Wedding Etiquette Forum

Honeymoon registry-still tacky?

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Re: Honeymoon registry-still tacky?

  • No.

    There's a huge difference between "This is something I would like" and "buy me this!"

    You seem to be confusing the two due to your own issues with being asked your gift preferences.  But there's nothing rude with a wishlist, and that's all a registry is.  Plkus, we have explained the historical and practical purpose behind it several times now.
    I'm not confusing anything. Where in the honey-fund does it say "buy me this"? Because I've seen many honey-funds and I have yet to see wording that differs, in any way, from a traditional registry. Honey-funds, just like registries, say "this is something we would like." It's not like they tie you down and force you to buy it.
    Yes, you are.  And now you are confusing a traditional wedding registry for a honeyfund.

    Honeyfunds don't actually say "this is something we would like" because as has been stated ad nauseum already, the couple is not actually registering for anything physical- no excursions, no plane tickets, nothing.  They are registering for the cash value minus a 3%-5% service fee of a theoretical item.

    Honeyfunds say "I'm pretending to want a dolphin excursion but in reality I'm asking for cash" because that's all the couple actually gets from the honeyfund.

    With a traditional registry  a couple is saying "these are things I'd like" and then if you buy from the registry they actually, physically get the things they said they would like.
    Here's a tip: just because someone disagrees with you doesn't mean they're confused or don't know what they're talking about. It simply means they disagree. I'm not confusing anything for a honey-fund. I'm saying that in my opinion, BOTH are tacky. It's a perfectly valid opinion and I'm allowed to have it without you repeatedly telling me how confused I am.

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    You certainly seem confused because you keep switching topics.

    You brought up traditional wedding registries by saying that all registries are tacky.  Banana and I explained why that's just not the case, and why traditional registries are actually not tacky, according to etiquette standards and not our opinions; Since this is the etiquette board, we try to give information based on approved etiquette standards.

    Then you switched back to discussing Honeyfunds.  And you continue to confuse your personal opinion regarding registries as a standard of etiquette, which it isn't.

    You can think it's tacky to have a registry and for anyone to ever have a gift wishlist of any kind, but wedding registries are perfectly acceptable and not tacky by etiquette standards, whereas Honeyfunds are not acceptable at all.

    "Love is the one thing we're capable of perceiving that transcends time and space."


  • redoryx said:
    There is nothing that I can find that states empirically that they are against etiquette other than the *opinion* of some people.  

    When I posted a link to an etiquette section of a website that indicated they were perfectly fine, people commented that the site was saying that because they were getting advertising from the site or they were plain wrong, or that site didn't know proper etiquette.  Ridiculous.

    So you say they are improper and I say they are fine.  That is about as much authority and proof of whether they're acceptable as you're going to find.

    What sort of proof or source are you looking for? I do research for a living so I will happily take on the challenge of finding a source that will satisfy you if you give me some parameters. 

    But I have a feeling that nothing we show you will be good enough for you. 
    I would like to see an honest and unbiased search that proves for a fact that a HM registry is rude, as many are stating here.  The first thing I googled came up with a validation of wedding registries, so imo no way you can say factually rude and against etiquette.

    To me, this from Emily Post is all the proof you need that there are a variety of *viewpoints* and *opinions* on the subject - why would Emily Post have this if not "allowed"
    You can register for a honeymoon or a trip (be careful – some services charge a fee or a percentage of the gift to cover “handling”) or even dance lessons.
    http://www.emilypost.com/weddings/wedding-registries-gifts-and-thank-yous/520-tamingtheweddingregistry

  • redoryx said:
    There is nothing that I can find that states empirically that they are against etiquette other than the *opinion* of some people.  

    When I posted a link to an etiquette section of a website that indicated they were perfectly fine, people commented that the site was saying that because they were getting advertising from the site or they were plain wrong, or that site didn't know proper etiquette.  Ridiculous.

    So you say they are improper and I say they are fine.  That is about as much authority and proof of whether they're acceptable as you're going to find.

