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No oreos for this kid..

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Re: No oreos for this kid..

  • FiancBFiancB MinnesOOOta member
    500 Love Its 1000 Comments Second Anniversary Name Dropper
    ^ Seriously. I went to Catholic school and we didn't have these silly ass rules. 

    The Newman's Own knockoffs of oreos are awesome. I haven't had them in forever though so I'm not sure how they compare to Double Stuf. Maybe there's Double-Stuf Newman-O's by now. 
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  • Oh FFS. Let me get this straight, so the school doesn't provide the kiddos with lunch but they expect parents to pack and then they get to criticize? Fuck that noise hard.

    Unless the school is providing a nutritional meal alternative they need to butt the hell out of the kids lunchbox. I get allergies and whatnot but the four Oreo cookies aren't going to kill her, or her classmates. I'm glad to know that the budget is going to pre-school lunch box TSA screeners, because heaven forbid a kid brings fruit snacks to school. Can't you see their efforts to keep the cafeteria lunchable free is a noble cause deserving of a participation ribbon?!

    In all seriousness, if sneaking junk food is this districts worst problem, they have it pretty good.
  • What the ever loving fuck. School lunches consist of deep fried processed carbs with something that might have once been meat And they get uppity about oreos?

  • KatieinBklnKatieinBkln (NO SLEEP TIL) Brooklyn! member
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    edited May 2015
    I really hope the pendulum swings somewhere back to reasonable by the time I have kids.

    No homemade treats allowed because of allergies? My god, how is it that we didn't have dozens of tiny bodies in anaphylaxis riddling the hallways back when I was a kid in the 90s?

    Back then, kids with allergies knew to ask whether food had their allergen in it. The teachers knew who the allergic kids were and looked out for them of they were too young to look out for themselves.

    Everything has to be gluten free? Fuck that. If a kid has Celiac, then the class party will not be the first or last time they will be excluded by food. It sucks, but there it is. If kids do NOT have Celiac, then their parents need to shut the fuck up.

    Policing every nutrient on a child's plate is pure insanity. By focusing so much on nutrients, we lose the perspective of The Meal, but worse, we limit variety in our diets--and eating a variety of foods is both delicious and healthy. A kid who was been gluten free since birth will of course get sick if he eats a cupcake, just like longtime vegetarians can no longer tolerate burgers (just a parallel to illustrate the ways our bodies adapt; if people want to be vegetarians that's cool. I just don't support schools forcing kids to eat a certain way). Why wouldn't we want to expose our kids to the richness and variety of life? Teaching them to be adventurous and fearless about food may teach them to be adventurous and fearless about life, and isn't that the point?

    Oh right, apparently the point these days is locking your child in a metaphorical safe so they never have to feel pain, experience struggle, exist outside of their comfort zone, or do anything hard that isn't a standardized test.
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  • adk19 said:

    jdluvr06 said:

    This whole thing is just stupid. Let the kid have the damn oreos.
    This might be an UO but honestly, I think schools are starting to go overboard on the restrictions. Not just with food but with everything. I mean there are schools that have rules about hair length. It is getting out of hand.

    Seriously!  I need to never have kids.  Or if I do, I need to homeschool them.  Friend has an 8th grader who died her hair blue last summer.  Had to change it back for school because it's distracting.  A facebook friend posted an article about how a girl got sent home from school for wearing capri leggings with a long skirt that went down to mid-thigh (so no view of a tight ass or camel toe) because her outfit was potentially distracting to the boys at the school.  Just read an article where the principal of a school shamed a father for taking his kids out of school for 3 days to travel to Boston to watch dad run the marathon and also do some education Boston things with them.  Apparently potatoes are not a grain so any lunch containing them needs to contain an ADDITIONAL starch which is oh so healthy.  Kids don't get taught sex ed or accurate science because of religious idiots on school boards.  And I think the amount of homework kids get nowadays is fucking ridiculous!  They should be PLAYING not doing pages upon pages of math problems after school!  Yeah, confirms that I'll just continue my plan to be the "Cool Aunt" and never have kids of my own.
    FWIW, based on what I read regarding the dad who took his kids out of school, the dad is making a mountain out of a molehill and the school system had to send the form letter that they did.
  • AprilH81AprilH81 Columbus, OH member
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    tcnoble said:

    mj8215 said:

    great, and now I've picked up a sixpack of oreos at my cafeteria and just ate all of them by myself. 

