Etiquette

Would you side eye this ? NWR

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Re: Would you side eye this ? NWR

  • I would have agreed with you until I had my kids. I've never once gone to a birthday party without my kid taking a gift and I don't think there was ever any invited kids who ever didn't bring a gift to my kids birthday parties. Not all parents asked what that my particular kid liked or what size they wore, but the vast majority did when they RSVP'd that they would be coming. I personally believe a kids birthday party is a gift giving event, and although registry information would be wrong, guidance is okay. The kid invitations sent out, even if mailed, aren't really formal in nature, but if you are going the way of Facebook invites a comment on there about likes and sizes is just that, a comment. It can be ignored. 

    As a gift giver I want to make sure the person getting the gift will like what the get. Since it is a child, one that I don't know, and tastes/preferences change on a whim, I do make sure to ask. I wouldn't side eye that information as long as it was general information. But like I said, that is my opinion, as a parent with many parties behind her. 
  • jenajjthr said:

    I would have agreed with you until I had my kids. I've never once gone to a birthday party without my kid taking a gift and I don't think there was ever any invited kids who ever didn't bring a gift to my kids birthday parties. Not all parents asked what that my particular kid liked or what size they wore, but the vast majority did when they RSVP'd that they would be coming. I personally believe a kids birthday party is a gift giving event, and although registry information would be wrong, guidance is okay. The kid invitations sent out, even if mailed, aren't really formal in nature, but if you are going the way of Facebook invites a comment on there about likes and sizes is just that, a comment. It can be ignored. 


    As a gift giver I want to make sure the person getting the gift will like what the get. Since it is a child, one that I don't know, and tastes/preferences change on a whim, I do make sure to ask. I wouldn't side eye that information as long as it was general information. But like I said, that is my opinion, as a parent with many parties behind her. 
    The "vast majority" asking isn't good enough for you lol?
    You ask, the vast majority asks... why does info need to be on the invitation, then?

    And the point of a child's birthday party isn't to "shower" the kid with gifts. Becoming a mom shouldn't have made you decide that.

    What, then, constitutes the formality of an invitation?
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  • Ease of not having to ask, just having the information provided ahead of time. 

    And you are right the point of a party is not to shower the child with gifts, but like I have said, I've never been to a party as a kid and didn't bring a gift, nor have had a party for my kid where the kids didn't bring gifts. It's pretty much a given, whether you agree with it or not (not trying to be rude or snarky, sorry if it comes off that way) that a kids birthday party had gifts involved. 

    As for formality of invitation...I think, again I'm staying on kid's birthday here, if it's got cartoon character's on it with hand written information, printed on your home computer, hand made (like my daughter is planning) then it's not really "formal" in the sense that we tell the brides on here. Now if I were to get a professionally printed invitation from one of her friends to a birthday party then that would classify as "formal."
  • jenajjthr said:

    Ease of not having to ask, just having the information provided ahead of time. 


    And you are right the point of a party is not to shower the child with gifts, but like I have said, I've never been to a party as a kid and didn't bring a gift, nor have had a party for my kid where the kids didn't bring gifts. It's pretty much a given, whether you agree with it or not (not trying to be rude or snarky, sorry if it comes off that way) that a kids birthday party had gifts involved. 

    As for formality of invitation...I think, again I'm staying on kid's birthday here, if it's got cartoon character's on it with hand written information, printed on your home computer, hand made (like my daughter is planning) then it's not really "formal" in the sense that we tell the brides on here. Now if I were to get a professionally printed invitation from one of her friends to a birthday party then that would classify as "formal."
    Wouldn't it be easy to provide gift information on wedding invitations, though?

    I wouldn't go to a wedding without a gift, same as a child's birthday party. Other than the age of the recipients, I see no difference. And I don't see age as being a good excuse, since it's the parent, who should know better, giving out the invitations.

    Not every wedding invitation is professionally printed. As you pointed out, not every birthday party is, either. Why is one okay for gift info, but not the other?

