being met?  Nope.
    STARMOON44short+sassyOliveOilsMom
  • eileenrob said:
    All of this.  Schools aren’t saying they prefer “processed crap” as you called it @lovesclimbing as much as it’s just safer to have that label from the supermarket as a guarantee.  The average homecook can’t 100% guarantee that what they’ve prepared is nut-free, or gluten-free, or for people like me who live in diverse areas, that something is Kosher or Halal-friendly.  Older DD has children in her preschool class with religious restrictions that I can’t meet.  

    It’s a drag in a way- I’m a passionate homecook and I even get paid to cater parties from time to time.  The Minnie Mouse cupcakes I made DD for the birthday party we threw her at home were adorable and head and shoulders tastier than the cupcakes I picked up at Fairway for her classroom celebration.  Is that more important than the (health/religious) needs of the entire group being met?  Nope.

    I would never have even thought of that!  That's a really good point, but would be regional.

    I do not live in a diverse city (sigh).  I'd never heard the term Halal until a few years ago.  I was in an unemployment stint, but working p/t as a personal assistant to a Muslim man.  He asked me to find a local source for Halal chickens.  I had to ask him what that was.  No dice on local Halal chickens either.

    But in the last couple years, the Halal Guys chain has opened 3 stores in my area.  Thanks NYC.

    There are a grand total of 2 Kosher delis and one Kosher restaurant in an area of about 1M people.  I'd gladly trade some oysters for good corned beef and pastrami, lol.

    Wedding Countdown Ticker
    ei34
  • banana468 said:
    banana468 said:
    banana468 said:
    FWIW, I've thought about making things / baked goods but I know of one daycare teacher who flat out refuses to eat homemade items simply because she doesn't know how clean people are in their kitchen.   
    I'm torn between thinking "that's fair" and "that's harsh"
    Yeah....it's reality.   

    As it is now in Chiquita's class, there are no homemade snacks allowed for class parties.   Anything contributed needs to be store bought.  
    WHAT? So the school is essentially saying, "the possibility that someone maybe licked a finger in the middle of making without washing is worse for kids than the processed crap that's in store bought food and who cares if people don't want to  waste money on buying goods instead of cooking your own."

    Totally makes sense. 


    Yeah....That's NOT what they're saying but way to jump on that Jump To Conclusions mat. 

    In your home you simply cannot certify that your produced goods are gluten free, nut free, vegetarian, vegan, or whatever.

    Did I keep the cookie mix next to the peanuts in my cabinet?   Did they come out after I gave my kid peanut butter?  Was the baking pan previously used for a recipe that has gluten and now I'm attempting to make GF?  Is it possible that there was dairy in the food mix even though I only used oil and one egg to make the cupcakes?  When you bring in store bought food there has to be a list of ingredients and a mark of what potential allergens are contained. 

    You simply can't do that in your house and if you take the liability of feeding a group of kids at an age where there are far more allergies, you need to stop the flow of goods that may be possibly contaminated.   It's their way of safe guarding and I actually like it even though my kids haven't been diagnosed with any allergies.  
    I didn't know we were talking about allergies. I thought we were talking about people just not liking homemade food. That makes a little more sense, but I still think it's out of line for the school to require it if it's something where the parents are expected to bring food. 

  • @holyguacamole79 great idea for the thank you note! I will write her two Infant 1 teachers a heartfelt note to accompany their gift cards. :)
  • banana468 said:
    banana468 said:
    banana468 said:
    FWIW, I've thought about making things / baked goods but I know of one daycare teacher who flat out refuses to eat homemade items simply because she doesn't know how clean people are in their kitchen.   
    I'm torn between thinking "that's fair" and "that's harsh"
    Yeah....it's reality.   

    As it is now in Chiquita's class, there are no homemade snacks allowed for class parties.   Anything contributed needs to be store bought.  
    WHAT? So the school is essentially saying, "the possibility that someone maybe licked a finger in the middle of making without washing is worse for kids than the processed crap that's in store bought food and who cares if people don't want to  waste money on buying goods instead of cooking your own."

    Totally makes sense. 


    Yeah....That's NOT what they're saying but way to jump on that Jump To Conclusions mat. 

    In your home you simply cannot certify that your produced goods are gluten free, nut free, vegetarian, vegan, or whatever.

    Did I keep the cookie mix next to the peanuts in my cabinet?   Did they come out after I gave my kid peanut butter?  Was the baking pan previously used for a recipe that has gluten and now I'm attempting to make GF?  Is it possible that there was dairy in the food mix even though I only used oil and one egg to make the cupcakes?  When you bring in store bought food there has to be a list of ingredients and a mark of what potential allergens are contained. 

    You simply can't do that in your house and if you take the liability of feeding a group of kids at an age where there are far more allergies, you need to stop the flow of goods that may be possibly contaminated.   It's their way of safe guarding and I actually like it even though my kids haven't been diagnosed with any allergies.  
    I didn't know we were talking about allergies. I thought we were talking about people just not liking homemade food. That makes a little more sense, but I still think it's out of line for the school to require it if it's something where the parents are expected to bring food. 
    For the elementary school there are a half dozen parties in the year.   They ask the parents to sign up at the beginning of the year to bring something to one party.   We often sign up for paper goods.    

    Any other day of the school year I send Chiquita with anything I feel like (within reason).  The only rule they have is that if there's an allergy in the class then the snack for your child has to be complaint with the allergy (such as no peanut butter crackers if there's a nut allergy).