    What sort of proof or source are you looking for? I do research for a living so I will happily take on the challenge of finding a source that will satisfy you if you give me some parameters. 

    But I have a feeling that nothing we show you will be good enough for you. 
    I would like to see an honest and unbiased search that proves for a fact that a HM registry is rude, as many are stating here.  The first thing I googled came up with a validation of wedding registries, so imo no way you can say factually rude and against etiquette.

    To me, this from Emily Post is all the proof you need that there are a variety of *viewpoints* and *opinions* on the subject - why would Emily Post have this if not "allowed"
    You can register for a honeymoon or a trip (be careful – some services charge a fee or a percentage of the gift to cover “handling”) or even dance lessons.
    http://www.emilypost.com/weddings/wedding-registries-gifts-and-thank-yous/520-tamingtheweddingregistry

    I do appreciate that you've hung in and tried to engage in the discourse here but generally, when you're on an etiquette board, and literally EVERYONE says something is not a good idea/rude/not in keeping with accepted etiquette and so on - that it's probably not going to be in keeping with etiquette (aka, good manners, aka, guidelines on how to make others comfortable), etc.  @snowywinter mistakenly referred to this as an "opinion board".  It's an etiquette board, where regular posters are pretty well versed when it comes to the rules of etiquette.  I've learned quite a bit here myself.  The thing is, etiquette rules were developed to give us all universal guidelines by which to treat one another with respect.  They are actually really inflexible (!) and not subject to opinion.  If they were subject to opinion, they would be pointless.  They exist to provide universally applicable guidelines on how to behave politely.  Again, you are free to agree with them and be a polite person or you are quite free to disagree with them and run the risk of being thought of as impolite.  

    BTW, Emily Post is dead.  Many think the values her family promotes are more for commercial purposes than to advance her legacy.  

  • redoryx said:
    There is nothing that I can find that states empirically that they are against etiquette other than the *opinion* of some people.  

    When I posted a link to an etiquette section of a website that indicated they were perfectly fine, people commented that the site was saying that because they were getting advertising from the site or they were plain wrong, or that site didn't know proper etiquette.  Ridiculous.

    So you say they are improper and I say they are fine.  That is about as much authority and proof of whether they're acceptable as you're going to find.

    What sort of proof or source are you looking for? I do research for a living so I will happily take on the challenge of finding a source that will satisfy you if you give me some parameters. 

    But I have a feeling that nothing we show you will be good enough for you. 
    I would like to see an honest and unbiased search that proves for a fact that a HM registry is rude, as many are stating here.  The first thing I googled came up with a validation of wedding registries, so imo no way you can say factually rude and against etiquette.

    To me, this from Emily Post is all the proof you need that there are a variety of *viewpoints* and *opinions* on the subject - why would Emily Post have this if not "allowed"
    You can register for a honeymoon or a trip (be careful – some services charge a fee or a percentage of the gift to cover “handling”) or even dance lessons.
    http://www.emilypost.com/weddings/wedding-registries-gifts-and-thank-yous/520-tamingtheweddingregistry

    I do appreciate that you've hung in and tried to engage in the discourse here but generally, when you're on an etiquette board, and literally EVERYONE says something is not a good idea/rude/not in keeping with accepted etiquette and so on - that it's probably not going to be in keeping with etiquette (aka, good manners, aka, guidelines on how to make others comfortable), etc.  @snowywinter mistakenly referred to this as an "opinion board".  It's an etiquette board, where regular posters are pretty well versed when it comes to the rules of etiquette.  I've learned quite a bit here myself.  The thing is, etiquette rules were developed to give us all universal guidelines by which to treat one another with respect.  They are actually really inflexible (!) and not subject to opinion.  If they were subject to opinion, they would be pointless.  They exist to provide universally applicable guidelines on how to behave politely.  Again, you are free to agree with them and be a polite person or you are quite free to disagree with them and run the risk of being thought of as impolite.  

    BTW, Emily Post is dead.  Many think the values her family promotes are more for commercial purposes than to advance her legacy.  
    Agree = polite.  Disagree = impolite.  Thx for the balanced & reasoned options :)

    Emily Post is now a commercial endeavor, and a site that is set up as *one* of many arbiters of proper values has no weight in the discussion of values?  I've found several mentions of HM reg as ok and they are all wrong for some odd reason.

