Chit Chat

If the presidential election were tomorrow...

124

Re: If the presidential election were tomorrow...

  • abcdevonn said:
    kkitkat79 said:
    abcdevonn said:
    Am I reading it correctly and those numbers are from 2011-12? Tuition rates also likely rise every year. The three schools I checked in my area absolutely raise rates yearly. @Kkitkat79, again, I think this is another time when you are proposing things that sound great, but are unrealistic and impractical. Where are the scholarships coming from? How are you going to have only 5 students per class? How much will the teachers be paid, and what is your definition of "greedy"? As with your previous arguments, you are ignoring a ton of other factors that influence the cost of education. It would be great if we could send kids from all backgrounds and economic levels to great schools and pay for it out of some scholarship money, but don't you think someone would already be trying to implement this if it were that easy?
    All these are excellent questions! I know what I am proposing may sound unrealistic, but hear me out. As the system moves away from public to private schools public funds will be released. The $11,000 that is currently spent on providing education can be spent on providing scholarship funds.

    The teachers  will be the owners of these new small-scale private schools. So they will get paid total tuition revenue minus expenses. Tuition will be number of children times individual child scholarship fund (so for 5 kids 5x10,000=50,000).

    Again, I am assuming that people are interested in providing the best service they can. I am assuming that just like salaried teachers, self-employed teachers will have their students best interest at heart. If that assumption is unrealistic then never mind.

    Of course, implementing something like that is not easy, but I think it is something worth looking into.
    So let's look at a list of expenses, then:
    • Insurance
    • Any costs for building space - rent, electricity, heat, water, gas
    • Food for breakfast, lunch, dinner
    • Administrative staff and other support staff -  classroom aids, custodial staff, cafeteria workers, nurses, etc.
    • Classroom supplies - pens, pencils, paper, folders, etc.
    • Additional supplies for special education students - not sure what schools traditionally supply, but things like "talkers," equipment needed for accessibility like moveable ramps, etc.
    • Extracurricular supplies - musical instruments, athletic crap, wood and paint and costumes for plays
    That is not even a complete list. Now, how much do you think all of that costs? Because it is a significant chunk of "expenses" that will then be cut from a teacher's salary.

    ~*~*~*~*~ Pretend this is a box~*~*~*~*~*~
    Yes!!! Not to mention furniture and additional funds for repairs to the space.

    [Deleted User]charcoalandblush
  • kkitkat79kkitkat79 member
    First Anniversary First Comment 5 Love Its Name Dropper
    edited August 2015
    @Fran1985, you are assuming all else equal. All else will not be equal. Also, what do words "small-scale" mean to you?
    Anniversary
  • edited August 2015
    abcdevonn said:
    kkitkat79 said:
    abcdevonn said:
    Am I reading it correctly and those numbers are from 2011-12? Tuition rates also likely rise every year. The three schools I checked in my area absolutely raise rates yearly. @Kkitkat79, again, I think this is another time when you are proposing things that sound great, but are unrealistic and impractical. Where are the scholarships coming from? How are you going to have only 5 students per class? How much will the teachers be paid, and what is your definition of "greedy"? As with your previous arguments, you are ignoring a ton of other factors that influence the cost of education. It would be great if we could send kids from all backgrounds and economic levels to great schools and pay for it out of some scholarship money, but don't you think someone would already be trying to implement this if it were that easy?
    All these are excellent questions! I know what I am proposing may sound unrealistic, but hear me out. As the system moves away from public to private schools public funds will be released. The $11,000 that is currently spent on providing education can be spent on providing scholarship funds.

    The teachers  will be the owners of these new small-scale private schools. So they will get paid total tuition revenue minus expenses. Tuition will be number of children times individual child scholarship fund (so for 5 kids 5x10,000=50,000).

    Again, I am assuming that people are interested in providing the best service they can. I am assuming that just like salaried teachers, self-employed teachers will have their students best interest at heart. If that assumption is unrealistic then never mind.