    At the daycare when we're asked to contribute to the potluck, they don't care how the food is made/prepared.  It can be homemade or store bought. 
  • banana468 said:
    banana468 said:
    banana468 said:
    banana468 said:
    FWIW, I've thought about making things / baked goods but I know of one daycare teacher who flat out refuses to eat homemade items simply because she doesn't know how clean people are in their kitchen.   
    I'm torn between thinking "that's fair" and "that's harsh"
    Yeah....it's reality.   

    As it is now in Chiquita's class, there are no homemade snacks allowed for class parties.   Anything contributed needs to be store bought.  
    WHAT? So the school is essentially saying, "the possibility that someone maybe licked a finger in the middle of making without washing is worse for kids than the processed crap that's in store bought food and who cares if people don't want to  waste money on buying goods instead of cooking your own."

    Totally makes sense. 


    Yeah....That's NOT what they're saying but way to jump on that Jump To Conclusions mat. 

    In your home you simply cannot certify that your produced goods are gluten free, nut free, vegetarian, vegan, or whatever.

    Did I keep the cookie mix next to the peanuts in my cabinet?   Did they come out after I gave my kid peanut butter?  Was the baking pan previously used for a recipe that has gluten and now I'm attempting to make GF?  Is it possible that there was dairy in the food mix even though I only used oil and one egg to make the cupcakes?  When you bring in store bought food there has to be a list of ingredients and a mark of what potential allergens are contained. 

    You simply can't do that in your house and if you take the liability of feeding a group of kids at an age where there are far more allergies, you need to stop the flow of goods that may be possibly contaminated.   It's their way of safe guarding and I actually like it even though my kids haven't been diagnosed with any allergies.  
    I didn't know we were talking about allergies. I thought we were talking about people just not liking homemade food. That makes a little more sense, but I still think it's out of line for the school to require it if it's something where the parents are expected to bring food. 
    For the elementary school there are a half dozen parties in the year.   They ask the parents to sign up at the beginning of the year to bring something to one party.   We often sign up for paper goods.    

    Any other day of the school year I send Chiquita with anything I feel like (within reason).  The only rule they have is that if there's an allergy in the class then the snack for your child has to be complaint with the allergy (such as no peanut butter crackers if there's a nut allergy).


    At the daycare when we're asked to contribute to the potluck, they don't care how the food is made/prepared.  It can be homemade or store bought. 
    Lol, I think I'd do that too!

  • thisismynickname2thisismynickname2 City By The Lake member
    5000 Comments Sixth Anniversary 500 Love Its First Answer
    What is an appropriate amount for a daycare teacher gift? We've had our baby in the infant room since October and there's 3 main teachers and I think 2-3 floaters. We're in Chicago, if the COL affects your advice. 
    Would a $50 gift card to Starbucks (which is next door to the center) suffice for all of them to share, do you think?
    ________________________________


  • What is an appropriate amount for a daycare teacher gift? We've had our baby in the infant room since October and there's 3 main teachers and I think 2-3 floaters. We're in Chicago, if the COL affects your advice. 
    Would a $50 gift card to Starbucks (which is next door to the center) suffice for all of them to share, do you think?
    I wouldn't give them a gift card to share....that just seems like a disaster waiting to happen. Do what you can afford. Why not do a $10 gift card for each of them. Even if they get the specialty lattes, you'd still be treating them to at least 2 coffees.
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    image
    sparklepants41charlotte989875ILoveBeachMusicshort+sassy
  • thisismynickname2thisismynickname2 City By The Lake member
    5000 Comments Sixth Anniversary 500 Love Its First Answer
    What is an appropriate amount for a daycare teacher gift? We've had our baby in the infant room since October and there's 3 main teachers and I think 2-3 floaters. We're in Chicago, if the COL affects your advice. 
    Would a $50 gift card to Starbucks (which is next door to the center) suffice for all of them to share, do you think?
    I wouldn't give them a gift card to share....that just seems like a disaster waiting to happen. Do what you can afford. Why not do a $10 gift card for each of them. Even if they get the specialty lattes, you'd still be treating them to at least 2 coffees.
    Yup, I could do that. I didn't want to come across as cheap but we haven't been there long either so I'm just not sure. But $10 per could work for sure. Thanks! 
    ________________________________


    charlotte989875short+sassy
  • What we did for the daycare teachers...  Flowers (think single stem rose or simple $5 arrangement)  and $$ in an envelope (can get these from the florist/grocery store)...   Otherwise, we bought fruit boxes from our local FFA Chapter's Fruit Sale and they got those...

    Don't complicate it, cash in an envelope (if you want to do it fancy, Christmas Tree money origami is SUPER easy!) ALWAYS goes over great - even if you give the main teachers a $20 and the assistants a $10...
    Baby Birthday Ticker Ticker Baby Birthday Ticker Ticker
  • What is an appropriate amount for a daycare teacher gift? We've had our baby in the infant room since October and there's 3 main teachers and I think 2-3 floaters. We're in Chicago, if the COL affects your advice. 
    Would a $50 gift card to Starbucks (which is next door to the center) suffice for all of them to share, do you think?
    I'd separate it out to individual gift cards as PP mentioned. I'm doing $50 for his main one because he loves her and she's even babysat for us and then I think $25 for his other main teacher who hasn't been there long and something smaller for the floaters. 
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