Wedding Woes

Curiosity question

Pretend your 20 yo son pulls a muscle at work and is transported to the hospital.  You are the emergency contact.  The son has hemophilia and Aspergers so it could be a complication.  He did not lose consciousness, was not in immediate life-threatening danger, but he did not get a chance to take his cell phone with him.

Would you expect the employer to contact you?  What about the hospital?

That's about all the info I have. 


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Re: Curiosity question

  • 6fsn6fsn member
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    I'm kind of in the he's 20 and should be able to advocate for himself enough to make a phone call if he sees the warrant in it. 

    I could make a case that the employer should have called if he was taken in via ambulance.  The person just used the word "transport" so it could have been any vehicle.

    I transported and called the ambulance for several people when I worked at the papermill.  We only contacted someone if it was a loss of consciousness or the coherent person said to call someone.

    charlotte989875
  • I would expect the employer to contact the emergency contact, but not the hospital (unless the son specifically asked for his parent to be contacted). The hospital likely wouldn't due to HIPAA unless the son asked/authorized as he's an adult. I think the employer could/should given that the son had other medical conditions they presumably knew about. 

    Without any other information that would be my guess. 
    short+sassyOliveOilsMomahoywedding
  • climbingwifeclimbingwife NYC 'burbs member
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    I would not expect the employer. Maybe the hospital, but possibly only if the son had asked them to call. He is an adult, and it wasn't a life threatening situation. 

    charlotte989875ei34short+sassy
  • MRDCleMRDCle member
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    If someone is the "emergency contact," then what exactly constitutes an emergency?
    In my book, being taken to the hospital means there was an emergency. 
    A lot of times if someone is injured in a work place, even the most minor injuries involve a trip to the hospital for worker's comp purposes. A friend once fell off a chair, no injuries even, and had to get transported via ambulance to a hospital to be checked.  

    Personally, I think that either loss of consciousness or if the injured party is incoherent from the injury would constitute an emergency. 
    Ro041ahoywedding
  • MobKazMobKaz Chicago suburbs member
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    I'm thinking that since this was work related, the employer was more concerned about fulfilling any Workmen's Comp details first and foremost. 

    At his age, I would hope that he does know how to advocate for himself.  If there is any issue with that, then this is a good circumstance from which to draw insight.  Does he keep any type of medical alert information in his wallet and/or phone? (I realize he left his phone behind.)  Did he think to ask to call home?  Did he feel calm and collected enough to handle this situation alone?  What did he have to say once he was home?
  • nicolegs17nicolegs17 YoMamaHouse member
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    Depends on how bad the Aspergers is, but no, I wouldn't expect a call from work or the hospital independently.
    MesmrEwe
  • ei34ei34 member
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    If 20 was replaced with an age under 18 and/or the symptoms were life-threatening, then I’d expect a call from the employer and the hospital.  

    My H has to go to the hospital from time to time for something work-related (he’s a firefighter).  The rule of thumb is if youre able to call home yourself, you do.  Hearing from the house or hosp makes it seem a lot worse.
    short+sassycharlotte989875
  • In a perfect world, it would be nice if another employee could have asked the injured employee if that person would like them to contact XYZ.

    But I can also see the case for being careful in divulging sensitive medical information, even if it is related to an accident.

    I think I'd leave that up to the employee or hospital to notify an emergency contact.

    For a somewhat related story, growing up we had the same family GP.  He was mom's doctor, even before I was born.  My mom didn't take us to a "pediatrician" when we were sick, she took us to him.  Well-baby visits, shots, ear infections, chicken pox, the whole 9 yards.

    At the age of 20, when I started feeling really tired and had all kinds of other weird symptoms, my mom made an appointment for me to see him.  Though I went to the appointment by myself.  He diagnosed my Type I diabetes after the appointment and after "spinning my blood sample" (something like that).  But he didn't call and tell me that, lol.  He called my mom and told her and helped her schedule an emergency appointment the next morning with an endocrinologist.  Was that a major HIPAA violation?  I'm assuming it was, since I was over 18.  Did it totally make sense to me that he called my mom instead of me, like he'd always done for my whole life?  Yes, it did, lol.

    I'm sure he knew during the appointment that Type I Diabetes is what was going on and wanted to make sure with the blood sample.  Because when I learned what the symptoms were, after the fact.  Oh goodness!  You'd think I'd opened up a medical textbook and just read down the list for him.

