Wedding Customs & Traditions Forum

This is new to me

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Re: This is new to me

  • "I mean this with all due respect and it is an honest question: is English your first language or a secondary language for you?"

    I speak Newfoundland-English. Its a dialect but a strong one. So I'm not the best with standard-english. I didn't have to learn it until I was 15.

    As to the people saying it was an inflammatory post, thats not how I meant it to come across at all. I think its just hard for me to explain myself. Its a problem I tend to have when talking to americans a lot. I come across different than I meant. In my head it sounds one way and it seems to sound a completly different tone in another
  • Regional differences do still exist. Everyone still has their own culture. To think otherwise is a very american thing. Your culture isn't the end all to be all. Theres tonnes of cultures in the western world that aren't american.

    The only thing I was trying to do with this post is share that not all cultures have the same etiquette rules and try to open up a discussion as to why these different customs may have developed these ways. But no one seems to have understood what I was trying to get at or the way I word things. And then theres people that think all cultures are the same and have the same etiquette and thats just wrong. Its wrong in so many ways. Its such an elitist view .
    LauraKitsune13scscott06
  • It really isn't elitist at all. Elitist would be if we said that the only acceptable wedding had a full open bar. But no one said that. Everyone says, host what you can afford and don't make your guests open their wallets. It is pretty much the opposite of elitist.

    Just because something is common doesn't mean it can't also be incorrect. Cussing is common, so is spitting and chewing with your mouth open, but they are still rude and against etiquette. Maybe no one in your circle is offended by certain violations of etiquette rules, but that doesn't change the rules.
    Exactly. Etiquette is about hosting your guests well, not cultural norms.

    And OP, you've been coming across really defensive from your first post. If you really, honestly, think there's a difference and that cash bars are not rude where you're from, then you would just ignore those posts and move on. You wouldn't be trying to change our minds about cash bars in general if you think such rules specifically do not apply to just your area, since there are obviously not enough (or maybe any) other Newfoundlanders posting that would be able to take your advice.
    image
    sarahroslansky
  • Charmc09 said:
    Regional differences do still exist. Everyone still has their own culture. To think otherwise is a very american thing. Your culture isn't the end all to be all. Theres tonnes of cultures in the western world that aren't american.

    The only thing I was trying to do with this post is share that not all cultures have the same etiquette rules and try to open up a discussion as to why these different customs may have developed these ways. But no one seems to have understood what I was trying to get at or the way I word things. And then theres people that think all cultures are the same and have the same etiquette and thats just wrong. Its wrong in so many ways. Its such an elitist view .
    You know when a PP said you were making sweeping generalizations and you disagreed? The bolded is a sweeping generalization.
    adwks
  • edited June 2013
    @jennylee813, thank you for sharing your perspective. I would love to learn some of the unique phrases you use, if you're willing to share.
    image
  • lol - no problem. I'm quite proud of my culture and it's unique nature. In fact, my undergrad degree is in Folklore, specializing in Newfoundland Studies.

    Some of my favourites are:

    twacking - it means window shopping. Running around, looking for nothing in particular.
    ie. "I was just out twacking around."

    mauzy - a high humidity day, usually overcast, but not foggy.

    youngster - a child. Originally it meant someone inexperienced in the fishery (a mainstay of our culture, back in the day. Our major fishery collapsed in the 90s, leaving quite a number of people out of work, and taking away their only livelihood)

    The most common phrase to come out of our culture is the greeting: 

    What are you at? (Pronounced: whadda ya at?) Means what are you doing?

    How's she goin'? - much the same, means how is it going?

    The island of Newfoundland has some dialects that are unique hybrids of the brogues from the British Isles, and it can be argued that there are some long lost ones that only survive there. Each community does have its own (or it did, it's much less common now), because they were so isolated. 

    It was originally illegal to live in Newfoundland, but some of the migratory fishermen from Europe hid in the woods and settled for the winters. Once the British government accepted the inevitable, tiny communities started dotting the shoreline. There have been many battles between French and English over the land, so there are pockets of French settlements all over. My FI's family is of French and Irish Descent, mine is Irish.

    We are known as the most friendly people on earth. We have a saying here, "there are no strangers here; just friends that you haven't met yet." It's true. We pride ourselves on hospitality, our parties DO go on for hours (days sometimes), and we perfected the 'kitchen party.' No matter where a party starts, it ends up in someone's kitchen.

    Sorry for the history lesson, I could totally go on about it forever!
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    KDM323Dreamergirl8812mercimarie
  • lol - no problem. I'm quite proud of my culture and it's unique nature. In fact, my undergrad degree is in Folklore, specializing in Newfoundland Studies.