    Right? This just makes me want double stuf oreos like nobody's business.
    Double stuf is the only way to do it.

    Have you tried the birthday cake oreos? I was not impressed.
    The chocolate birthday cake oreos are "meh" but the vanilla birthday cake oreos are like manna from heaven.  DH and I can demolish a package in one night.  #noshame
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  • sarahuflsarahufl New York member
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    banana468 said:

    jdluvr06 said:

    This whole thing is just stupid. Let the kid have the damn oreos.
    This might be an UO but honestly, I think schools are starting to go overboard on the restrictions. Not just with food but with everything. I mean there are schools that have rules about hair length. It is getting out of hand.

    Seriously!  I need to never have kids.  Or if I do, I need to homeschool them.  Friend has an 8th grader who died her hair blue last summer.  Had to change it back for school because it's distracting.  A facebook friend posted an article about how a girl got sent home from school for wearing capri leggings with a long skirt that went down to mid-thigh (so no view of a tight ass or camel toe) because her outfit was potentially distracting to the boys at the school.  Just read an article where the principal of a school shamed a father for taking his kids out of school for 3 days to travel to Boston to watch dad run the marathon and also do some education Boston things with them.  Apparently potatoes are not a grain so any lunch containing them needs to contain an ADDITIONAL starch which is oh so healthy.  Kids don't get taught sex ed or accurate science because of religious idiots on school boards.  And I think the amount of homework kids get nowadays is fucking ridiculous!  They should be PLAYING not doing pages upon pages of math problems after school!  Yeah, confirms that I'll just continue my plan to be the "Cool Aunt" and never have kids of my own.
    FWIW, based on what I read regarding the dad who took his kids out of school, the dad is making a mountain out of a molehill and the school system had to send the form letter that they did.
    banana468 said:

    *BOXES* Yep, this. He violated a school policy and acted like a douche about it.

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  • So I TOTALLY agree that the school had absolutely no right to but in about the Oreos, but (possibly UO here) does anyone else thing four Oreos is a bit excessive for a an elementary school aged child?  Certainly not excessive enough to warrant any action, but... TBH if she's probably getting as many calories from those four cookies as she is from the entire rest of her lunch (sandwich and cheese stick), which personally seems extremely unbalanced to me.  Plus the fact that she's 5... I know everyone's appetite varies but I don't think I could have eaten four Oreos at age 5 even if someone let me, which my parents never would have anyway.  

    Also on the subject of schools over-policing food- does anyone else get the sense that it's really only elementary schools that come up with these extreme policies, and then by the time the kids get to high school they are basically free to buy themselves slices of Pizza Hut pizza every day with no one batting an eye?  Dictating to this degree what kids can eat is certainly NOT helping them learn to make good choices when they are making them for themselves... 
  • @themosthappy91 my first reaction was that 4 oreos for an every day lunch for a preschooler (think the article said she is just 4), was a bit much, but I also don't think this mom was sending them daily (and obvious not the point in this situation). And in another article it mentioned they asked her to bring in candy for an Easter party, so that is inconsistent messaging for sure.

    My son's day care (which does go up to preschool) has regulations by the Dept of Job and Family services on both provided and packed lunches, but they're pretty flexible in actually enforcing.

    Toddler appetites can be pretty big..my almost 3 year old can put down some serious food. Yesterday we went to a birthday party... He had grilled chicken, a bunch of fruit, cheese, some raw veggies, some tortilla chips, and then went on to eat an Oreo and most of a cupcake. He tried to grab more sweets on the way out, but I cut him off to avoid a mess in the car. He said he was still hungry in the car so I let him have fruit snacks (gasp!) from his treat bag from the party. At home an hour later he wanted popcorn (he likes to watch me do it on the stovetop), and he slammed a bunch of that too.

    Kids at that age are generally very active as well. And even at my son's age, he pretty much knows when he is full and stops eating.
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  • KahlylaKahlyla Moncton, NB member
    Knottie Warrior 500 Love Its 100 Comments Name Dropper
    edited May 2015
    adk19 said:

    jdluvr06 said:

    This whole thing is just stupid. Let the kid have the damn oreos.
    This might be an UO but honestly, I think schools are starting to go overboard on the restrictions. Not just with food but with everything. I mean there are schools that have rules about hair length. It is getting out of hand.

