Wedding Invitations & Paper

Invitation Help: Mr. & Dr.

Hello all.. 

I am not exactly sure how to word my invitation, I am a doctor while my FI is not. I have looked up the etiquette on google, they recommend:
Dr. Bridesname and Mr. Groomsname, or Dr. and Mr. Groomsname, or Mr. and Dr. Groomsname. None of them seem to sound right to me.
Thanks for the help :)

Re: Invitation Help: Mr. & Dr.

  • AddieCakeAddieCake Beyond the Wall member
    10000 Comments 500 Love Its Fourth Anniversary 25 Answers
    I don't think I've ever seen the bride and groom's titles on an invitation. If you don't like the way it's suggested that you've turned up in your search, could you just put your names w/o titles? 


    What did you think would happen if you walked up to a group of internet strangers and told them to get shoehorned by their lady doc?~StageManager14
    image
  • photokittyphotokitty where I want to be mod
    Moderator Knottie Warrior 5000 Comments 500 Love Its
    There's not a clear cut rule on this one - shows how slow things are to catch up (i.e. it's no longer uncommon for a woman to be a doctor)

    If you want to use your title you can, but it is not necessary. You should spell out the entire word doctor if it fits. Technically women are suggested to use there social title - so you would just put your first and middle name if your parents' names are listed above and you share the same last name.

    My mother is a medical doctor, but my father is not. How is that worded?
    Traditionally, your mother would use her social title — “Mrs.” — on your wedding invitations, so your parents’ names should read “Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Jay Forrester.”

    My fiancé is a doctor. Does his title appear on our invitations?
    Medical doctors properly use their professional titles on wedding invitations, whereas Ph.D.’s do not. Medical degrees, such as M.D. or D.D.S., are never mentioned. They are professional designations that don’t belong on a social invitation. Their use should be reserved for business cards and professional letterheads.

    The groom always uses his full name, preceded by his title. There are no abbreviations, except for “Mr.” All other titles, such as “Doctor” and “The Reverend”, should be written out, although “Doctor” may be abbreviated when used with a long name. If “Doctor” is used more than once on an invitation, its use should be consistent. If it’s necessary to abbreviate it with one of the names, it should be abbreviated with all names.
    :kiss: ~xoxo~ :kiss:

  • Who is hosting your wedding?  If you are hosting it yourselves, it would be this:

    The pleasure of your company is requested
    at the marriage of
    Doctor Jane Bride
    and
    Mr. John Groom

    Titles are not usually used, but you can if you wish.  "Doctor" must be spelled out in full.  If your parents are hosting, then you do not use your title.
    httpiimgurcomTCCjW0wjpg
    doeydo
  • I'm not using Dr, just my first, middle, and last name on the invites.
  • huskypuppy14huskypuppy14 Boston Suburbs member
    2500 Comments Fifth Anniversary 500 Love Its First Answer
    There's not a clear cut rule on this one - shows how slow things are to catch up (i.e. it's no longer uncommon for a woman to be a doctor)

    If you want to use your title you can, but it is not necessary. You should spell out the entire word doctor if it fits. Technically women are suggested to use there social title - so you would just put your first and middle name if your parents' names are listed above and you share the same last name.

    My mother is a medical doctor, but my father is not. How is that worded?
    Traditionally, your mother would use her social title — “Mrs.” — on your wedding invitations, so your parents’ names should read “Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Jay Forrester.”

    My fiancé is a doctor. Does his title appear on our invitations?
    Medical doctors properly use their professional titles on wedding invitations, whereas Ph.D.’s do not. Medical degrees, such as M.D. or D.D.S., are never mentioned. They are professional designations that don’t belong on a social invitation. Their use should be reserved for business cards and professional letterheads.

    The groom always uses his full name, preceded by his title. There are no abbreviations, except for “Mr.” All other titles, such as “Doctor” and “The Reverend”, should be written out, although “Doctor” may be abbreviated when used with a long name. If “Doctor” is used more than once on an invitation, its use should be consistent. If it’s necessary to abbreviate it with one of the names, it should be abbreviated with all names.
    The bolded really bothers me, and if I were a Dr. or my mother were, I would not follow it- I dont' care what the "proper" etiquette is. I think it's insulting that the woman shouldn't use her title where the man (dad or FI) should. I'm all for following etiquette, but this type of stuff is way too old school for me to get behind.
    image
    image

    image


This discussion has been closed.
Choose Another Board
Search Boards