    Some of my favourites are:

    twacking - it means window shopping. Running around, looking for nothing in particular.
    ie. "I was just out twacking around."

    mauzy - a high humidity day, usually overcast, but not foggy.

    youngster - a child. Originally it meant someone inexperienced in the fishery (a mainstay of our culture, back in the day. Our major fishery collapsed in the 90s, leaving quite a number of people out of work, and taking away their only livelihood)

    The most common phrase to come out of our culture is the greeting: 

    What are you at? (Pronounced: whadda ya at?) Means what are you doing?

    How's she goin'? - much the same, means how is it going?

    The island of Newfoundland has some dialects that are unique hybrids of the brogues from the British Isles, and it can be argued that there are some long lost ones that only survive there. Each community does have its own (or it did, it's much less common now), because they were so isolated. 

    It was originally illegal to live in Newfoundland, but some of the migratory fishermen from Europe hid in the woods and settled for the winters. Once the British government accepted the inevitable, tiny communities started dotting the shoreline. There have been many battles between French and English over the land, so there are pockets of French settlements all over. My FI's family is of French and Irish Descent, mine is Irish.

    We are known as the most friendly people on earth. We have a saying here, "there are no strangers here; just friends that you haven't met yet." It's true. We pride ourselves on hospitality, our parties DO go on for hours (days sometimes), and we perfected the 'kitchen party.' No matter where a party starts, it ends up in someone's kitchen.

    Sorry for the history lesson, I could totally go on about it forever!

    I actually don't think most of what you are saying is that uncommon, actually.

    All of our parties in end up in the kitchen. I'm German/Irish, and my partner is Mexican.  that's just where people migrate. 

    As far as the unique phrases, again, I think even certain neighborhoods in cities in the U.S. have random unique phrases.  For example, "yinz" or "yunz" is a Pittsburgh, PA thing.  "Hella" is an Oakland, CA phrase.  

    This isn't directed at you, as much as just a general statement.  Cultures can be different. We can all have our own random phrases, and some things can seem "normal" to us, but that doesn't mean they aren't rude overall.

    It doesn't cost a lot of money to host alcohol. Even with a HUGE, heavy drinking family.  I married a Mexican.  Talk about parties that can last all day and night and into the next day!!  We had dozens of people at our house the day after the wedding at a "finish the kegs" party.

    We had 130 people at our wedding. We had a couple of kegs and I stocked up on wine and champagne for months before the wedding. I probably spent around $500.00 total. But, I also had to choose a venue that allowed me to bring in my own alcohol.   Does that mean that I was limited on venue, yes, sure.  But, that was worth it to properly host my guests.

  • Hey @cmgilpin, I'm with you. Every culture has it's own traditions. I was taking exception to the whole "I didn't have to learn standard English until I was 15." 

    And I loved your pics - I saw them when you posted them first. It looked like you had a lovely wedding!

    (We have a whole dictionary devoted to words and phrases that are unique to our culture, and there are a good many in there that I've never heard of.)
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  • s-aries8990s-aries8990 member
    Fifth Anniversary 500 Love Its 1000 Comments Name Dropper
    edited June 2013
    Charmc09 said:
    Regional differences do still exist. Everyone still has their own culture. To think otherwise is a very american thing. Your culture isn't the end all to be all. Theres tonnes of cultures in the western world that aren't american.

    The only thing I was trying to do with this post is share that not all cultures have the same etiquette rules and try to open up a discussion as to why these different customs may have developed these ways. But no one seems to have understood what I was trying to get at or the way I word things. And then theres people that think all cultures are the same and have the same etiquette and thats just wrong. Its wrong in so many ways. Its such an elitist view .
    Cultural norms =/= proper etiquette. Any sort of set-up involving asking for money MAY be a cultural norm, but it doesn't make it not rude (money dance, money jar, money grabbing, asking for cash).  These norms probably have developed from less to-do families trying to host a better party than they can afford on their own.

    Asking your guests to pay for anything to a party that you invite them to, regardless of the occasion, is rude. If you had guests over for a dinner party would you charge them their wine by the glass? $5 for their highballs? The answer to that is no, and that same answer should be applied to any event you host.

    Are cash bars, money dances, jack & jills (fundraising parites), and money jars common? Yes.
    Does it' mean that they make the culture from which they originate a monstrosity? No.
    Are they rude? Yes.
    Do we care if you have one? We'd prefer you not, but only to keep you from looking like a bad hostess. We can't control whether or not you heed the advice given on the forums.

    My main point is, the general consensus is that asking your guests to shell out money for any part of the party is against etiquette. What's the point in challenging it?