    Of course, implementing something like that is not easy, but I think it is something worth looking into.
    So let's look at a list of expenses, then:
    • Insurance
    • Any costs for building space - rent, electricity, heat, water, gas
    • Food for breakfast, lunch, dinner
    • Administrative staff and other support staff -  classroom aids, custodial staff, cafeteria workers, nurses, etc.
    • Classroom supplies - pens, pencils, paper, folders, etc.
    • Additional supplies for special education students - not sure what schools traditionally supply, but things like "talkers," equipment needed for accessibility like moveable ramps, etc.
    • Extracurricular supplies - musical instruments, athletic crap, wood and paint and costumes for plays
    That is not even a complete list. Now, how much do you think all of that costs? Because it is a significant chunk of "expenses" that will then be cut from a teacher's salary.

    ~*~*~*~*~ Pretend this is a box~*~*~*~*~*~
    Yes!!! Not to mention furniture and additional funds for repairs to the space.
    ETF: STUCK IN THE BOX






    Lol I completely forgot about furniture! There are teachers on this forum who, I am sure, are much more aware of all the additional expenses that go into running a school. It's not just teachers and students sitting out in a field on some public land. 

    I EVEN FORGOT BOOKS

    sparklepants41themuffinman16
  • abcdevonn said:
    abcdevonn said:
    kkitkat79 said:
    abcdevonn said:
    Am I reading it correctly and those numbers are from 2011-12? Tuition rates also likely rise every year. The three schools I checked in my area absolutely raise rates yearly. @Kkitkat79, again, I think this is another time when you are proposing things that sound great, but are unrealistic and impractical. Where are the scholarships coming from? How are you going to have only 5 students per class? How much will the teachers be paid, and what is your definition of "greedy"? As with your previous arguments, you are ignoring a ton of other factors that influence the cost of education. It would be great if we could send kids from all backgrounds and economic levels to great schools and pay for it out of some scholarship money, but don't you think someone would already be trying to implement this if it were that easy?
    All these are excellent questions! I know what I am proposing may sound unrealistic, but hear me out. As the system moves away from public to private schools public funds will be released. The $11,000 that is currently spent on providing education can be spent on providing scholarship funds.

    The teachers  will be the owners of these new small-scale private schools. So they will get paid total tuition revenue minus expenses. Tuition will be number of children times individual child scholarship fund (so for 5 kids 5x10,000=50,000).

    Again, I am assuming that people are interested in providing the best service they can. I am assuming that just like salaried teachers, self-employed teachers will have their students best interest at heart. If that assumption is unrealistic then never mind.

    Of course, implementing something like that is not easy, but I think it is something worth looking into.
    So let's look at a list of expenses, then:
    • Insurance
    • Any costs for building space - rent, electricity, heat, water, gas
    • Food for breakfast, lunch, dinner
    • Administrative staff and other support staff -  classroom aids, custodial staff, cafeteria workers, nurses, etc.
    • Classroom supplies - pens, pencils, paper, folders, etc.
    • Additional supplies for special education students - not sure what schools traditionally supply, but things like "talkers," equipment needed for accessibility like moveable ramps, etc.
    • Extracurricular supplies - musical instruments, athletic crap, wood and paint and costumes for plays
    That is not even a complete list. Now, how much do you think all of that costs? Because it is a significant chunk of "expenses" that will then be cut from a teacher's salary.

    ~*~*~*~*~ Pretend this is a box~*~*~*~*~*~
    Yes!!! Not to mention furniture and additional funds for repairs to the space.
    ETF: STUCK IN THE BOX






    Lol I completely forgot about furniture! There are teachers on this forum who, I am sure, are much more aware of all the additional expenses that go into running a school. It's not just teachers and students sitting out in a field on some public land. 