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  • 6fsn6fsn member
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    I know he wears a medical ID stating his hemophilia.  The level of aspergers- he's worked public facing retail for 4+ years and not through any sort of placement agency. 

    We also went to the hospital/urgent care so could also get the drug screen.

  • ShesSoColdShesSoCold bend over and I'll show ya mod
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    edited June 2018

    Hmmm. I'm on the fence here. And I think the aspergers complicates it. I'm sorry if these aren't the correct words to use, but if it's minor and the employer doesn't necessarily know about it, as a legal adult who did not lose consciousness, I don't think it's wrong of the employer to not call. But if his apergers is more significant, I think the employer should have called.

    ETA - This post took me a while to word so I didn't see your info on his aspergers, 6. Sorry.

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    charlotte989875ei34
  • levioosalevioosa Southern California member
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    If the son was mentally able and aware (and not conserved) then I would not expect the employer to call. If he had lost consciousness I would expect the emergency contact to be made aware of the situation. 


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    charlotte989875short+sassy
  • edited June 2018
    When I was injured at work, transported by ambulance, and received stitches, my boss contacted my mom was contacted as she was my emergency contact. I was 21 or 22. A year or so later when I torqued my back lifting something at work, I was transported by a co-worker to the ER (for mostly workmens comp type reasons) my mom was not notified. In neither case did the hospital contact anyone, how would they know who your E- contact is, HIPAA aside.

    A pulled muscle is not an emergency imo, he wasn’t bleeding, probably just going to get a look over and sent home. Nothing to call mom about.

    edited for HIPAA not HIPPO
  • eileenrob said:


    My H has to go to the hospital from time to time for something work-related (he’s a firefighter).  The rule of thumb is if youre able to call home yourself, you do.  Hearing from the house or hosp makes it seem a lot worse.
    I want a follow-up answer to my post.

    I think it a lot depends on the position and the potential for injury. I work in offices (the majority of my time). Injuries, to anyone, is uncommon and not expected. So if I was taken to the hospital it's probably an emergency and I would hope someone would call my husband. I wouldn't expect the hospital to call unless I couldn't. 

    Now if the job is such that injuries are common or anticipated then maybe this does not constitute an emergency and a call isn't necessary. 
    thisismynickname2
  • Do you know if they asked if he wanted to call someone?  Maybe he said no?

    I think if he wasn't hired through an agency or some other support type group that keeps tabs on him (I see commercials for some place around here that provides job training and placement for mostly able-bodied adults with mental/cognitive disabilities and I think they like have 'group leader' type situation who basically supervises the people they place while they work) and is treated like any other employee, then I don't think anyone did anything wrong. 
    ShesSoColdei34charlotte989875ahoywedding
  • ShesSoColdShesSoCold bend over and I'll show ya mod
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    mrsconn23 said:
    Do you know if they asked if he wanted to call someone?  Maybe he said no?

    I think if he wasn't hired through an agency or some other support type group that keeps tabs on him (I see commercials for some place around here that provides job training and placement for mostly able-bodied adults with mental/cognitive disabilities and I think they like have 'group leader' type situation who basically supervises the people they place while they work) and is treated like any other employee, then I don't think anyone did anything wrong. 


    This exactly. Thank you for saying what I wanted to, better than I did.

    My dad's kind-of-girlfriend has an adult son with mental disabilities who works at Home Depot. They call her if he even walks across the street for lunch, which is a good thing because he gets very confused very suddenly sometimes.

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    mrsconn23
  • eileenrob said:


    My H has to go to the hospital from time to time for something work-related (he’s a firefighter).  The rule of thumb is if youre able to call home yourself, you do.  Hearing from the house or hosp makes it seem a lot worse.
    I want a follow-up answer to my post.

    I think it a lot depends on the position and the potential for injury. I work in offices (the majority of my time). Injuries, to anyone, is uncommon and not expected. So if I was taken to the hospital it's probably an emergency and I would hope someone would call my husband. I wouldn't expect the hospital to call unless I couldn't. 

    Now if the job is such that injuries are common or anticipated then maybe this does not constitute an emergency and a call isn't necessary. 
    This is just a hypothetical question and not suppose to be taken in any sort of way.

