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Parental Say in College Majors

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Re: Parental Say in College Majors


  • CMGragain said:
    ernursej said:
    @CMGragain, where I live, you must have a teaching degree. My sister taught music for a while but she still had to have her degree.
    Maybe I wasn't clear.  I majored in music and minored in education.  It took an extra semester to do this,  People who did not minor in education could not teach, and most were not able to find jobs unless they were extrordinarily talented.  (Like, they won the Met auditions.)
    You also taught a while ago. Licensing requirements are different now. She's saying that the minor in education would not be adequate these days, even if you were teaching music. 

    I graduated with a Bachelors of Science degree from a liberal arts college and all I got for it was debt. Choosing that college was the biggest mistake I ever made. But I was young, stupid and idealistic. I wish my parents had tried to talk me out if it and encouraged me to go to the UW  instead of the worthless school I chose to go to because I stupidly thought it would get respect in the environmental community but I was dead wrong. My degree is worthless because the liberal arts school I went to is worthless.

    If i had a kid, damn straight I would do everything in my power to dissuade liberal arts.   Damn straight I would refuse to pay for it.  Because I have first hand, real world experience of what a colossal mistake it is.  If I had gone to a respected college I would have a stood a chance.  
    A B.S. in what specifically?  And what field where you trying to get into exactly?  "Environmental" is a broad category.

    I don't think your issue was with a liberal arts college but perhaps with yours specifically, or your chosen major and/or your desired field of occupation.

    I went to a liberal arts college (B.S. in Bio) that is extremely strong in all their science degrees and has very high placement in grad school, med school, and the job market outside of undergrad bc it's a well respected college and has name recognition.
    Yep. It wouldn't have made sense for me to study theology at Purdue; it does make sense for me to study engineering. It does make sense for me to study political science at Wellesley (although I have to be open to a variety of professions related to that); it doesn't make sense for me to study astronomy. It doesn't make sense for me to study anything at ITT Tech. (Too soon?)
    However, you could have studied engineering at Purdue then received a Masters in theology like DD's best friend's husband did. Nope, not too soon about ITT Tech.
  • flantasticflantastic The Midwest member
    2500 Comments Fifth Anniversary 500 Love Its 5 Answers

    CMGragain said:
    ernursej said:
    @CMGragain, where I live, you must have a teaching degree. My sister taught music for a while but she still had to have her degree.
    Maybe I wasn't clear.  I majored in music and minored in education.  It took an extra semester to do this,  People who did not minor in education could not teach, and most were not able to find jobs unless they were extrordinarily talented.  (Like, they won the Met auditions.)
    You also taught a while ago. Licensing requirements are different now. She's saying that the minor in education would not be adequate these days, even if you were teaching music. 

    I graduated with a Bachelors of Science degree from a liberal arts college and all I got for it was debt. Choosing that college was the biggest mistake I ever made. But I was young, stupid and idealistic. I wish my parents had tried to talk me out if it and encouraged me to go to the UW  instead of the worthless school I chose to go to because I stupidly thought it would get respect in the environmental community but I was dead wrong. My degree is worthless because the liberal arts school I went to is worthless.

    If i had a kid, damn straight I would do everything in my power to dissuade liberal arts.   Damn straight I would refuse to pay for it.  Because I have first hand, real world experience of what a colossal mistake it is.  If I had gone to a respected college I would have a stood a chance.  
    A B.S. in what specifically?  And what field where you trying to get into exactly?  "Environmental" is a broad category.

    I don't think your issue was with a liberal arts college but perhaps with yours specifically, or your chosen major and/or your desired field of occupation.

    I went to a liberal arts college (B.S. in Bio) that is extremely strong in all their science degrees and has very high placement in grad school, med school, and the job market outside of undergrad bc it's a well respected college and has name recognition.
    Yep. It wouldn't have made sense for me to study theology at Purdue; it does make sense for me to study engineering. It does make sense for me to study political science at Wellesley (although I have to be open to a variety of professions related to that); it doesn't make sense for me to study astronomy. It doesn't make sense for me to study anything at ITT Tech. (Too soon?)
    However, you could have studied engineering at Purdue then received a Masters in theology like DD's best friend's husband did. Nope, not too soon about ITT Tech.
    I feel like there's a 10% chance I know him or know of him. (The theology graduate world is very small, especially once Indiana is in the mix.)

  • CMGragain said:
    ernursej said:
    @CMGragain, where I live, you must have a teaching degree. My sister taught music for a while but she still had to have her degree.
    Maybe I wasn't clear.  I majored in music and minored in education.  It took an extra semester to do this,  People who did not minor in education could not teach, and most were not able to find jobs unless they were extrordinarily talented.  (Like, they won the Met auditions.)
    You also taught a while ago. Licensing requirements are different now. She's saying that the minor in education would not be adequate these days, even if you were teaching music. 

    I graduated with a Bachelors of Science degree from a liberal arts college and all I got for it was debt. Choosing that college was the biggest mistake I ever made. But I was young, stupid and idealistic. I wish my parents had tried to talk me out if it and encouraged me to go to the UW  instead of the worthless school I chose to go to because I stupidly thought it would get respect in the environmental community but I was dead wrong. My degree is worthless because the liberal arts school I went to is worthless.

    If i had a kid, damn straight I would do everything in my power to dissuade liberal arts.   Damn straight I would refuse to pay for it.  Because I have first hand, real world experience of what a colossal mistake it is.  If I had gone to a respected college I would have a stood a chance.  
    A B.S. in what specifically?  And what field where you trying to get into exactly?  "Environmental" is a broad category.