    I EVEN FORGOT BOOKS

    That's it!  Silly us, there is totes room to scale back on the Department of Educations budget!
    image
    [Deleted User]sparklepants41
  • abcdevonn said:
    abcdevonn said:
    kkitkat79 said:
    abcdevonn said:
    Am I reading it correctly and those numbers are from 2011-12? Tuition rates also likely rise every year. The three schools I checked in my area absolutely raise rates yearly. @Kkitkat79, again, I think this is another time when you are proposing things that sound great, but are unrealistic and impractical. Where are the scholarships coming from? How are you going to have only 5 students per class? How much will the teachers be paid, and what is your definition of "greedy"? As with your previous arguments, you are ignoring a ton of other factors that influence the cost of education. It would be great if we could send kids from all backgrounds and economic levels to great schools and pay for it out of some scholarship money, but don't you think someone would already be trying to implement this if it were that easy?
    All these are excellent questions! I know what I am proposing may sound unrealistic, but hear me out. As the system moves away from public to private schools public funds will be released. The $11,000 that is currently spent on providing education can be spent on providing scholarship funds.

    The teachers  will be the owners of these new small-scale private schools. So they will get paid total tuition revenue minus expenses. Tuition will be number of children times individual child scholarship fund (so for 5 kids 5x10,000=50,000).

    Again, I am assuming that people are interested in providing the best service they can. I am assuming that just like salaried teachers, self-employed teachers will have their students best interest at heart. If that assumption is unrealistic then never mind.

    Of course, implementing something like that is not easy, but I think it is something worth looking into.
    So let's look at a list of expenses, then:
    • Insurance
    • Any costs for building space - rent, electricity, heat, water, gas
    • Food for breakfast, lunch, dinner
    • Administrative staff and other support staff -  classroom aids, custodial staff, cafeteria workers, nurses, etc.
    • Classroom supplies - pens, pencils, paper, folders, etc.
    • Additional supplies for special education students - not sure what schools traditionally supply, but things like "talkers," equipment needed for accessibility like moveable ramps, etc.
    • Extracurricular supplies - musical instruments, athletic crap, wood and paint and costumes for plays
    That is not even a complete list. Now, how much do you think all of that costs? Because it is a significant chunk of "expenses" that will then be cut from a teacher's salary.

    ~*~*~*~*~ Pretend this is a box~*~*~*~*~*~
    Yes!!! Not to mention furniture and additional funds for repairs to the space.
    ETF: STUCK IN THE BOX






    Lol I completely forgot about furniture! There are teachers on this forum who, I am sure, are much more aware of all the additional expenses that go into running a school. It's not just teachers and students sitting out in a field on some public land. 

    I EVEN FORGOT BOOKS

    Any licensing or copyrights for materials. Some educational material is "Fair Use" but some is not and you may have to pay for it. There is usually money budgeted for this. 
    kimmiinthemitten[Deleted User]sparklepants41
  • Fran1985 Fran1985 member
    First Anniversary First Comment 5 Love Its Name Dropper
    edited August 2015
    You also have an additional 6 million students you now have to pay for ( that were in private school but now there is only private school so why would their parents pay) so even though the 10k is a bogus number- you'd be adding another 60 billion that the government would have to come up with and you'd need 10 million teachers lol. Oh and we forgot about the income tax too- your schools are running on a huge deficient and that's if you cut current teacher pay down to almost nothing

    image
    sparklepants41[Deleted User]kimmiinthemitten
  • So basically kkitkat79 wants to privatize everything.
    Well the government is corrupt. The funny thing is, she doesn't even live in the States. The Canadian government system and policies are very different from the American one. She can actually do what she wants to do here, it's called homeschooling. It's very popular. They have homeschooling groups that you can send your kid to where they can learn different subjects by a teacher who is fluent in that subject. You can even pay the teachers if you want, but usually they just want you to teach a class in something you're fluent in.
    STARMOON44
  • @TrixieJess,  increase your size class to 7. However, you have identified the main reason why something like that will be very hard to implement. Some teachers will fight it.

    @sparklepants41, for a school with 5 (or 7) children, how many additional staff do you think you need? Labor cost is significant, but do you really need additional administrative and support staff. Everything else can be relatively inexpensive. 