    If you twisted your ankle coming down the stairs and it was policy that all injuries bigger than a paper cut had to go through the ER, would you expect them to call your H? Not a co-worker or friend but HR or your boss?
  • ShesSoColdShesSoCold bend over and I'll show ya mod
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    This is just a hypothetical question and not suppose to be taken in any sort of way.

    If you twisted your ankle coming down the stairs and it was policy that all injuries bigger than a paper cut had to go through the ER, would you expect them to call your H? Not a co-worker or friend but HR or your boss?
    For me, in this instance, I'd expect HR or someone to ask me, "Would you like me to call your husband?". If it were a situation where I was unable to answer for any reason, yes, I'd expect them to call him.
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  • 6fsn said:

    That's exactly what I was getting at mrsconn.  He applied for and got this job and many previously on his own merit.  Most customers would probably never think there was anything different about him.

    My SIL is ranting on facebook that nobody called her and I'm sitting here thinking "why would they?"  Then I started to wonder if my reaction is because of my feelings for her. 

    She didn't say if they asked him and I wouldn't be surprised if they did and he said no.

    I thought that it was her.  ;)  Just one more thing that makes her ridiculous.  
    6fsn
  • 6fsn said:

    Pretend your 20 yo son pulls a muscle at work and is transported to the hospital.  You are the emergency contact.  The son has hemophilia and Aspergers so it could be a complication.  He did not lose consciousness, was not in immediate life-threatening danger, but he did not get a chance to take his cell phone with him.

    Would you expect the employer to contact you?  What about the hospital?

    That's about all the info I have. 


    Nope. For something serious where he was unconscious my employer would call your designated emergency contact, but a pulled muscle, alert and oriented, and an adult? Absolutely I would expect employer and hospital to respect his privacy and not call. If hemophilia is a concern that he might not be able to communicate that needs to be on a med alert bracelet. 
    ei34ahoywedding
  • ShesSoColdShesSoCold bend over and I'll show ya mod
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    6fsn said:

    That's exactly what I was getting at mrsconn.  He applied for and got this job and many previously on his own merit.  Most customers would probably never think there was anything different about him.

    My SIL is ranting on facebook that nobody called her and I'm sitting here thinking "why would they?"  Then I started to wonder if my reaction is because of my feelings for her. 

    She didn't say if they asked him and I wouldn't be surprised if they did and he said no.


    Yeah, I see no issue with that.

    I just remembered this - my dad works at an airport (mostly private and corporate planes). Several years ago, he passed out at work. They called an ambulance. The only reason anyone was notified is because his coworker is a good family friend and he called me. The airport did not, presumably because he'd only been out a couple seconds and was coherent.

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  • @ShesSoCold 100% agree, if you are unconscious or unable to answer they should contact your emergency contact. I am asking more about non- life threatening injuries. I am just curious about office life because I come from a background more like @eileenrob, no one calls unless you can’t.
    ei34
  • If we're talking about a grown adult who has advocated for himself previously then no.

    Is your nephew on FB?   Because you may want to tell SIL privately that she's doing neither him nor her any favors.   Ranting on FB about how her adult son's employer is handling something is saying way more negatively about her than it is about the employer.   
    charlotte989875levioosaei34ahoywedding
  • 6fsn6fsn member
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    banana468 said:
    If we're talking about a grown adult who has advocated for himself previously then no.

    Is your nephew on FB?   Because you may want to tell SIL privately that she's doing neither him nor her any favors.   Ranting on FB about how her adult son's employer is handling something is saying way more negatively about her than it is about the employer.   

    SIL didn't use the employer name. 
  • 6fsn said:
    banana468 said:
    If we're talking about a grown adult who has advocated for himself previously then no.

    Is your nephew on FB?   Because you may want to tell SIL privately that she's doing neither him nor her any favors.   Ranting on FB about how her adult son's employer is handling something is saying way more negatively about her than it is about the employer.   

    SIL didn't use the employer name. 
    That's fine and it's good.   But a 20 year old adult doesn't want to see his mom treating him like a child on social media either.   
    charlotte989875ei34ahoywedding
  • 6fsn said:

    That's exactly what I was getting at mrsconn.  He applied for and got this job and many previously on his own merit.  Most customers would probably never think there was anything different about him.

    My SIL is ranting on facebook that nobody called her and I'm sitting here thinking "why would they?"  Then I started to wonder if my reaction is because of my feelings for her. 