    Edited for spacing.
    ** And to be quite clear, our culture ISN'T the end all be all, and I think most of us know that. We aren't trying to change anyone's culture, just keep them from looking like a butt.**
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  • Thanks for the language/history lesson! That's fascinating!
    Anniversary

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    I'm gonna go with 'not my circus, not my monkeys.'
  • Dreamergirl8812Dreamergirl8812 your closet member
    1000 Comments 500 Love Its Second Anniversary First Answer
    A very interesting conversation thread from this. But aren't OP's original and subsequent posts the definition of trolling?



    Anniversary
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  • I enjoyed this too, I had never heard of a cash bar until TK, I think my family would be deeply offended by one as well, but I'm in the NW.
    image
  • I will back you up!  I am marrying a newfie, so i know how they like to drink hahaha.  There's nothing like them in the world!  My FI told me that there is no way we are having an open bar, even though we are getting married in Kelowna, he has only ever seen one open bar and one toonie bar.  I have been to a few weddings in NFLD and the bar is always full price, and i know even at halls they do not let you bring in your own alcohol. So anyway i get it.  By the way NFLD has been a part of Canada for 63 years- your Canadian
  • cmgilpin said:
    lol - no problem. I'm quite proud of my culture and it's unique nature. In fact, my undergrad degree is in Folklore, specializing in Newfoundland Studies.

    Some of my favourites are:

    twacking - it means window shopping. Running around, looking for nothing in particular.
    ie. "I was just out twacking around."

    mauzy - a high humidity day, usually overcast, but not foggy.

    youngster - a child. Originally it meant someone inexperienced in the fishery (a mainstay of our culture, back in the day. Our major fishery collapsed in the 90s, leaving quite a number of people out of work, and taking away their only livelihood)

    The most common phrase to come out of our culture is the greeting: 

    What are you at? (Pronounced: whadda ya at?) Means what are you doing?

    How's she goin'? - much the same, means how is it going?

    The island of Newfoundland has some dialects that are unique hybrids of the brogues from the British Isles, and it can be argued that there are some long lost ones that only survive there. Each community does have its own (or it did, it's much less common now), because they were so isolated. 

    It was originally illegal to live in Newfoundland, but some of the migratory fishermen from Europe hid in the woods and settled for the winters. Once the British government accepted the inevitable, tiny communities started dotting the shoreline. There have been many battles between French and English over the land, so there are pockets of French settlements all over. My FI's family is of French and Irish Descent, mine is Irish.

    We are known as the most friendly people on earth. We have a saying here, "there are no strangers here; just friends that you haven't met yet." It's true. We pride ourselves on hospitality, our parties DO go on for hours (days sometimes), and we perfected the 'kitchen party.' No matter where a party starts, it ends up in someone's kitchen.

    Sorry for the history lesson, I could totally go on about it forever!

    I actually don't think most of what you are saying is that uncommon, actually.

    All of our parties in end up in the kitchen. I'm German/Irish, and my partner is Mexican.  that's just where people migrate. 

    As far as the unique phrases, again, I think even certain neighborhoods in cities in the U.S. have random unique phrases.  For example, "yinz" or "yunz" is a Pittsburgh, PA thing.  "Hella" is an Oakland, CA phrase.  

    This isn't directed at you, as much as just a general statement.  Cultures can be different. We can all have our own random phrases, and some things can seem "normal" to us, but that doesn't mean they aren't rude overall.

    It doesn't cost a lot of money to host alcohol. Even with a HUGE, heavy drinking family.  I married a Mexican.  Talk about parties that can last all day and night and into the next day!!  We had dozens of people at our house the day after the wedding at a "finish the kegs" party.

    We had 130 people at our wedding. We had a couple of kegs and I stocked up on wine and champagne for months before the wedding. I probably spent around $500.00 total. But, I also had to choose a venue that allowed me to bring in my own alcohol.   Does that mean that I was limited on venue, yes, sure.  But, that was worth it to properly host my guests.


    Alcohol does cost quite a bit more in Canada, actually everything does thats why we cross border shop!
  • niki&rob said:
    cmgilpin said:
    lol - no problem. I'm quite proud of my culture and it's unique nature. In fact, my undergrad degree is in Folklore, specializing in Newfoundland Studies.

    Some of my favourites are:

    twacking - it means window shopping. Running around, looking for nothing in particular.
    ie. "I was just out twacking around."

    mauzy - a high humidity day, usually overcast, but not foggy.

    youngster - a child. Originally it meant someone inexperienced in the fishery (a mainstay of our culture, back in the day. Our major fishery collapsed in the 90s, leaving quite a number of people out of work, and taking away their only livelihood)

    The most common phrase to come out of our culture is the greeting: 

    What are you at? (Pronounced: whadda ya at?) Means what are you doing?

    How's she goin'? - much the same, means how is it going?