    Since, I am not a teacher, but many here are, I have a question. If you were given an option to run your own school, would you be interested? To make it concrete, you have 7 students and your budget for everything is $70,0000.






    Anniversary
  • kkitkat79 said:
    @TrixieJess,  increase your size class to 7. However, you have identified the main reason why something like that will be very hard to implement. Some teachers will fight it.

    @sparklepants41, for a school with 5 (or 7) children, how many additional staff do you think you need? Labor cost is significant, but do you really need additional administrative and support staff. Everything else can be relatively inexpensive. 

    Since, I am not a teacher, but many here are, I have a question. If you were given an option to run your own school, would you be interested? To make it concrete, you have 7 students and your budget for everything is $70,0000.






    Uh-oh, you're starting to increase class sizes already. This is a slippery slope. You know, when I started school back in the 80s, class sizes were under 15 children in elementary school per class. Then they increased to 20, then 25, then 30 now they are about 33-35 per class. 

    Just sayin'.

    Also, if you are not paying wages up to what the union sets. No teacher will work for your little school. If you do not use Unionised teachers, there is a chance that they are not properly accredited. You do want these poor little souls taught by proper teachers and not just Joe Blow on the street right?
    kimmiinthemitten
  • So basically kkitkat79 wants to privatize everything.
    Well the government is corrupt. The funny thing is, she doesn't even live in the States. The Canadian government system and policies are very different from the American one. She can actually do what she wants to do here, it's called homeschooling. It's very popular. They have homeschooling groups that you can send your kid to where they can learn different subjects by a teacher who is fluent in that subject. You can even pay the teachers if you want, but usually they just want you to teach a class in something you're fluent in.
    Thank you for bringing this up. So it is possible? What a shock! (sarcasm) Also, thank you for making my point for me.




    Anniversary
  • I asked FI, since he's the teacher.  He said absolutely not.  I asked why:

    1.  It may work well for younger students who only have 1 or 2 teachers all day anyways, that's basically what preschool is like.  But for Middle and High school where students have multiple teachers all day, you would need large classes to cover their salaries.
    2.  Even then it would only work with higher level students.  That type of setting wouldn't allocate resources for social/behavioral issues.  Currently schools employ counselors, social workers, special ed specialists, psychiatrists etc.  What do you with the autistic kids, the cognitively impaired kids, the kid with a shitty home life, the girl who was just raped, the boy who just attempted suicide etc.
    3.  I just want to teach.  If I wanted to run a school, I would get my administrators certificate and become an administrator.  I don't want to deal with the paperwork, the communication with the state, the enrollment, the scheduling etc.
    image
    STARMOON44themuffinman16sparklepants41
  • You also have an additional 6 million students you now have to pay for ( that were in private school but now there is only private school so why would their parents pay) so even though the 10k is a bogus number- you'd be adding another 60 billion that the government would have to come up with and you'd need 10 million teachers lol. Oh and we forgot about the income tax too- your schools are running on a huge deficient and that's if you cut current teacher pay down to almost nothing
    This argument boils down to all the food is private, everyone should be on food stamps. There is nothing new to the idea that rich have to pay for stuff that poor get for free.
    Anniversary
  • kkitkat79 said:
    So basically kkitkat79 wants to privatize everything.
    Well the government is corrupt. The funny thing is, she doesn't even live in the States. The Canadian government system and policies are very different from the American one. She can actually do what she wants to do here, it's called homeschooling. It's very popular. They have homeschooling groups that you can send your kid to where they can learn different subjects by a teacher who is fluent in that subject. You can even pay the teachers if you want, but usually they just want you to teach a class in something you're fluent in.
    Thank you for bringing this up. So it is possible? What a shock! (sarcasm) Also, thank you for making my point for me.




    How does her statement make your point? Your leaps in logic are incredible.

