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Etiquette for unvaccinated children?

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Re: Etiquette for unvaccinated children?

  • PrettyGirlLostPrettyGirlLost A Land Filled with Unicorns and Cat Hair member
    5000 Comments Fifth Anniversary 500 Love Its First Answer
    RezIpsa said:
    levioosa said:
    My MOH has an incredibly rare autoimmune disease that requires a ridiculously high dose of prednisone. She has zero immune system, and she didn't get a lot of common childhood vaccines because of it. I would be VERY wary to invite anyone who I knew wasn't vaccinated just because I know how serious of a risk it would be for her. The very old, the very young, cancer patients, people like my MOH, and people with sometimes even with chronic illnesses such as diabetes have a compromised immune system that couldn't fight off a round of the measles. Its worth thinking about, but I would be very quick to say no if the day of the child has viral symptoms, etc. 
    The thing is, many viruses have a period of time where they are contagious, but the host isn't showing any symptoms yet. For example, the measles virus is contagious four days prior to the host showing any symptoms, and 90% of people in close proximity to that host who are unvaccinated/immunocompromised will contract it.  It's too late by the time the host is showing symptoms.  
    ETA: a very important word
    Yep, this is by design.  Viruses/bacteria are smart.

    They couldn't spread themselves if they were only contagious when their hosts were actually symptomatic. . . which would then lead everyone around them to avoid the host so they didn't get sick themselves.
    Jen4948 said:

    In my family there are plenty of people with compromised immunity systems, so inviting unvaccinated persons just isn't an option-even if they are other family members.

    I think that your FSIL needs to live with the consequences of her choice not to vaccinate her kids.  I wouldn't invite the kids.  And if she kicks up drama, I'd tell her, "I'm sorry, but I can't risk my other guests getting sick because of how you choose to parent your children."

    This.  These people- antivaxxers*- need to start understanding that their inaction has consequences, and the rest of us don't have to be supportive of their, frankly, stupidity*.  We don't all believe in the woo.

    *N.B- I'm referring specifically who willfully choose to ignore established science because they choose to buy into Jenny McCarthyism, wacko extreme ant-government nonsense, and unsafe religious believes.  I'm not referring to people who choose to vaccinate their children on a modified schedule as approve by their doctors.
    _____________________________________________

    The bolded is interesting. If I am remembering correctly, there is zero scientific backup for modified schedules, and quite a bit of scientific evidence that the practice tends (in a population) to end up in kids missing vaxs and being at risk. Why do you make an exception for modified schedulers, and not for antivaxxers? Seems like the same level of woo to me, but maybe I am behind the times on that research.

    Because at least they are vaccinating and they are working under an actual physician's supervision.  As long as they get all the vaccines they are supposed to, I'm fine with it.  It's better than opting out all together.

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  • RezIpsa said:
    delujm0 said:
    RezIpsa said:
     
    The bolded is interesting. If I am remembering correctly, there is zero scientific backup for modified schedules, and quite a bit of scientific evidence that the practice tends (in a population) to end up in kids missing vaxs and being at risk. Why do you make an exception for modified schedulers, and not for antivaxxers? Seems like the same level of woo to me, but maybe I am behind the times on that research.


    *****boxes?******

     

    There is no scientific evidence for this...from discussions with the pediatrician we selected, he said basically they will agree to a modified schedule ONLY if the child will still receive all of the vaccinations by the time they are 24 months (which is the same as the regular schedule).  Basically, they just add appointments and spread them out a bit.  And he also said the only reason they agreed to do this is to get more parents to vaccinate.  He was like "if you coming in a few extra times makes you more likely to vaccinate, we'll allow it."

     

    Basically they'll allow it just as a way to get the borderline-vaccine-crazy people to agree to vaccines.  And the kids are still fully vaccinated on the same schedule - by the time they're 2 - but they just don't get as many vaccines on the same day/in the same month as the normal schedule suggests. 

    __________________________

    Yeah, that's what I thought. A follow up study (which I will try to find) came to the conclusion that all those extra appointments just increased the probability that someone would miss one, be late, etc. and we end up with more unvaccinated kids.

    I kind of think pandering to people this way gives more ammo to those who don't get the science. It becomes "If vaccines are so safe, why is everyone doing a modified schedule?" when there just isn't any basis for the conclusion. It's totally laudable that doctors will do whatever they have to to get people to vax their kids, it just seems like it fosters additional suspicion.

    FWIW, on occasion we have modified the schedule.   By that I mean if the 2 mo appointment calls for 5 vaccinations (actual administered shots and not multiple vaccines in one like the TDAP) then we will do 2-3 in one and the rest one month later.   That's not an issue of not believing in vaccines.   It's an issue of dealing with the tripped up cranky inconsolable baby who can run the fever from being pumped full of the vaccines.   I would try to avoid that many as an adult so I have tried to do that for my young babies.

    That doesn't make me a nut job (yeah i know - lots of nut jobs say that) but it's me wanting to minimize the immediate health risk while still maximizing the health benefits of vaccines.   When we did pump DS full of vaccines while we were on vacation, he was a cranky inconsolable feverish mess.
    PrettyGirlLost
  • cofkelcofkel member
    10 Comments 5 Love Its Name Dropper First Anniversary
    I am on the do not invite side of things. Yes there may be other people who are vaccinated who you don't know about, but she made it known. I am immunocomprimised (crohns disease) and have found that even my childhood vaccines are no longer effective due to the state of my immune system. I am very careful about where I go and what I do, as to not risk getting something crazy.
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  • I am in a similar but different situation. I have a VERY close family friend with a 4 year old that will be invited to the wedding. She is not vaccinated due to a genetic disorder. She is also under the weight requirements for almost all vaccines to begin with and she also has seizures that could be induced by fevers associated with vaccines. She also has a low immune system which is probably due to a combination of the above.

    Her parents know the risks and it will be their choice if they want their daughter to attend the wedding. 
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  • As another PP said, unless you are having other children there that are too young to be vacinatted or children (or adults) who's immune system has been compromised (ie cancer, lukemia, etc). I don't think there is a reason to bring it up to other guests or to treat her kids any different.

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