    It's just going in circles because there is no consistency. It's just all exceptions lol.
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  • jenajjthrjenajjthr
    Fifth Anniversary 500 Comments 250 Love Its Name Dropper
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    edited July 2014
    I think age of the recipients is the difference though. Adults know better than to expect anything, therefore shouldn't put anything on their invitations for their parties. I had one birthday party as an adult (mutual 30th for myself and other family members) and I don't think my mom even got me a card. Can I have a do-over? LOL. Kids parties (see below) are kind of like showers, so general gift information is more acceptable, since gifts are, in my experience, 100% mandatory. As for weddings...For my wedding I know I had people not show up with a gift, let alone a card. I didn't care. Even though etiquette goes back forth, gifts are not required but you should take one. I really just wanted my friends and family there. As an adult I know better than expect gifts, get upset if people didn't bring them, etc. That is why I don't think on "Adult" events gift stuff shouldn't be mentioned, because hopefully by the time you get to be an adult you know better. I know baby and wedding showers are the exception, minus any ones personal beliefs on them. A child's party on the other hand is a different beast. Think about it this way. When you go to a wedding you go see the ceremony, go to the reception, eat food, dance, have fun. But at no time do the couple open up any of the presents that are brought. At a child's party, the kids come, play games, sing happy birthday, eat cake, then watch the birthday kid open up the presents. Part of the excitement for the guests (other kids) is to see the birthday kid see what they got. Did they like it, can they play with it, how awesome is it, ooh and ahhh over it.This is very similar to a shower. I hope I'm making some sense, I'm getting tired and my migraine is coming back. I also know we probably are going in circles, but it nice to read how other people feel about this. ETA - TK ate the paragraphs! sorry :^(
  • jenajjthr said:
    I think age of the recipients is the difference though. Adults know better than to expect anything, therefore shouldn't put anything on their invitations for their parties. I had one birthday party as an adult (mutual 30th for myself and other family members) and I don't think my mom even got me a card. Can I have a do-over? LOL. Kids parties (see below) are kind of like showers, so general gift information is more acceptable, since gifts are, in my experience, 100% mandatory. As for weddings...For my wedding I know I had people not show up with a gift, let alone a card. I didn't care. Even though etiquette goes back forth, gifts are not required but you should take one. I really just wanted my friends and family there. As an adult I know better than expect gifts, get upset if people didn't bring them, etc. That is why I don't think on "Adult" events gift stuff shouldn't be mentioned, because hopefully by the time you get to be an adult you know better. I know baby and wedding showers are the exception, minus any ones personal beliefs on them. A child's party on the other hand is a different beast. Think about it this way. When you go to a wedding you go see the ceremony, go to the reception, eat food, dance, have fun. But at no time do the couple open up any of the presents that are brought. At a child's party, the kids come, play games, sing happy birthday, eat cake, then watch the birthday kid open up the presents. Part of the excitement for the guests (other kids) is to see the birthday kid see what they got. Did they like it, can they play with it, how awesome is it, ooh and ahhh over it.This is very similar to a shower. I hope I'm making some sense, I'm getting tired and my migraine is coming back. I also know we probably are going in circles, but it nice to read how other people feel about this. ETA - TK ate the paragraphs! sorry :^(
    I still don't see how offering out gift information on a kids' party invitation is okay. Adults are the ones throwing it. Adults know to bring gifts. And if they don't, then it should be no big deal. I can not imagine being upset that someone didn't bring a gift to my (hypothetical) child's birthday party because presence should be present enough. And I'll be damned if my kid is ever entitled enough to care, either.
    Gifts are never mandatory. I'd be horrified if someone declined to attend my child's birthday party because they felt they couldn't afford a gift (or what ever) thinking that a gift was mandatory. They aren't 100% mandatory, not even a little percent mandatory. It's never too early to teach kids (and parents) that.

    FWIW, apparently it's a growing trend at children's parties to not open the gifts during the party anymore. At least, not in my area and circle. I say area because I attended several kids parties at a few popular event places (Chuck E Cheese, for instance) and no one did a gift opening. And circle because my friends' and their friends looked at me when I suggested it like I had ten heads and a booger hanging out of my ten noses. According to them, it's partly a logistics issue and partly the parents not wanting to deal with the kids having to sit (mostly) still instead of running around playing. This is not something I agree with in any way, shape or form, to be honest.