    Also, just because you think something sounds good on paper, it doesn't mean it's possible. You have a very idealized view of how education funding works if you think privatizing education will fix ANYTHING, and your numbers are laughably off re: costs. I would recommend not talking to a subject you clearly know very little about. Just because you read something on Google doesn't make you knowledgeable on the topic.
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  • kkitkat79 said:
    You also have an additional 6 million students you now have to pay for ( that were in private school but now there is only private school so why would their parents pay) so even though the 10k is a bogus number- you'd be adding another 60 billion that the government would have to come up with and you'd need 10 million teachers lol. Oh and we forgot about the income tax too- your schools are running on a huge deficient and that's if you cut current teacher pay down to almost nothing
    This argument boils down to all the food is private, everyone should be on food stamps. There is nothing new to the idea that rich have to pay for stuff that poor get for free.
    So people who currently pay for school continue to without help and people who don't get scholarships?  What's to stop everyone from pulling their kids from private school this year to ensure they get the scholarships next year?  I'm pretty sure your response is that the scholarships are for lower income families.  So what about the higher income families who still send their kids to public school.  Do they now have to pay for private school?
    image
    charcoalandblush
  • kkitkat79 said:





    So basically kkitkat79 wants to privatize everything.

    Well the government is corrupt. The funny thing is, she doesn't even live in the States. The Canadian government system and policies are very different from the American one. She can actually do what she wants to do here, it's called homeschooling. It's very popular. They have homeschooling groups that you can send your kid to where they can learn different subjects by a teacher who is fluent in that subject. You can even pay the teachers if you want, but usually they just want you to teach a class in something you're fluent in.

    Thank you for bringing this up. So it is possible? What a shock! (sarcasm) Also, thank you for making my point for me.






    I didn't make your point for you. I told you that if you would like YOUR children educated in the manner as stated above, your viable alternative is to homeschool or unschool. You may want to use the Google for information on them.

    As a viable solution to fix society's ills when it comes to the entire education system, whatever drugs you're taking, I take two!
  • I really want to know want Fran called KKKat to get edited.

    Your manners are slipping, dear heart. Best go lie down and drink some nice cold sweet tea. <3
    Amor vincet omnia.... par liones.
    Wedding Countdown Ticker

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    luckya23falsaraFiancB
  • I asked FI, since he's the teacher.  He said absolutely not.  I asked why:

    1.  It may work well for younger students who only have 1 or 2 teachers all day anyways, that's basically what preschool is like.  But for Middle and High school where students have multiple teachers all day, you would need large classes to cover their salaries.
    2.  Even then it would only work with higher level students.  That type of setting wouldn't allocate resources for social/behavioral issues.  Currently schools employ counselors, social workers, special ed specialists, psychiatrists etc.  What do you with the autistic kids, the cognitively impaired kids, the kid with a shitty home life, the girl who was just raped, the boy who just attempted suicide etc.
    3.  I just want to teach.  If I wanted to run a school, I would get my administrators certificate and become an administrator.  I don't want to deal with the paperwork, the communication with the state, the enrollment, the scheduling etc.
    Thank you for asking. Number 3 is totally fair, not everyone is entrepreneurial. 

    With respect to 1. He would be the only teacher throughout all the school years. Most school topics can be taught by one person. For highly specialized subjects there could be a teacher exchange network where teachers take turns teaching different subjects in other teachers' schools.

    With respect to 2. The teacher of course will have training in dealing with all kinds of social/behavioral issues. I suspect though that for schools this small there will not be a lot of behavioral problems. Probably no bullying at all. And I believe that especially "difficult" children will benefit from this kind of setup. They will get more attention just because there are less students.

    Appropriate accommodations for special needs kids is the hardest problem to solve. I am not sure what kind of accommodations are available in public schools, I need to look into that.
    Anniversary
  • kkitkat79 said:
    I asked FI, since he's the teacher.  He said absolutely not.  I asked why:

    1.  It may work well for younger students who only have 1 or 2 teachers all day anyways, that's basically what preschool is like.  But for Middle and High school where students have multiple teachers all day, you would need large classes to cover their salaries.
    2.  Even then it would only work with higher level students.  That type of setting wouldn't allocate resources for social/behavioral issues.  Currently schools employ counselors, social workers, special ed specialists, psychiatrists etc.  What do you with the autistic kids, the cognitively impaired kids, the kid with a shitty home life, the girl who was just raped, the boy who just attempted suicide etc.
    3.  I just want to teach.  If I wanted to run a school, I would get my administrators certificate and become an administrator.  I don't want to deal with the paperwork, the communication with the state, the enrollment, the scheduling etc.
    Thank you for asking. Number 3 is totally fair, not everyone is entrepreneurial. 

