Invites and Paper

Please check my invitation wording

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Re: Please check my invitation wording

  • OurWildKingdomOurWildKingdom in the 216
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    edited July 2016
    LtPowers said:

    I don't understand why your initials and wedding date are on the rsvp.
    The traditional invitation response form includes the date (as well as the names of the hosts):

    Ms. Sydney Wyly-Hart
    Mr. Dylan Hart
    accept with pleasure
    (or regret exceedingly that they are unable to accept)
    the kind invitation of
    Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Coyne
    for Saturday, the first of April

    (reference)
    OK, I'm confused. We're hosting but don't say that we are on the invitation, but we can say it on the RSVP card? Not being snarky, I really want to know.

    As for the invitation, what (if any) graphics and text are acceptable on the opposite side from the who/what/when/where? Again, not intentionally being snarky. Since I'm designing and printing these myself (as in Microsoft Publisher and Staples), I really want to make sure they're done right.

    ETA: Since the topic of card stock came up, what weight or color of paper are OK to use? All the text is blue.
  • ILoveBeachMusicILoveBeachMusic Indiana
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    LtPowers said:

    I don't understand why your initials and wedding date are on the rsvp.
    The traditional invitation response form includes the date (as well as the names of the hosts):

    Ms. Sydney Wyly-Hart
    Mr. Dylan Hart
    accept with pleasure
    (or regret exceedingly that they are unable to accept)
    the kind invitation of
    Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Coyne
    for Saturday, the first of April

    (reference)
    OK, I'm confused. We're hosting but don't say that we are on the invitation, but we can say it on the RSVP card? Not being snarky, I really want to know.

    As for the invitation, what (if any) graphics and text are acceptable on the opposite side from the who/what/when/where? Again, not intentionally being snarky. Since I'm designing and printing these myself, I really want to make sure they're done right.
    I think this would more appropriate if the bride/groom's parents were hosting. You are right that is you are hosting it yourself you wouldn't include them. I also don't like the accept with pleasure or regret exceedingly(really???). I'm going to a wedding in August. I accepted because of family ties but there is no pleasure in that particular acceptance.
    OurWildKingdomernursejSP29MairePoppy
  • Jen4948Jen4948 Houston
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    edited July 2016
    @SaintPaulGal, you can feel however the fuck you want. But just as I don't expect you to agree with me, don't expect me to agree with you. I don't need to see all that romantic bullshit on your invitation to assume that your wedding is romantic. Presumably all your guests can figure it out simply by the fact that you're getting married.
  • Jen4948 said:
    @SaintPaulGal, you can feel however the fuck you want. But just as I don't expect you to agree with me, don't expect me to agree with you. I don't need to see all that romantic bullshit on your invitation to assume that your wedding is romantic. I can figure it out simply by the fact that you're getting married.  
    I in no way expect you to agree with me.  In fact, I explicitly stated that in my last post.  As long as you provide the necessary who/what/where/when information in a clear fashion on your invitations, you are free to include as many or as few romantic sentiments as would feel authentic to you and your relationship.  My post was meant to provide a counterpoint for the OP; you feel she should purge any romantic references from her invites and I do not.  I have a feeling you and I will send very different invitations to our respective guests, and that is just fine.  I also have a feeling that we will have very different weddings overall, and that is also fine, particularly since I have a feeling all of our guests will be valued and well hosted.

    This is a perfect example of how proper behavior is situational.  Complaining that a wedding makes reference to love feels to me like complaining that a swimming pool has people in swimsuits.  Neither one would be appropriate for the office: if the OP had "OWK and FW, together through time and space" as her professional email signature, that would be weirdly sappy and out of place.  Similarly, showing up to the office in a bikini would be out of place.  But context matters.  You can expect weddings to prominently feature romantic love, and you can expect swimming pools to feature people in swimwear.  Likewise, both scenarios can go overboard: most people would find baby talk or super long gushing to be overkill even at a wedding and a bikini that is just string and pasties to be overkill at a pool.
    MobKazernursejbunnyprincess2014
  • CMGragainCMGragain
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    edited July 2016
    Jen4948 said:
    @SaintPaulGal, you can feel however the fuck you want. But just as I don't expect you to agree with me, don't expect me to agree with you. I don't need to see all that romantic bullshit on your invitation to assume that your wedding is romantic. I can figure it out simply by the fact that you're getting married.  
    I in no way expect you to agree with me.  In fact, I explicitly stated that in my last post.  As long as you provide the necessary who/what/where/when information in a clear fashion on your invitations, you are free to include as many or as few romantic sentiments as would feel authentic to you and your relationship.  My post was meant to provide a counterpoint for the OP; you feel she should purge any romantic references from her invites and I do not.  I have a feeling you and I will send very different invitations to our respective guests, and that is just fine.  I also have a feeling that we will have very different weddings overall, and that is also fine, particularly since I have a feeling all of our guests will be valued and well hosted.