    Question, are you previewing your replies before posting them? I did that earlier and my paragraphs went away. I'm thinking there is a connection lol.
    image
  • jenajjthr said:
    I think age of the recipients is the difference though. Adults know better than to expect anything, therefore shouldn't put anything on their invitations for their parties. I had one birthday party as an adult (mutual 30th for myself and other family members) and I don't think my mom even got me a card. Can I have a do-over? LOL. Kids parties (see below) are kind of like showers, so general gift information is more acceptable, since gifts are, in my experience, 100% mandatory. As for weddings...For my wedding I know I had people not show up with a gift, let alone a card. I didn't care. Even though etiquette goes back forth, gifts are not required but you should take one. I really just wanted my friends and family there. As an adult I know better than expect gifts, get upset if people didn't bring them, etc. That is why I don't think on "Adult" events gift stuff shouldn't be mentioned, because hopefully by the time you get to be an adult you know better. I know baby and wedding showers are the exception, minus any ones personal beliefs on them. A child's party on the other hand is a different beast. Think about it this way. When you go to a wedding you go see the ceremony, go to the reception, eat food, dance, have fun. But at no time do the couple open up any of the presents that are brought. At a child's party, the kids come, play games, sing happy birthday, eat cake, then watch the birthday kid open up the presents. Part of the excitement for the guests (other kids) is to see the birthday kid see what they got. Did they like it, can they play with it, how awesome is it, ooh and ahhh over it.This is very similar to a shower. I hope I'm making some sense, I'm getting tired and my migraine is coming back. I also know we probably are going in circles, but it nice to read how other people feel about this. ETA - TK ate the paragraphs! sorry :^(
    I still don't see how offering out gift information on a kids' party invitation is okay. Adults are the ones throwing it. Adults know to bring gifts. And if they don't, then it should be no big deal. I can not imagine being upset that someone didn't bring a gift to my (hypothetical) child's birthday party because presence should be present enough. And I'll be damned if my kid is ever entitled enough to care, either.
    Gifts are never mandatory. I'd be horrified if someone declined to attend my child's birthday party because they felt they couldn't afford a gift (or what ever) thinking that a gift was mandatory. They aren't 100% mandatory, not even a little percent mandatory. It's never too early to teach kids (and parents) that.

    FWIW, apparently it's a growing trend at children's parties to not open the gifts during the party anymore. At least, not in my area and circle. I say area because I attended several kids parties at a few popular event places (Chuck E Cheese, for instance) and no one did a gift opening. And circle because my friends' and their friends looked at me when I suggested it like I had ten heads and a booger hanging out of my ten noses. According to them, it's partly a logistics issue and partly the parents not wanting to deal with the kids having to sit (mostly) still instead of running around playing. This is not something I agree with in any way, shape or form, to be honest.


    Question, are you previewing your replies before posting them? I did that earlier and my paragraphs went away. I'm thinking there is a connection lol.
    That is most likely because the venue would not permit them to open the gifts. Once upon a time I worked at one of those places and parents were given a very specific amount of time and they could not pay for more.  So we gave them a choice: they could have cake and food or they could have cake and open presents.  If they served food they were not permitted to open the gifts at our venue.  Taking time out of the activities to open gifts was not present as an option.  
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  • mysticl said:




    jenajjthr said:

    I think age of the recipients is the difference though. Adults know better than to expect anything, therefore shouldn't put anything on their invitations for their parties. I had one birthday party as an adult (mutual 30th for myself and other family members) and I don't think my mom even got me a card. Can I have a do-over? LOL. Kids parties (see below) are kind of like showers, so general gift information is more acceptable, since gifts are, in my experience, 100% mandatory.


    As for weddings...For my wedding I know I had people not show up with a gift, let alone a card. I didn't care. Even though etiquette goes back forth, gifts are not required but you should take one. I really just wanted my friends and family there. As an adult I know better than expect gifts, get upset if people didn't bring them, etc. That is why I don't think on "Adult" events gift stuff shouldn't be mentioned, because hopefully by the time you get to be an adult you know better. I know baby and wedding showers are the exception, minus any ones personal beliefs on them.


    A child's party on the other hand is a different beast. Think about it this way. When you go to a wedding you go see the ceremony, go to the reception, eat food, dance, have fun. But at no time do the couple open up any of the presents that are brought. At a child's party, the kids come, play games, sing happy birthday, eat cake, then watch the birthday kid open up the presents. Part of the excitement for the guests (other kids) is to see the birthday kid see what they got. Did they like it, can they play with it, how awesome is it, ooh and ahhh over it.This is very similar to a shower.


    I hope I'm making some sense, I'm getting tired and my migraine is coming back. I also know we probably are going in circles, but it nice to read how other people feel about this.