    Seriously!  I need to never have kids.  Or if I do, I need to homeschool them.  Friend has an 8th grader who died her hair blue last summer.  Had to change it back for school because it's distracting.  A facebook friend posted an article about how a girl got sent home from school for wearing capri leggings with a long skirt that went down to mid-thigh (so no view of a tight ass or camel toe) because her outfit was potentially distracting to the boys at the school.  Just read an article where the principal of a school shamed a father for taking his kids out of school for 3 days to travel to Boston to watch dad run the marathon and also do some education Boston things with them.  Apparently potatoes are not a grain so any lunch containing them needs to contain an ADDITIONAL starch which is oh so healthy.  Kids don't get taught sex ed or accurate science because of religious idiots on school boards.  And I think the amount of homework kids get nowadays is fucking ridiculous!  They should be PLAYING not doing pages upon pages of math problems after school!  Yeah, confirms that I'll just continue my plan to be the "Cool Aunt" and never have kids of my own.
    I don't know - all I can say is that my kid's school is nothing like this; it's basically just as it was when I went to elementary school back in the day only with the added restriction of being peanut-free (they're different schools in different provinces). I'm in Canada, but I have to believe that not every school in the U.S. has become this crazy either. Hopefully these ones continue to make the news because they're the exception, not the rule, but who knows?

    Here they don't police the lunches whatsoever, dress code seems to be the same kind of guidelines we always technically had but never worried about. They have 'crazy hair' days and pyjama days and such so I don't think they're too concerned about those aspects. I'm involved in some councils and committees so I see the back end a bit and engage directly with the principal, and I'm confident that they seem to be placing far more concern and resources on curriculum, preventing bullying and creating safe spaces, community engagement, and physical and mental health initiatives, which is as it should be, imo.
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  • edited June 2015
  • PrettyGirlLostPrettyGirlLost A Land Filled with Unicorns and Cat Hair member
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    And if the child isn't a diabetic, 4 oreos is in no way excessive for an elementary school aged child with respect to calories or sugar intact. . .which is ultimately converted to calories.

    Typically active kids consume and burn more than the recommended 2K calorie diet for adults. They are growing, they need more calories. 4 oreos is nothing if the rest of her diet and activity levels are healthy.

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  • ashley8918ashley8918 Chicago Suburbs member
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    littlepep said:

    And if the child isn't a diabetic, 4 oreos is in no way excessive for an elementary school aged child with respect to calories or sugar intact. . .which is ultimately converted to calories.

    Typically active kids consume and burn more than the recommended 2K calorie diet for adults. They are growing, they need more calories. 4 oreos is nothing if the rest of her diet and activity levels are healthy.

    Yeah, I don't get the "4 Oreos is excessive for a 5-year-old". Really? My just-turned-5-year-old could put away an entire pack of Oreos if I let her. Kid eats like a linebacker and is bordering on underweight.
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  • I guess growing up for me two cookies was the normal dessert serving size so four seemed like a lot.  I asked my husband and he said two cookies was also the standard for his house.  But I just looked up the nutrition facts for Oreos and it turns out they are less calories/sugar than I would have guessed.  Just out of curiosity, what was the norm for y'all?
  • PrettyGirlLostPrettyGirlLost A Land Filled with Unicorns and Cat Hair member
    5000 Comments Fifth Anniversary 500 Love Its First Answer
    edited May 2015
    Whatever we wanted. We rarely ever gorged on junk or dessert foods. . . Which is why we weren't given limits. We ate as much at dinner as we wanted until we were full, and we didn't have enforced limits on dessert.

    We were also super active as kids. What was limited was sedentary, TV/console game/computer time, not food.

    I was skin and bones until after college. Aging and stress screws your metabolism!

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  • hellosweetie1015hellosweetie1015 Where the skies are so blue member
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    I guess growing up for me two cookies was the normal dessert serving size so four seemed like a lot.  I asked my husband and he said two cookies was also the standard for his house.  But I just looked up the nutrition facts for Oreos and it turns out they are less calories/sugar than I would have guessed.  Just out of curiosity, what was the norm for y'all?