    This is a perfect example of how proper behavior is situational.  Complaining that a wedding makes reference to love feels to me like complaining that a swimming pool has people in swimsuits.  Neither one would be appropriate for the office if the OP had "OWK and FW, together through time and space" as her professional email signature, that would be weirdly sappy and out of place.  Similarly, showing up to the office in a bikini would be out of place.  But context matters.  You can expect weddings to prominently feature romantic love, and you can expect swimming pools to feature people in swimwear.  Likewise, both scenarios can go overboard: most people would find baby talk or super long gushing to be overkill even at a wedding and a bikini that is just string and pasties to be overkill at a pool.
    Of course your wedding can make reference to love.  However, the invitation is not the proper place to do this.
    The purpose of an invitation is to request the guests presence, and to inform them of the important information:  who, what, when and where - NOT WHY!  Leave the sentiment to your ceremony and reception.  This is the proper place for it.
    Is it the end of the world to include sentimental poetry on your invitation?  No.  Just be aware that it is not traditional, and that some people might giggle.  Not exactly the reaction you would be hoping to see.

    httpiimgurcomTCCjW0wjpg
  • OurWildKingdomOurWildKingdom in the 216
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    No sentimental poetry here.  ;)
    CMGragain
  • I'm going to go out on a limb and say that the OP is aware that Queen Victoria didn't include Doctor Who references in her wedding invitations.  If someone giggles at the inclusion, well, I'd say more mirth in the world is a good thing.

    Tradition is not the same as etiquette.  It may not be necessary, but there is nothing wrong with including a meaningful quote on the invitation.  

    Now if it was "You are invited to the wedding of Cuddle Bear and Poopsie Loopsie Bunny..." then that would be inappropriate because it allows over-the-top sentimentality to get in the way of conveying necessary information to guests.  But I continue to stand by their right to include a perfectly reasonable personalized touch.
    OurWildKingdomcharlotte989875ernursejSP29
  • OurWildKingdomOurWildKingdom in the 216
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    I really appreciate everyone's help so far. I'll tinker with it some more and post a screenshot of the front and back of the invitation when I get home.
    ILoveBeachMusiccharlotte989875
  • MairePoppyMairePoppy Connecticut
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    LtPowers said:

    I don't understand why your initials and wedding date are on the rsvp.
    The traditional invitation response form includes the date (as well as the names of the hosts):

    Ms. Sydney Wyly-Hart
    Mr. Dylan Hart
    accept with pleasure
    (or regret exceedingly that they are unable to accept)
    the kind invitation of
    Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Coyne
    for Saturday, the first of April

    (reference)
    Well, that's fancy, LtPowers.
                
  • SP29SP29
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    edited July 2016
    @OurWildKingdom

    I would stick with the simple RSVP card that you designed based on MariePoppy's suggestion. The RSVP card is information for you anyway (you are providing it as a courtesy to your guests as a way to respond; RSVP cards are a modern invention, it is on the guest to reply), you don't need to know that is yourself and FW getting married ;).

    P.S. I just started watching Doctor Who recently, so now I get the reference too ;).
  • I like the small Dr Who image and the fact that th quote says "the doctor".  With that context, I like the "together through space and time". Without those things to add context, I'd be confused and think it was a tad weird (no real snark but just confused). But as it looks above, I really like your invites. Based on your other posts, I am guessing that it suits you and FW and that will be apparent to your guests. Good job. 
    SaintPaulGalMairePoppy
  • LtPowersLtPowers Upstate New York
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    Looking good, but the grammar is a little awkward here. "Saturday" should be preceded by "on", and "two o'clock" should be preceded by "at", with neither preposition (nor "two") capitalized:

    on Saturday, the fifteenth of October
    two thousand sixteen
    at two o'clock

    The year is, as noted previously, optional, but if you want to include it, it might look a little more harmonious on its own line, considering the shortness of the "at two o'clock" line.


    MairePoppy
  • LtPowersLtPowers Upstate New York
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    Oh, and Miss Manners favors mentioning the reception as part of the same sentence:

    L_______, Ohio
    and at a reception
    following the ceremony
    in the K_____ Pavilion

    ... or other similar wording (such as, simply, "and afterwards at a reception"; the location isn't necessary unless it's some distance away from the ceremony).
  • ILoveBeachMusicILoveBeachMusic Indiana
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    LtPowers said:
    Oh, and Miss Manners favors mentioning the reception as part of the same sentence:

    L_______, Ohio
    and at a reception
    following the ceremony
    in the K_____ Pavilion

    ... or other similar wording (such as, simply, "and afterwards at a reception"; the location isn't necessary unless it's some distance away from the ceremony).
    I disagree about omitting the location of the reception. I'm assuming there are other pavilions in the park. Guests need to know which one is for the event. I think your original wording for the reception is fine. I've never seen "and at a reception following"
    SP29
  • OurWildKingdomOurWildKingdom in the 216
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    The grammar's easy enough to fix.

    The ceremony is in the park; only the reception is in the pavilion.
  • LtPowersLtPowers Upstate New York
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    edited July 2016
    I've never seen "and at a reception following"
    Nonetheless, every example in Miss Manners On Weddings uses that or a similar construction. (Except one example of a separate reception insert.)


  • ILoveBeachMusicILoveBeachMusic Indiana
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    LtPowers said:
    I've never seen "and at a reception following"
    Nonetheless, every example in Miss Manners On Weddings uses that or a similar construction. (Except one example of a separate reception insert.)


    OK but Crane's show examples of "reception to follow". My point was that her original wording was correct and didn't have to be changed. They also reception inserts saying reception to follow at such and such address. 
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