    ETA - TK ate the paragraphs! sorry :^(

    I still don't see how offering out gift information on a kids' party invitation is okay. Adults are the ones throwing it. Adults know to bring gifts. And if they don't, then it should be no big deal. I can not imagine being upset that someone didn't bring a gift to my (hypothetical) child's birthday party because presence should be present enough. And I'll be damned if my kid is ever entitled enough to care, either.
    Gifts are never mandatory. I'd be horrified if someone declined to attend my child's birthday party because they felt they couldn't afford a gift (or what ever) thinking that a gift was mandatory. They aren't 100% mandatory, not even a little percent mandatory. It's never too early to teach kids (and parents) that.

    FWIW, apparently it's a growing trend at children's parties to not open the gifts during the party anymore. At least, not in my area and circle. I say area because I attended several kids parties at a few popular event places (Chuck E Cheese, for instance) and no one did a gift opening. And circle because my friends' and their friends looked at me when I suggested it like I had ten heads and a booger hanging out of my ten noses. According to them, it's partly a logistics issue and partly the parents not wanting to deal with the kids having to sit (mostly) still instead of running around playing. This is not something I agree with in any way, shape or form, to be honest.


    Question, are you previewing your replies before posting them? I did that earlier and my paragraphs went away. I'm thinking there is a connection lol.

    That is most likely because the venue would not permit them to open the gifts. Once upon a time I worked at one of those places and parents were given a very specific amount of time and they could not pay for more.  So we gave them a choice: they could have cake and food or they could have cake and open presents.  If they served food they were not permitted to open the gifts at our venue.  Taking time out of the activities to open gifts was not present as an option.  

    Right and the parents were okay with that. It happened at a few places, including twice at home parties.
    I understand that opening gifts can take awhile, but it can take awhile no matter what the age of the majority of the guests.

    image
  • jenajjthr said:
    I think age of the recipients is the difference though. Adults know better than to expect anything, therefore shouldn't put anything on their invitations for their parties. I had one birthday party as an adult (mutual 30th for myself and other family members) and I don't think my mom even got me a card. Can I have a do-over? LOL. Kids parties (see below) are kind of like showers, so general gift information is more acceptable, since gifts are, in my experience, 100% mandatory. As for weddings...For my wedding I know I had people not show up with a gift, let alone a card. I didn't care. Even though etiquette goes back forth, gifts are not required but you should take one. I really just wanted my friends and family there. As an adult I know better than expect gifts, get upset if people didn't bring them, etc. That is why I don't think on "Adult" events gift stuff shouldn't be mentioned, because hopefully by the time you get to be an adult you know better. I know baby and wedding showers are the exception, minus any ones personal beliefs on them. A child's party on the other hand is a different beast. Think about it this way. When you go to a wedding you go see the ceremony, go to the reception, eat food, dance, have fun. But at no time do the couple open up any of the presents that are brought. At a child's party, the kids come, play games, sing happy birthday, eat cake, then watch the birthday kid open up the presents. Part of the excitement for the guests (other kids) is to see the birthday kid see what they got. Did they like it, can they play with it, how awesome is it, ooh and ahhh over it.This is very similar to a shower. I hope I'm making some sense, I'm getting tired and my migraine is coming back. I also know we probably are going in circles, but it nice to read how other people feel about this. ETA - TK ate the paragraphs! sorry :^(
    I still don't see how offering out gift information on a kids' party invitation is okay. Adults are the ones throwing it. Adults know to bring gifts. And if they don't, then it should be no big deal. I can not imagine being upset that someone didn't bring a gift to my (hypothetical) child's birthday party because presence should be present enough. And I'll be damned if my kid is ever entitled enough to care, either.
    Gifts are never mandatory. I'd be horrified if someone declined to attend my child's birthday party because they felt they couldn't afford a gift (or what ever) thinking that a gift was mandatory. They aren't 100% mandatory, not even a little percent mandatory. It's never too early to teach kids (and parents) that.

    FWIW, apparently it's a growing trend at children's parties to not open the gifts during the party anymore. At least, not in my area and circle. I say area because I attended several kids parties at a few popular event places (Chuck E Cheese, for instance) and no one did a gift opening. And circle because my friends' and their friends looked at me when I suggested it like I had ten heads and a booger hanging out of my ten noses. According to them, it's partly a logistics issue and partly the parents not wanting to deal with the kids having to sit (mostly) still instead of running around playing. This is not something I agree with in any way, shape or form, to be honest.