    The island of Newfoundland has some dialects that are unique hybrids of the brogues from the British Isles, and it can be argued that there are some long lost ones that only survive there. Each community does have its own (or it did, it's much less common now), because they were so isolated. 

    It was originally illegal to live in Newfoundland, but some of the migratory fishermen from Europe hid in the woods and settled for the winters. Once the British government accepted the inevitable, tiny communities started dotting the shoreline. There have been many battles between French and English over the land, so there are pockets of French settlements all over. My FI's family is of French and Irish Descent, mine is Irish.

    We are known as the most friendly people on earth. We have a saying here, "there are no strangers here; just friends that you haven't met yet." It's true. We pride ourselves on hospitality, our parties DO go on for hours (days sometimes), and we perfected the 'kitchen party.' No matter where a party starts, it ends up in someone's kitchen.

    Sorry for the history lesson, I could totally go on about it forever!

    I actually don't think most of what you are saying is that uncommon, actually.

    All of our parties in end up in the kitchen. I'm German/Irish, and my partner is Mexican.  that's just where people migrate. 

    As far as the unique phrases, again, I think even certain neighborhoods in cities in the U.S. have random unique phrases.  For example, "yinz" or "yunz" is a Pittsburgh, PA thing.  "Hella" is an Oakland, CA phrase.  

    This isn't directed at you, as much as just a general statement.  Cultures can be different. We can all have our own random phrases, and some things can seem "normal" to us, but that doesn't mean they aren't rude overall.

    It doesn't cost a lot of money to host alcohol. Even with a HUGE, heavy drinking family.  I married a Mexican.  Talk about parties that can last all day and night and into the next day!!  We had dozens of people at our house the day after the wedding at a "finish the kegs" party.

    We had 130 people at our wedding. We had a couple of kegs and I stocked up on wine and champagne for months before the wedding. I probably spent around $500.00 total. But, I also had to choose a venue that allowed me to bring in my own alcohol.   Does that mean that I was limited on venue, yes, sure.  But, that was worth it to properly host my guests.


    Alcohol does cost quite a bit more in Canada, actually everything does thats why we cross border shop!
    I realize that. But, you can still serve alcohol for cheap if you do it right. There ARE venues in Canada that let you bring your own alcohol. I know brides on my month board that did it, and there are brides here that have done it.  Being from Canada doesn't eliminate proper hosting options.
  • niki&rob said:
    cmgilpin said:
    lol - no problem. I'm quite proud of my culture and it's unique nature. In fact, my undergrad degree is in Folklore, specializing in Newfoundland Studies.

    Some of my favourites are:

    twacking - it means window shopping. Running around, looking for nothing in particular.
    ie. "I was just out twacking around."

    mauzy - a high humidity day, usually overcast, but not foggy.

    youngster - a child. Originally it meant someone inexperienced in the fishery (a mainstay of our culture, back in the day. Our major fishery collapsed in the 90s, leaving quite a number of people out of work, and taking away their only livelihood)

    The most common phrase to come out of our culture is the greeting: 

    What are you at? (Pronounced: whadda ya at?) Means what are you doing?

    How's she goin'? - much the same, means how is it going?

    The island of Newfoundland has some dialects that are unique hybrids of the brogues from the British Isles, and it can be argued that there are some long lost ones that only survive there. Each community does have its own (or it did, it's much less common now), because they were so isolated. 

    It was originally illegal to live in Newfoundland, but some of the migratory fishermen from Europe hid in the woods and settled for the winters. Once the British government accepted the inevitable, tiny communities started dotting the shoreline. There have been many battles between French and English over the land, so there are pockets of French settlements all over. My FI's family is of French and Irish Descent, mine is Irish.

    We are known as the most friendly people on earth. We have a saying here, "there are no strangers here; just friends that you haven't met yet." It's true. We pride ourselves on hospitality, our parties DO go on for hours (days sometimes), and we perfected the 'kitchen party.' No matter where a party starts, it ends up in someone's kitchen.

    Sorry for the history lesson, I could totally go on about it forever!

    I actually don't think most of what you are saying is that uncommon, actually.

    All of our parties in end up in the kitchen. I'm German/Irish, and my partner is Mexican.  that's just where people migrate. 

    As far as the unique phrases, again, I think even certain neighborhoods in cities in the U.S. have random unique phrases.  For example, "yinz" or "yunz" is a Pittsburgh, PA thing.  "Hella" is an Oakland, CA phrase.  

    This isn't directed at you, as much as just a general statement.  Cultures can be different. We can all have our own random phrases, and some things can seem "normal" to us, but that doesn't mean they aren't rude overall.