    I don't think your issue was with a liberal arts college but perhaps with yours specifically, or your chosen major and/or your desired field of occupation.

    I went to a liberal arts college (B.S. in Bio) that is extremely strong in all their science degrees and has very high placement in grad school, med school, and the job market outside of undergrad bc it's a well respected college and has name recognition.
    Yep. It wouldn't have made sense for me to study theology at Purdue; it does make sense for me to study engineering. It does make sense for me to study political science at Wellesley (although I have to be open to a variety of professions related to that); it doesn't make sense for me to study astronomy. It doesn't make sense for me to study anything at ITT Tech. (Too soon?)
    However, you could have studied engineering at Purdue then received a Masters in theology like DD's best friend's husband did. Nope, not too soon about ITT Tech.
    I feel like there's a 10% chance I know him or know of him. (The theology graduate world is very small, especially once Indiana is in the mix.)
    You might! I also could be wrong - he might have a Masters of Divinity- not sure.
  • CMGragain said:
    ernursej said:
    @CMGragain, where I live, you must have a teaching degree. My sister taught music for a while but she still had to have her degree.
    Maybe I wasn't clear.  I majored in music and minored in education.  It took an extra semester to do this,  People who did not minor in education could not teach, and most were not able to find jobs unless they were extrordinarily talented.  (Like, they won the Met auditions.)

    No, you were clear. Where I live you have to have a degree in something first (math, science, music ... basket weaving perhaps) and then do a teaching degree on top. There is no minor allowed.
    SP29
  • I graduated with a Bachelors of Science degree from a liberal arts college and all I got for it was debt. Choosing that college was the biggest mistake I ever made. But I was young, stupid and idealistic. I wish my parents had tried to talk me out if it and encouraged me to go to the UW  instead of the worthless school I chose to go to because I stupidly thought it would get respect in the environmental community but I was dead wrong. My degree is worthless because the liberal arts school I went to is worthless.

    If i had a kid, damn straight I would do everything in my power to dissuade liberal arts.   Damn straight I would refuse to pay for it.  Because I have first hand, real world experience of what a colossal mistake it is.  If I had gone to a respected college I would have a stood a chance.  



    SIB. There are plenty of respected colleges in liberal arts. You'd refuse to pay for Williams because you made some bad choices? That's manipulative and plain dumb  

  • This will tell you a lot about the state of education in Oklahoma. You have to have a bachelor's degree in anything, then you can get a teaching certificate.
    Texas is in such need of math and science teachers that anyone with a bachelor degree in a math or science field can start teaching and get the certificate, paid for by the state, while school is in session. At least, that was the case about 10 years ago.
    "Marriage is so disruptive to one's social circle." - Mr. Woodhouse
  • vikinganna87vikinganna87 Live Free or Die member
    Fifth Anniversary 250 Love Its 100 Comments First Answer
    edited September 2016
    @TheMostHappy15
    I applaud you for raising this relevant and contentious topic.  

    I'm torn on this subject and appreciate its complexity. I had the luxury of graduating from a liberal arts college in 2000 when - at least in Boston - anyone with a pulse could get hired into a job that would be extremely difficult for a recent college graduate to land these days. An alumnus helped get me through the door.  While I worked there I took evening graduate classes in finance because I had no business background aside from my part-time jobs.  5 years later I went back for a full-time MBA.  Now, 16 years after college, I'm doing something completely different, even though I feel like my work experience and education has been relevant and useful.

    Had I gone to a different type of college and majored in business, would I have "needed" the MBA?  Maybe not.  Would I have been more prepared for the workplace?  Absolutely.  But I don't regret a single class I've taken over the course of my education, even the ones that felt crappy at the time.  There is something to be said for being well-rounded.  And, whether we like it or not, sometimes taking on huge loans to attend a college with a strong alumni network will seem worth it compared to a more affordable institution where you study something that gets you better prepared for a job immediately after graduation.  

    As with anything, education is what you make of it. If you hustle and work hard, or even if you don't work hard but eventually get your shit together, you'll be rewarded.  I'm happy to not be living in a time when - at a relatively early age - you have to choose a lifelong career. Some people have a calling early on, but many don't.  And we change our minds.  I firmly believe that an education is the best investment you can make, and I support a diversity of coursework to broaden our minds.   I also believe that that depth and breadth - liberal arts, humanities, taking a variety of courses - is helpful for future career changes. Of course, it depends on the size of the investment, sacrifices needed and how long you're willing to pay off debt. But every mind works differently and there's something to be said for hands-on learning opportunities like internships and co-ops. I think we need more high school options that prepare students for work after graduation >> high school graduation.  College isn't for everyone.  And college RIGHT after high school isn't for everyone.  It just irks me when people who are miserable in their careers make fun of others for majoring in sociology, for example, because they deem it a fun but useless course of study.  My college boyfriend who studied engineering thought my study abroad to become fluent in a different language was frivolous, never mind that I was immersed with university students and taking all the same classes the native-language speakers did. 

      Education is so much more than the courses you take - it's the people you meet, where you travel to, sports you play, clubs you're in and miserable crap you endure to get the degree.  I find these all valuable experiences.   High school and college are the few places where you're afforded a certain leverage to fail, learn from that failure and pick yourself up and figure things out.
    redwoodoriginalTheMostHappy15ILoveBeachMusicemmaaa
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