    Question, are you previewing your replies before posting them? I did that earlier and my paragraphs went away. I'm thinking there is a connection lol.
    That is most likely because the venue would not permit them to open the gifts. Once upon a time I worked at one of those places and parents were given a very specific amount of time and they could not pay for more.  So we gave them a choice: they could have cake and food or they could have cake and open presents.  If they served food they were not permitted to open the gifts at our venue.  Taking time out of the activities to open gifts was not present as an option.  
    Right and the parents were okay with that. It happened at a few places, including twice at home parties. I understand that opening gifts can take awhile, but it can take awhile no matter what the age of the majority of the guests.
    I was just pointing out that it may not have been the parents' choice. The kid may have had their heart set on the party venue or the parent may not have wanted people in their house so they sacrificed the gift opening in favor of the venue.  You're right that it can take a while no matter what the age.  But no one could have had food/cake/ and opened gifts in the time we allotted unless they ripped the paper off each gift and threw it in a bag without looking at it. Our policy was because you got 90 minutes door to door.  One hour for activities and 30 minutes minutes for food/cake or cake/presents and then you had to get out because we had half an hour to flip to the next party or half and hour to clean and leave because the boss didn't want to pay OT.  
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  • 90 minutes is the same amount of time we had for birthday parties when we were little. We had time for fun, games, pizza, cake AND opening presents.

    It is absolutely the parents' choice. Your kid had their heart set on a place that doesn't allow time for gift opening? Too bad, so sad, pick a different place. Or cut the guest list.
    image
  • 90 minutes is the same amount of time we had for birthday parties when we were little. We had time for fun, games, pizza, cake AND opening presents. It is absolutely the parents' choice. Your kid had their heart set on a place that doesn't allow time for gift opening? Too bad, so sad, pick a different place. Or cut the guest list.
    When you hold the party in your home you can control the schedule and make adjustments where needed to get everything in and if goes a little over 90 minutes no one is forcing you out the door.  Yes, it is the parent's choice if they want to use that venue and they may decide that having the venue is more important than opening gifts (but would do the gift opening if the party was in their home). Many of our clients picked the venue because they did not want to have a party in their home.  Plus, there is also the competition that some people now feel they have to participate in to have the 'best" party.  As for cutting the guest list, at our venue it didn't matter if you only had two guests. If you wanted to serve food and cake we absolutely would not let you open the presents nor would we charge you any less for having fewer guests.  Our pricing allowed up to a certain number of kids, you could add up to 10 more for an additional fee.  
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  • mysticl said:
    90 minutes is the same amount of time we had for birthday parties when we were little. We had time for fun, games, pizza, cake AND opening presents. It is absolutely the parents' choice. Your kid had their heart set on a place that doesn't allow time for gift opening? Too bad, so sad, pick a different place. Or cut the guest list.
    When you hold the party in your home you can control the schedule and make adjustments where needed to get everything in and if goes a little over 90 minutes no one is forcing you out the door.  Yes, it is the parent's choice if they want to use that venue and they may decide that having the venue is more important than opening gifts (but would do the gift opening if the party was in their home). Many of our clients picked the venue because they did not want to have a party in their home.  Plus, there is also the competition that some people now feel they have to participate in to have the 'best" party.  As for cutting the guest list, at our venue it didn't matter if you only had two guests. If you wanted to serve food and cake we absolutely would not let you open the presents nor would we charge you any less for having fewer guests.  Our pricing allowed up to a certain number of kids, you could add up to 10 more for an additional fee.  
    So now I have another question... IF we said that birthday parties are like bridal/baby showers in that gift information on the registry is okay, then does the same ring true for gift openings at these parties?
    image
  • jenajjthr said:
    I think age of the recipients is the difference though. Adults know better than to expect anything, therefore shouldn't put anything on their invitations for their parties. I had one birthday party as an adult (mutual 30th for myself and other family members) and I don't think my mom even got me a card. Can I have a do-over? LOL. Kids parties (see below) are kind of like showers, so general gift information is more acceptable, since gifts are, in my experience, 100% mandatory. As for weddings...For my wedding I know I had people not show up with a gift, let alone a card. I didn't care. Even though etiquette goes back forth, gifts are not required but you should take one. I really just wanted my friends and family there. As an adult I know better than expect gifts, get upset if people didn't bring them, etc. That is why I don't think on "Adult" events gift stuff shouldn't be mentioned, because hopefully by the time you get to be an adult you know better. I know baby and wedding showers are the exception, minus any ones personal beliefs on them. A child's party on the other hand is a different beast. Think about it this way. When you go to a wedding you go see the ceremony, go to the reception, eat food, dance, have fun. But at no time do the couple open up any of the presents that are brought. At a child's party, the kids come, play games, sing happy birthday, eat cake, then watch the birthday kid open up the presents. Part of the excitement for the guests (other kids) is to see the birthday kid see what they got. Did they like it, can they play with it, how awesome is it, ooh and ahhh over it.This is very similar to a shower. I hope I'm making some sense, I'm getting tired and my migraine is coming back. I also know we probably are going in circles, but it nice to read how other people feel about this. ETA - TK ate the paragraphs! sorry :^(
    I still don't see how offering out gift information on a kids' party invitation is okay. Adults are the ones throwing it. Adults know to bring gifts. And if they don't, then it should be no big deal. I can not imagine being upset that someone didn't bring a gift to my (hypothetical) child's birthday party because presence should be present enough. And I'll be damned if my kid is ever entitled enough to care, either.
    Gifts are never mandatory. I'd be horrified if someone declined to attend my child's birthday party because they felt they couldn't afford a gift (or what ever) thinking that a gift was mandatory. They aren't 100% mandatory, not even a little percent mandatory. It's never too early to teach kids (and parents) that.