    It doesn't cost a lot of money to host alcohol. Even with a HUGE, heavy drinking family.  I married a Mexican.  Talk about parties that can last all day and night and into the next day!!  We had dozens of people at our house the day after the wedding at a "finish the kegs" party.

    We had 130 people at our wedding. We had a couple of kegs and I stocked up on wine and champagne for months before the wedding. I probably spent around $500.00 total. But, I also had to choose a venue that allowed me to bring in my own alcohol.   Does that mean that I was limited on venue, yes, sure.  But, that was worth it to properly host my guests.


    Alcohol does cost quite a bit more in Canada, actually everything does thats why we cross border shop!

    cmgilpin said:
    niki&rob said:
    cmgilpin said:
    lol - no problem. I'm quite proud of my culture and it's unique nature. In fact, my undergrad degree is in Folklore, specializing in Newfoundland Studies.

    Some of my favourites are:

    twacking - it means window shopping. Running around, looking for nothing in particular.
    ie. "I was just out twacking around."

    mauzy - a high humidity day, usually overcast, but not foggy.

    youngster - a child. Originally it meant someone inexperienced in the fishery (a mainstay of our culture, back in the day. Our major fishery collapsed in the 90s, leaving quite a number of people out of work, and taking away their only livelihood)

    The most common phrase to come out of our culture is the greeting: 

    What are you at? (Pronounced: whadda ya at?) Means what are you doing?

    How's she goin'? - much the same, means how is it going?

    The island of Newfoundland has some dialects that are unique hybrids of the brogues from the British Isles, and it can be argued that there are some long lost ones that only survive there. Each community does have its own (or it did, it's much less common now), because they were so isolated. 

    It was originally illegal to live in Newfoundland, but some of the migratory fishermen from Europe hid in the woods and settled for the winters. Once the British government accepted the inevitable, tiny communities started dotting the shoreline. There have been many battles between French and English over the land, so there are pockets of French settlements all over. My FI's family is of French and Irish Descent, mine is Irish.

    We are known as the most friendly people on earth. We have a saying here, "there are no strangers here; just friends that you haven't met yet." It's true. We pride ourselves on hospitality, our parties DO go on for hours (days sometimes), and we perfected the 'kitchen party.' No matter where a party starts, it ends up in someone's kitchen.

    Sorry for the history lesson, I could totally go on about it forever!

    I actually don't think most of what you are saying is that uncommon, actually.

    All of our parties in end up in the kitchen. I'm German/Irish, and my partner is Mexican.  that's just where people migrate. 

    As far as the unique phrases, again, I think even certain neighborhoods in cities in the U.S. have random unique phrases.  For example, "yinz" or "yunz" is a Pittsburgh, PA thing.  "Hella" is an Oakland, CA phrase.  

    This isn't directed at you, as much as just a general statement.  Cultures can be different. We can all have our own random phrases, and some things can seem "normal" to us, but that doesn't mean they aren't rude overall.

    It doesn't cost a lot of money to host alcohol. Even with a HUGE, heavy drinking family.  I married a Mexican.  Talk about parties that can last all day and night and into the next day!!  We had dozens of people at our house the day after the wedding at a "finish the kegs" party.

    We had 130 people at our wedding. We had a couple of kegs and I stocked up on wine and champagne for months before the wedding. I probably spent around $500.00 total. But, I also had to choose a venue that allowed me to bring in my own alcohol.   Does that mean that I was limited on venue, yes, sure.  But, that was worth it to properly host my guests.


    Alcohol does cost quite a bit more in Canada, actually everything does thats why we cross border shop!
    I realize that. But, you can still serve alcohol for cheap if you do it right. There ARE venues in Canada that let you bring your own alcohol. I know brides on my month board that did it, and there are brides here that have done it.  Being from Canada doesn't eliminate proper hosting options.
    yes you are right there are venues that you can bring your own alcohol into. I would be interseted to know what you pay for a case of beer? (12)
  • Charmc09 said:
    Regional differences do still exist. Everyone still has their own culture. To think otherwise is a very american thing. Your culture isn't the end all to be all. Theres tonnes of cultures in the western world that aren't american.

    The only thing I was trying to do with this post is share that not all cultures have the same etiquette rules and try to open up a discussion as to why these different customs may have developed these ways. But no one seems to have understood what I was trying to get at or the way I word things. And then theres people that think all cultures are the same and have the same etiquette and thats just wrong. Its wrong in so many ways. Its such an elitist view .

    niki&rob said:
    niki&rob said:
    cmgilpin said:
    lol - no problem. I'm quite proud of my culture and it's unique nature. In fact, my undergrad degree is in Folklore, specializing in Newfoundland Studies.