    Instead, I should take my cues on *proper* etiquette from people who prefer cussing and lecturing others on what is right and wrong and focus on how they are being scammed by wedding couples & websites instead of just allowing them to do what makes them happy.  Seems like a bad idea to me.
  • Blue_Bird said:




    redoryx said:



    There is nothing that I can find that states empirically that they are against etiquette other than the *opinion* of some people.  

    When I posted a link to an etiquette section of a website that indicated they were perfectly fine, people commented that the site was saying that because they were getting advertising from the site or they were plain wrong, or that site didn't know proper etiquette.  Ridiculous.

    So you say they are improper and I say they are fine.  That is about as much authority and proof of whether they're acceptable as you're going to find.


    What sort of proof or source are you looking for? I do research for a living so I will happily take on the challenge of finding a source that will satisfy you if you give me some parameters. 

    But I have a feeling that nothing we show you will be good enough for you. 

    I would like to see an honest and unbiased search that proves for a fact that a HM registry is rude, as many are stating here.  The first thing I googled came up with a validation of wedding registries, so imo no way you can say factually rude and against etiquette.

    To me, this from Emily Post is all the proof you need that there are a variety of *viewpoints* and *opinions* on the subject - why would Emily Post have this if not "allowed"
    You can register for a honeymoon or a trip (be careful – some
    services charge a fee or a percentage of the gift to cover
    “handling”) or even dance lessons.
    http://www.emilypost.com/weddings/wedding-registries-gifts-and-thank-yous/520-tamingtheweddingregistry




    You realize that Emily Post is dead, and she didn't write that, correct?


    Didn't read my earlier post evidently.
  • Yes, of course I know she is dead & didn't write that  - I meant the site Emily Post.

  • Pupatella said:
    This is an interesting discussion but I'll try one more analogy for you.

    Bed Bath and Beyond: They are in the business of selling household goods. Couple registers for pots and pans. Pots and pans are given to the couple.

    Honeyfund: Their business is collecting a fee from the couples who register - they are selling no product, only a service. Couple registers for pots and pans. Couple receives cash (minus a fee), and may or may not purchase pots and pans. (Honeyfund was shown on the TV show Shark Tank, and is definitely a growing business, but just please take a step back and think about how they are actually making money).
    I saw that Shark Tank.    If I had known I would have never given that couple the "helicopter" ride.   

    Spending money on a service that basically collects money, gains interest while the guest's money is sitting there and then cuts a "check", but not before it takes it's cut is not a business I want to give my money to.   Sorrynotsorry.       Especially when I can just.. you know.. write my own check and give it to the couple themselves.   

     If you think about it, logging into a website, picking things to go into your "cart", then filling out all your contact and financial information is not really easier on the guests then them just writing out a check on your own.






    What differentiates an average host and a great host is anticipating unexpressed needs and wants of their guests.  Just because the want/need is not expressed, doesn't mean it wouldn't be appreciated. 
  • PupatellaPupatella member
    Combo Breaker First Anniversary 5 Love Its First Comment
    edited September 2015
    I'll further add that if a couple would register for a helicopter tour on their honeymoon, and I could actually buy them the helicopter tour that they wanted, I would definitely be up for that!! What I'm not up for is some third party taking away part of the gift that was intended for the couple.

    If I give them cash, and they buy a helicopter tour, or put the cash away in their savings, or whatever, I'm perfectly fine with that!!

    What I'm not okay with is the concept of the website, and how couples are using the website to register for "items" that they have no intention of using, to just get money.


  • You are welcome to your opinion, but that doesn't mean it's correct.
    Right back at ya
  • This post is from 2007, but this site is well versed in proper etiquette. 

    Many of us know what we are talking about in regards to etiquette. Just because many people think honeymoon registries are fine, doesn't mean that is true. There are a lot of weddings that don't follow proper etiquette, just because everyone does it, doesn't make it right.
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  • This post is from 2007, but this site is well versed in proper etiquette. 