    FWIW, apparently it's a growing trend at children's parties to not open the gifts during the party anymore. At least, not in my area and circle. I say area because I attended several kids parties at a few popular event places (Chuck E Cheese, for instance) and no one did a gift opening. And circle because my friends' and their friends looked at me when I suggested it like I had ten heads and a booger hanging out of my ten noses. According to them, it's partly a logistics issue and partly the parents not wanting to deal with the kids having to sit (mostly) still instead of running around playing. This is not something I agree with in any way, shape or form, to be honest.


    Question, are you previewing your replies before posting them? I did that earlier and my paragraphs went away. I'm thinking there is a connection lol.


    And now I'm stuck in the box? Really TK? How do you preview, just for future reference.

    I have been to 1 birthday party where gifts were not opened. The family had moved from the NJ area, I think, and she made a comment to some of the local moms that it gift opening wasn't done in front of the guests. I don't know if it was a regional thing or a family thing, she didn't elaborate and I didn't ask. As for a venue thing, as other PP's have said, venues make money on how many parties they can throw, so the more parties they can have the more money they can make. They have a "schedule." I had a party for my daughter a few years ago at Chuck E. Cheese and I didn't go according to their schedule and the hostess gave me hell. My daughter and her friends wanted to open her presents so we did. 

    When a person declines a party we don't know why they didn't, could be schedule, could be their kid doesn't want to go, could be they don't have the money to buy a gift.  I also taught my children not to be upset if kids showed up without gifts, but that never happened. That is because when you go to a kids birthday party you take a gift, that is something I taught my kids. When invited to a birthday party, you take a gift.

     I would hate to think that any friends had to decline an invite because they couldn't afford a gift, even a simple gift, as well. As an adult I would prefer them at the party to enjoy the fun, games, and cake as well. But I also understand if a parent does decline for that same reason. It's an awful catch-22. I can't ask them why they aren't coming to let them know a gift isn't needed. 
  • I'm not going to bother quoting properly, because clearly TK doesn't want us to, but this line...
    It's an awful catch-22. I can't ask them why they aren't coming to let them know a gift isn't needed.
    ...is so true and it kind of sucks. I mean, of course we can't just ask, "Why did you say no?" but if it's an avoidable reason, then it would good to know. And not many people are going to come right out with "We can't even afford a gift from the Dollar Tree right now..."
    I have a dear friend who had to admit to me that she couldn't even afford to pay me a small sum of money back that I had lent her (We're talking under $25 here) because there was nothing left in the checking account after her bills came in last month. As it was she had to default on a few. I know that was a very difficult confession to had to make and I'm one of her best friends. Imagine if I was just some random mother in her child's play group? "Sorry, my son can't attend your daughter's birthday party. Why? Because... I have a dentist appointment that day. I mean, he has a dentist appointment that day. We all have appointments that day, the whole family..."
    image
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