    Some of my favourites are:

    twacking - it means window shopping. Running around, looking for nothing in particular.
    ie. "I was just out twacking around."

    mauzy - a high humidity day, usually overcast, but not foggy.

    youngster - a child. Originally it meant someone inexperienced in the fishery (a mainstay of our culture, back in the day. Our major fishery collapsed in the 90s, leaving quite a number of people out of work, and taking away their only livelihood)

    The most common phrase to come out of our culture is the greeting: 

    What are you at? (Pronounced: whadda ya at?) Means what are you doing?

    How's she goin'? - much the same, means how is it going?

    The island of Newfoundland has some dialects that are unique hybrids of the brogues from the British Isles, and it can be argued that there are some long lost ones that only survive there. Each community does have its own (or it did, it's much less common now), because they were so isolated. 

    It was originally illegal to live in Newfoundland, but some of the migratory fishermen from Europe hid in the woods and settled for the winters. Once the British government accepted the inevitable, tiny communities started dotting the shoreline. There have been many battles between French and English over the land, so there are pockets of French settlements all over. My FI's family is of French and Irish Descent, mine is Irish.

    We are known as the most friendly people on earth. We have a saying here, "there are no strangers here; just friends that you haven't met yet." It's true. We pride ourselves on hospitality, our parties DO go on for hours (days sometimes), and we perfected the 'kitchen party.' No matter where a party starts, it ends up in someone's kitchen.

    Sorry for the history lesson, I could totally go on about it forever!

    I actually don't think most of what you are saying is that uncommon, actually.

    All of our parties in end up in the kitchen. I'm German/Irish, and my partner is Mexican.  that's just where people migrate. 

    As far as the unique phrases, again, I think even certain neighborhoods in cities in the U.S. have random unique phrases.  For example, "yinz" or "yunz" is a Pittsburgh, PA thing.  "Hella" is an Oakland, CA phrase.  

    This isn't directed at you, as much as just a general statement.  Cultures can be different. We can all have our own random phrases, and some things can seem "normal" to us, but that doesn't mean they aren't rude overall.

    It doesn't cost a lot of money to host alcohol. Even with a HUGE, heavy drinking family.  I married a Mexican.  Talk about parties that can last all day and night and into the next day!!  We had dozens of people at our house the day after the wedding at a "finish the kegs" party.

    We had 130 people at our wedding. We had a couple of kegs and I stocked up on wine and champagne for months before the wedding. I probably spent around $500.00 total. But, I also had to choose a venue that allowed me to bring in my own alcohol.   Does that mean that I was limited on venue, yes, sure.  But, that was worth it to properly host my guests.


    Alcohol does cost quite a bit more in Canada, actually everything does thats why we cross border shop!

    cmgilpin said:
    niki&rob said:
    cmgilpin said:
    lol - no problem. I'm quite proud of my culture and it's unique nature. In fact, my undergrad degree is in Folklore, specializing in Newfoundland Studies.

    Some of my favourites are:

    twacking - it means window shopping. Running around, looking for nothing in particular.
    ie. "I was just out twacking around."

    mauzy - a high humidity day, usually overcast, but not foggy.

    youngster - a child. Originally it meant someone inexperienced in the fishery (a mainstay of our culture, back in the day. Our major fishery collapsed in the 90s, leaving quite a number of people out of work, and taking away their only livelihood)

    The most common phrase to come out of our culture is the greeting: 

    What are you at? (Pronounced: whadda ya at?) Means what are you doing?

    How's she goin'? - much the same, means how is it going?

    The island of Newfoundland has some dialects that are unique hybrids of the brogues from the British Isles, and it can be argued that there are some long lost ones that only survive there. Each community does have its own (or it did, it's much less common now), because they were so isolated. 

    It was originally illegal to live in Newfoundland, but some of the migratory fishermen from Europe hid in the woods and settled for the winters. Once the British government accepted the inevitable, tiny communities started dotting the shoreline. There have been many battles between French and English over the land, so there are pockets of French settlements all over. My FI's family is of French and Irish Descent, mine is Irish.

    We are known as the most friendly people on earth. We have a saying here, "there are no strangers here; just friends that you haven't met yet." It's true. We pride ourselves on hospitality, our parties DO go on for hours (days sometimes), and we perfected the 'kitchen party.' No matter where a party starts, it ends up in someone's kitchen.

    Sorry for the history lesson, I could totally go on about it forever!

    I actually don't think most of what you are saying is that uncommon, actually.

    All of our parties in end up in the kitchen. I'm German/Irish, and my partner is Mexican.  that's just where people migrate. 

    As far as the unique phrases, again, I think even certain neighborhoods in cities in the U.S. have random unique phrases.  For example, "yinz" or "yunz" is a Pittsburgh, PA thing.  "Hella" is an Oakland, CA phrase.  