    She didn't say if they asked him and I wouldn't be surprised if they did and he said no.

    Thanks for some of the context.  While one could feel that perhaps the employer should have contacted her, I don't think this is a situation that is so outrageously obvious that it deserves a FB rant.
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  • eileenrob said:


    My H has to go to the hospital from time to time for something work-related (he’s a firefighter).  The rule of thumb is if youre able to call home yourself, you do.  Hearing from the house or hosp makes it seem a lot worse.
    I want a follow-up answer to my post.

    I think it a lot depends on the position and the potential for injury. I work in offices (the majority of my time). Injuries, to anyone, is uncommon and not expected. So if I was taken to the hospital it's probably an emergency and I would hope someone would call my husband. I wouldn't expect the hospital to call unless I couldn't. 

    Now if the job is such that injuries are common or anticipated then maybe this does not constitute an emergency and a call isn't necessary. 
    This is just a hypothetical question and not suppose to be taken in any sort of way.

    If you twisted your ankle coming down the stairs and it was policy that all injuries bigger than a paper cut had to go through the ER, would you expect them to call your H? Not a co-worker or friend but HR or your boss?
    I'd expect them to ask me if I wanted them to call someone. 

    But then again, I've worked in either small departments within large universities/organizations, or rather small organizations. We also don't have strict policies (at least that I know of) requiring ER visits. 

    So yeah, I do still think if I was hurt at work to the point of requiring a hospital visit directly from work, it's most likely an emergency, which is what the emergency contact is for.

    But also, falling down the stairs is not a worker's comp related injury and my employer likely wouldn't be responsible for it, and would leave it up to me to handle care. But again my work experience might be different than most. 
    missJeanLouise
  • Not quite the same thing, but some of you may remember my H went to the emergency room a couple months ago because he threw is arm out of socket.

    Fortunately, one of our good friends was with him when it happened.  He told that guy not to call me, because I was at work and he didn't want to worry me.  That he would call me later.

    Friend called me anyway, felt guilty, and told me not to tell H he'd called and not to call H myself.  But just wanted to let me know what was going on.

    I waited for H to call me, when he was ready.  He didn't until he was discharged and all the way back home.  His opening line was something like, "Friend probably already told you, but I threw my arm out again and had to go to the emergency room.  But I'm back home now and doing okay."

    We know our friends well, lol.

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  • MyNameIsNotMyNameIsNot Atlanta member
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    eileenrob said:


    My H has to go to the hospital from time to time for something work-related (he’s a firefighter).  The rule of thumb is if youre able to call home yourself, you do.  Hearing from the house or hosp makes it seem a lot worse.
    I want a follow-up answer to my post.

    I think it a lot depends on the position and the potential for injury. I work in offices (the majority of my time). Injuries, to anyone, is uncommon and not expected. So if I was taken to the hospital it's probably an emergency and I would hope someone would call my husband. I wouldn't expect the hospital to call unless I couldn't. 

    Now if the job is such that injuries are common or anticipated then maybe this does not constitute an emergency and a call isn't necessary. 
    This is just a hypothetical question and not suppose to be taken in any sort of way.

    If you twisted your ankle coming down the stairs and it was policy that all injuries bigger than a paper cut had to go through the ER, would you expect them to call your H? Not a co-worker or friend but HR or your boss?
    I'd expect them to ask me if I wanted them to call someone. 

    But then again, I've worked in either small departments within large universities/organizations, or rather small organizations. We also don't have strict policies (at least that I know of) requiring ER visits. 

    So yeah, I do still think if I was hurt at work to the point of requiring a hospital visit directly from work, it's most likely an emergency, which is what the emergency contact is for.

    But also, falling down the stairs is not a worker's comp related injury and my employer likely wouldn't be responsible for it, and would leave it up to me to handle care. But again my work experience might be different than most. 
    Weirdly, it actually would be. It doesn't matter if the injury is specifically related to your job duties. I spilled hot coffee on myself at work last year, and I had to go through the whole deal of filing a report and refusing medical treatment so that it would be documented, should I bring a WC claim later. I work in an office, and was drinking the coffee I'd bought on the way in. The only reason anyone knew about it was because my manager was standing next to me at the time. Most embarrassing work related injury ever.

    I later found out that she was so diligent about enforcing the policy because another employee filed a WC claim for something with her knee after she fell off her chair. 
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