    I ate three. Unless they were white chocolate covered Christmas Oreos. Then they had to be put up away from me or I'd eat the whole sleeve of sixteen.
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  • theartistformerlyknownastheartistformerlyknownas peaced out. member
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    I didn't read most of this thread but just reading the word "Oreos" on the main page every day grew unbearable. Bought some tonight, and they shall be dinner.

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    luckya23PrettyGirlLostashley8918VulgarGirl
  • I didn't read most of this thread but just reading the word "Oreos" on the main page every day grew unbearable. Bought some tonight, and they shall be dinner.



    I've had 3 of the single serving packs in the last week.

    I can't be trusted with a full size box :-(

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  • sarahuflsarahufl New York member
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    luckya23 said:

    I didn't read most of this thread but just reading the word "Oreos" on the main page every day grew unbearable. Bought some tonight, and they shall be dinner.



    I've had 3 of the single serving packs in the last week.

    I can't be trusted with a full size box :-(

    THE SNACK MACHINE IN MY OFFICE IS STILL OUT OF THEM.

    I may have to go out of the office today.
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  • I guess growing up for me two cookies was the normal dessert serving size so four seemed like a lot.  I asked my husband and he said two cookies was also the standard for his house.  But I just looked up the nutrition facts for Oreos and it turns out they are less calories/sugar than I would have guessed.  Just out of curiosity, what was the norm for y'all?

    I don't remember. Two sounds right. 

    But my parents didn't buy cookies regularly. Or fruit snacks. :( Or "sugar cereals". We got this stuff as a once in a while treat. But that did keep me from eating it. I just got really good at lunch table negotiations. Try convincing a kid that bag of carrots for a fruit by the foot is a good trade....it was a hard life.
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  • edited June 2015
  • sarahuflsarahufl New York member
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    My parents were more focused on just making sure we ate well. So we got fruits and veggies and the occasional sugary snack. We all turned out fine.

    I don't know that we had a strict cookie or snack limit so much as my parents just tried to make sure we were being sensible about it. We also ran around all the time, played sports, danced, etc. IMO, it is more important kids to be sensible about snacking (or anything, really....) than it is to flip your lid about a couple oreos.
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  • theartistformerlyknownastheartistformerlyknownas peaced out. member
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    I guess growing up for me two cookies was the normal dessert serving size so four seemed like a lot.  I asked my husband and he said two cookies was also the standard for his house.  But I just looked up the nutrition facts for Oreos and it turns out they are less calories/sugar than I would have guessed.  Just out of curiosity, what was the norm for y'all?

    We were also two cookies. (Or one Starcrunch/Little Debbie cake)

    When I was a teenager my dad ran into our neighbor at the corner store, where he was buying a half gallon of ice cream for the 6 of us for dessert. She couldn't believe that was all he was getting. Said the 4 of them would polish that whole thing or more off in one sitting... he was like "oh no this will last 2 or 3 desserts..." We eat ice cream out of those little glass bowls, whereas they'd eat cereal bowls full.

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  • bethsmilesbethsmiles Denver, CO member
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    I guess growing up for me two cookies was the normal dessert serving size so four seemed like a lot.  I asked my husband and he said two cookies was also the standard for his house.  But I just looked up the nutrition facts for Oreos and it turns out they are less calories/sugar than I would have guessed.  Just out of curiosity, what was the norm for y'all?

    We were also two cookies. (Or one Starcrunch/Little Debbie cake)

    When I was a teenager my dad ran into our neighbor at the corner store, where he was buying a half gallon of ice cream for the 6 of us for dessert. She couldn't believe that was all he was getting. Said the 4 of them would polish that whole thing or more off in one sitting... he was like "oh no this will last 2 or 3 desserts..." We eat ice cream out of those little glass bowls, whereas they'd eat cereal bowls full.



    That's a lot of ice-cream!

    My family was really big on popcorn as a desert. Which, since we didn't do microwaved drenched in butter and salt popcorn, is actually pretty healthy so there wasn't really a limit on how much we could have.

    I don't really remember if I got a sugary snack in my lunches at school but I'm sure a couple cookies, or a little bag of fruit snacks was the norm. There was one kid who always brought a huge bag of swedish fish to school though. It had to be at least 2 lbs...every.single.day. Now that I could see the school maybe saying something about - not 4 damn cookies.



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