    This isn't directed at you, as much as just a general statement.  Cultures can be different. We can all have our own random phrases, and some things can seem "normal" to us, but that doesn't mean they aren't rude overall.

    It doesn't cost a lot of money to host alcohol. Even with a HUGE, heavy drinking family.  I married a Mexican.  Talk about parties that can last all day and night and into the next day!!  We had dozens of people at our house the day after the wedding at a "finish the kegs" party.

    We had 130 people at our wedding. We had a couple of kegs and I stocked up on wine and champagne for months before the wedding. I probably spent around $500.00 total. But, I also had to choose a venue that allowed me to bring in my own alcohol.   Does that mean that I was limited on venue, yes, sure.  But, that was worth it to properly host my guests.


    Alcohol does cost quite a bit more in Canada, actually everything does thats why we cross border shop!
    I realize that. But, you can still serve alcohol for cheap if you do it right. There ARE venues in Canada that let you bring your own alcohol. I know brides on my month board that did it, and there are brides here that have done it.  Being from Canada doesn't eliminate proper hosting options.
    yes you are right there are venues that you can bring your own alcohol into. I would be interseted to know what you pay for a case of beer? (12)
    What kind of beer are we talking? A craft beer, a fake craft beer owned by a big 3, or something basic like bud light? If craft beer, which brewery? Where are we buying it from? Where are we located?  In a liquor store or in a grocery store? Are we talking Canadian dollars or American dollars?

    All of these questions matter because EVERYONE deals with regional differences in costs, not just Canadians. 
    image
  • Do you ever read a word so many times that it doesn't make sense anymore? I feel that way about 'culture' right now.
  • We negotiated a fairly good price with our caterer:  $18.50 p.P. for an unlimited number of drinks. We only offer a choice 1 kind of beer, champagne, 2 wine (one red, one White), whisky, vodka and jaegermeister (+ non alcoholic options: soda, water, orange juice, apple juice).  It's what we can afford to pay (while I'm still in grad school). But again this is Germany, where alcohol is cheap.

     

     

  • niki&rob said:
    niki&rob said:
    cmgilpin said:
    lol - no problem. I'm quite proud of my culture and it's unique nature. In fact, my undergrad degree is in Folklore, specializing in Newfoundland Studies.

    Some of my favourites are:

    twacking - it means window shopping. Running around, looking for nothing in particular.
    ie. "I was just out twacking around."

    mauzy - a high humidity day, usually overcast, but not foggy.

    youngster - a child. Originally it meant someone inexperienced in the fishery (a mainstay of our culture, back in the day. Our major fishery collapsed in the 90s, leaving quite a number of people out of work, and taking away their only livelihood)

    The most common phrase to come out of our culture is the greeting: 

    What are you at? (Pronounced: whadda ya at?) Means what are you doing?

    How's she goin'? - much the same, means how is it going?

    The island of Newfoundland has some dialects that are unique hybrids of the brogues from the British Isles, and it can be argued that there are some long lost ones that only survive there. Each community does have its own (or it did, it's much less common now), because they were so isolated. 

    It was originally illegal to live in Newfoundland, but some of the migratory fishermen from Europe hid in the woods and settled for the winters. Once the British government accepted the inevitable, tiny communities started dotting the shoreline. There have been many battles between French and English over the land, so there are pockets of French settlements all over. My FI's family is of French and Irish Descent, mine is Irish.

    We are known as the most friendly people on earth. We have a saying here, "there are no strangers here; just friends that you haven't met yet." It's true. We pride ourselves on hospitality, our parties DO go on for hours (days sometimes), and we perfected the 'kitchen party.' No matter where a party starts, it ends up in someone's kitchen.

    Sorry for the history lesson, I could totally go on about it forever!

    I actually don't think most of what you are saying is that uncommon, actually.

    All of our parties in end up in the kitchen. I'm German/Irish, and my partner is Mexican.  that's just where people migrate. 

    As far as the unique phrases, again, I think even certain neighborhoods in cities in the U.S. have random unique phrases.  For example, "yinz" or "yunz" is a Pittsburgh, PA thing.  "Hella" is an Oakland, CA phrase.  

    This isn't directed at you, as much as just a general statement.  Cultures can be different. We can all have our own random phrases, and some things can seem "normal" to us, but that doesn't mean they aren't rude overall.

    It doesn't cost a lot of money to host alcohol. Even with a HUGE, heavy drinking family.  I married a Mexican.  Talk about parties that can last all day and night and into the next day!!  We had dozens of people at our house the day after the wedding at a "finish the kegs" party.