    With respect to 1. He would be the only teacher throughout all the school years. Most school topics can be taught by one person. For highly specialized subjects there could be a teacher exchange network where teachers take turns teaching different subjects in other teachers' schools.

    With respect to 2. The teacher of course will have training in dealing with all kinds of social/behavioral issues. I suspect though that for schools this small there will not be a lot of behavioral problems. Probably no bullying at all. And I believe that especially "difficult" children will benefit from this kind of setup. They will get more attention just because there are less students.

    Appropriate accommodations for special needs kids is the hardest problem to solve. I am not sure what kind of accommodations are available in public schools, I need to look into that.
    I'm also done after this post.  PP's have told you you need to listen to opposing views and research more.  You asked for a teachers insight, which I thought was evidence you were taking their advice.  But even when a professional with 10 years experience tells you why he dislikes your reform ideas, you pick and choose which one you believe to be valid, based on what?  I could easily counter (you really think you use the same methods to teach 6 years olds as you do with 16 year olds) but I won't waste my time.

    image
    STARMOON44charcoalandblush
  • I really want to know want Fran called KKKat to get edited. Your manners are slipping, dear heart. Best go lie down and drink some nice cold sweet tea. <3


    It is HILARIOUS that what I said got edited. Not a swear, not vulgar. More sweat tea for me indeed. 

    image
    kimmiinthemittenHeatherKatSTARMOON44FiancB
  • kkitkat79 said:



    I asked FI, since he's the teacher.  He said absolutely not.  I asked why:

    1.  It may work well for younger students who only have 1 or 2 teachers all day anyways, that's basically what preschool is like.  But for Middle and High school where students have multiple teachers all day, you would need large classes to cover their salaries.
    2.  Even then it would only work with higher level students.  That type of setting wouldn't allocate resources for social/behavioral issues.  Currently schools employ counselors, social workers, special ed specialists, psychiatrists etc.  What do you with the autistic kids, the cognitively impaired kids, the kid with a shitty home life, the girl who was just raped, the boy who just attempted suicide etc.
    3.  I just want to teach.  If I wanted to run a school, I would get my administrators certificate and become an administrator.  I don't want to deal with the paperwork, the communication with the state, the enrollment, the scheduling etc.



    Thank you for asking. Number 3 is totally fair, not everyone is 
    entrepreneurial. 

    With respect to 1. He would be the only teacher throughout all the school years. Most school topics can be taught by one person. For highly specialized subjects there could be a teacher exchange network where teachers take turns teaching different subjects in other teachers' schools.

    With respect to 2. The teacher of course will have training in dealing with all kinds of social/behavioral issues. I suspect though that for schools this small there will not be a lot of behavioral problems. Probably no bullying at all. And I believe that especially "difficult" children will benefit from this kind of setup. They will get more attention just because there are less students.

    Appropriate accommodations for special needs kids is the hardest problem to solve. I am not sure what kind of accommodations are available in public schools, I need to look into that.


    Now I know you are smoking crack!

    You don't know a single teacher. Teachers are specialized, they major in one or two things and that is what they teach. In order to get into Teacher's College, you need two teachables for Secondary and one for elementary. In middle school (grades 6-8) teachers teach core and a specialty, in secondary, they teach their specialty.

    As for special needs, no. You cannot teach a class of other kids and expect to be able to pay attention to the special needs kids. This is why there are EAs assigned to them throughout the day and they are often taken out of classes.

    You are either completely naive or very stupid. Either way, I'm out. Talk to actual teachers, maybe you will learn something.
    STARMOON44kimmiinthemittencharcoalandblush
  • madamerwinmadamerwin member
    First Anniversary First Comment 5 Love Its Name Dropper
    edited August 2015
    kkitkat79 said:
    I asked FI, since he's the teacher.  He said absolutely not.  I asked why:

    1.  It may work well for younger students who only have 1 or 2 teachers all day anyways, that's basically what preschool is like.  But for Middle and High school where students have multiple teachers all day, you would need large classes to cover their salaries.
    2.  Even then it would only work with higher level students.  That type of setting wouldn't allocate resources for social/behavioral issues.  Currently schools employ counselors, social workers, special ed specialists, psychiatrists etc.  What do you with the autistic kids, the cognitively impaired kids, the kid with a shitty home life, the girl who was just raped, the boy who just attempted suicide etc.
    3.  I just want to teach.  If I wanted to run a school, I would get my administrators certificate and become an administrator.  I don't want to deal with the paperwork, the communication with the state, the enrollment, the scheduling etc.
    Thank you for asking. Number 3 is totally fair, not everyone is entrepreneurial. 

    With respect to 1. He would be the only teacher throughout all the school years. Most school topics can be taught by one person. For highly specialized subjects there could be a teacher exchange network where teachers take turns teaching different subjects in other teachers' schools.

    With respect to 2. The teacher of course will have training in dealing with all kinds of social/behavioral issues. I suspect though that for schools this small there will not be a lot of behavioral problems. Probably no bullying at all. And I believe that especially "difficult" children will benefit from this kind of setup. They will get more attention just because there are less students.

    Appropriate accommodations for special needs kids is the hardest problem to solve. I am not sure what kind of accommodations are available in public schools, I need to look into that.
    These are the most ludicrous arguments I have ever heard. I am now convinced you have very little (or no) grasp on money, infrastructure, or education in general, including your own. None of what you're saying is remotely realistic. You live in a fantasy world if you think any of this word vomit makes sense.

    ETF subject/verb agreement
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  • From this article "Once you propose a solution, people who don't like the solution are less likely to listen to your description of the problem." 

    I think we can all agree that the current school system is bad and it is especially bad for those who are the most disadvantaged. I think the solution is more choice and more competition, and eventual move from public provision of education to private provision of education. If anyone wants to further discuss the pros and cons and various alternatives, I would love to. 
    Anniversary
  • I really didn't want to get involved in this, but I can speak to the Teacher's point of view, so here's mine. 

    My school has 1100+ kids from K-9.  Our annual budget is over $1 000 000.  Teacher salary is 85-90% of that budget.  We have about 70 - 80 staff, including custodial, EA's and office support staff.  We also have class sizes of 30 on average, including Kindergarten  

    When we opened, the PE department was given a one time opening grant of $35 000 for supplies.  We still needed more.  I have no ideas what another departments/grades received. 

    As for teachers teaching everything, I have no idea how to teach a kid to read and write.  They get to me and they can already do that.  I've covered grades 1-3 "tutorial" time, working one on one or in small groups.  I had no idea how to get those kids to read. I have no training in this.  I also could never teach Jr. high math or higher.  Or science.  Elementary teachers here are trained to be generalists, secondary teachers are specialists.  Yes, some go back and forth but most prefer to stay in their age grouping.  You couldn't pay me enough to be a generalist teacher to younger grades.  

    One problem with private schools here is that they can teach their view/philosophy on things.  Often, these are not in line with the curriculum.  They receive very little funding from the Province.  Here, schools that are privately run don't always follow the curriculum, showing that people won't always teach what is best for the kids.  

    If you said I could run a school, we'd have a kick ass PE/Health/Wellness/physical activity/athletics thing going.  My students wouldn't be able to do basic math.  Therefore, I follow the curriculum and teach what I know

    I don't have any suggestions for the US Education system.  I have no idea how it currently works.  We're not perfect here either.  I'm staying out of that discussion  



    madamerwinTrixieJesskimmiinthemitten
  • I can't even follow your train of thought @kkitkat79


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