    We had 130 people at our wedding. We had a couple of kegs and I stocked up on wine and champagne for months before the wedding. I probably spent around $500.00 total. But, I also had to choose a venue that allowed me to bring in my own alcohol.   Does that mean that I was limited on venue, yes, sure.  But, that was worth it to properly host my guests.


    Alcohol does cost quite a bit more in Canada, actually everything does thats why we cross border shop!

    cmgilpin said:
    niki&rob said:
    cmgilpin said:
    lol - no problem. I'm quite proud of my culture and it's unique nature. In fact, my undergrad degree is in Folklore, specializing in Newfoundland Studies.

    Some of my favourites are:

    twacking - it means window shopping. Running around, looking for nothing in particular.
    ie. "I was just out twacking around."

    mauzy - a high humidity day, usually overcast, but not foggy.

    youngster - a child. Originally it meant someone inexperienced in the fishery (a mainstay of our culture, back in the day. Our major fishery collapsed in the 90s, leaving quite a number of people out of work, and taking away their only livelihood)

    The most common phrase to come out of our culture is the greeting: 

    What are you at? (Pronounced: whadda ya at?) Means what are you doing?

    How's she goin'? - much the same, means how is it going?

    The island of Newfoundland has some dialects that are unique hybrids of the brogues from the British Isles, and it can be argued that there are some long lost ones that only survive there. Each community does have its own (or it did, it's much less common now), because they were so isolated. 

    It was originally illegal to live in Newfoundland, but some of the migratory fishermen from Europe hid in the woods and settled for the winters. Once the British government accepted the inevitable, tiny communities started dotting the shoreline. There have been many battles between French and English over the land, so there are pockets of French settlements all over. My FI's family is of French and Irish Descent, mine is Irish.

    We are known as the most friendly people on earth. We have a saying here, "there are no strangers here; just friends that you haven't met yet." It's true. We pride ourselves on hospitality, our parties DO go on for hours (days sometimes), and we perfected the 'kitchen party.' No matter where a party starts, it ends up in someone's kitchen.

    Sorry for the history lesson, I could totally go on about it forever!

    I actually don't think most of what you are saying is that uncommon, actually.

    All of our parties in end up in the kitchen. I'm German/Irish, and my partner is Mexican.  that's just where people migrate. 

    As far as the unique phrases, again, I think even certain neighborhoods in cities in the U.S. have random unique phrases.  For example, "yinz" or "yunz" is a Pittsburgh, PA thing.  "Hella" is an Oakland, CA phrase.  

    This isn't directed at you, as much as just a general statement.  Cultures can be different. We can all have our own random phrases, and some things can seem "normal" to us, but that doesn't mean they aren't rude overall.

    It doesn't cost a lot of money to host alcohol. Even with a HUGE, heavy drinking family.  I married a Mexican.  Talk about parties that can last all day and night and into the next day!!  We had dozens of people at our house the day after the wedding at a "finish the kegs" party.

    We had 130 people at our wedding. We had a couple of kegs and I stocked up on wine and champagne for months before the wedding. I probably spent around $500.00 total. But, I also had to choose a venue that allowed me to bring in my own alcohol.   Does that mean that I was limited on venue, yes, sure.  But, that was worth it to properly host my guests.


    Alcohol does cost quite a bit more in Canada, actually everything does thats why we cross border shop!
    I realize that. But, you can still serve alcohol for cheap if you do it right. There ARE venues in Canada that let you bring your own alcohol. I know brides on my month board that did it, and there are brides here that have done it.  Being from Canada doesn't eliminate proper hosting options.
    yes you are right there are venues that you can bring your own alcohol into. I would be interseted to know what you pay for a case of beer? (12)


    It depends on what kind of beer.  It could be $10.00 (bud light) or $20.00 (blue moon, etc.), in U.S. dollars.   

    The point is, even if it's triple the price (which I think is unlikely), you could still bring your own beer/wine/signature drinks in for about $1,500.00.  You just have to decide which is more important to you.  Having a classy venue, that you are asking your guests to subsidize, or properly hosting your guests.

     

  • You've sparked quite a discussion here, Charmc! I understand where everyone is coming from, but let's try to be sensitive.  If such venues don't exist in her area of Canada (which is a HUGE country by the way, so don't assume that because some venues in Canada offer this, then they all do) that offer an open bar, then that's just the area and culture.  However, I agree that open bar is totally, freaking awesome and it is the cultural norm in the U.S. when hosting a wedding/celebration etc. We're all here to spread ideas and get good feedback, but let's not let it turn into catiness! :) 

    Thanks ladies, you're beautiful!
  • ViczaesarViczaesar Central Coast, CA member
    Ninth Anniversary 5000 Comments 500 Love Its First Answer
    How does one turn into "catiness"?



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