    Many of us know what we are talking about in regards to etiquette. Just because many people think honeymoon registries are fine, doesn't mean that is true. There are a lot of weddings that don't follow proper etiquette, just because everyone does it, doesn't make it right.
    Is the lady from the 1920s in the upper right corner supposed to represent the cabal of etiquette police? Scary... Good start.

    The text in that link seemed like a long lecture from someone with a stick firmly up her butt and an axe to grind.  None of her points resonated to me, but her anger and sanctimonious attitude sure did.  If anyone talked to me like that I'd ask them to repeat so my friends could have a good laugh.

    So that's the beacon of proper decorum from which your truths spew?  Makes sense now.

  • You are welcome to your opinion, but that doesn't mean it's correct.
    Right back at ya
    That's the only thing you took out of my post. 

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    Have a honeymoon registry, we don't care. People will judge you, though. And we are trying to give proper advice to people who may be lurking.

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  • No.

    There's a huge difference between "This is something I would like" and "buy me this!"

    You seem to be confusing the two due to your own issues with being asked your gift preferences.  But there's nothing rude with a wishlist, and that's all a registry is.  Plkus, we have explained the historical and practical purpose behind it several times now.
    I'm not confusing anything. Where in the honey-fund does it say "buy me this"? Because I've seen many honey-funds and I have yet to see wording that differs, in any way, from a traditional registry. Honey-funds, just like registries, say "this is something we would like." It's not like they tie you down and force you to buy it.
    Yes, you are.  And now you are confusing a traditional wedding registry for a honeyfund.

    Honeyfunds don't actually say "this is something we would like" because as has been stated ad nauseum already, the couple is not actually registering for anything physical- no excursions, no plane tickets, nothing.  They are registering for the cash value minus a 3%-5% service fee of a theoretical item.

    Honeyfunds say "I'm pretending to want a dolphin excursion but in reality I'm asking for cash" because that's all the couple actually gets from the honeyfund.

    With a traditional registry  a couple is saying "these are things I'd like" and then if you buy from the registry they actually, physically get the things they said they would like.
    Here's a tip: just because someone disagrees with you doesn't mean they're confused or don't know what they're talking about. It simply means they disagree. I'm not confusing anything for a honey-fund. I'm saying that in my opinion, BOTH are tacky. It's a perfectly valid opinion and I'm allowed to have it without you repeatedly telling me how confused I am.

    image



    You certainly seem confused because you keep switching topics.

    You brought up traditional wedding registries by saying that all registries are tacky.  Banana and I explained why that's just not the case, and why traditional registries are actually not tacky, according to etiquette standards and not our opinions; Since this is the etiquette board, we try to give information based on approved etiquette standards.

    Then you switched back to discussing Honeyfunds.  And you continue to confuse your personal opinion regarding registries as a standard of etiquette, which it isn't.

    You can think it's tacky to have a registry and for anyone to ever have a gift wishlist of any kind, but wedding registries are perfectly acceptable and not tacky by etiquette standards, whereas Honeyfunds are not acceptable at all.
    You seem to be the one confused as you can't follow a very simple progression. Anyway, you seem to enjoy the argument regardless of the futility in changing one's opinion, despite the fact that not all opinions have to be etiquette based, even on -- shocking! -- the etiquette board. In fact, there are plenty of things that are totally in-line with etiquette that I don't care for - Friday afternoon weddings, weekday weddings, an all-vegan reception menu, an outdoor afternoon wedding in July, etc. etc. And I'm perfectly fine with having an opinion on these topics that does not meet with your approval, believe me. So continue to argue away, on your own. I'm out.
  • Just curious, do you find the tone of this person's acceptable and observing proper etiquette?  I hope not.

    http://weddinghellsbells.com/?p=3008

  • You are welcome to your opinion, but that doesn't mean it's correct.

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    People will judge you, though. And we are trying to give proper advice to people who may be lurking.

    Classy
  • edited September 2015
    No.

    There's a huge difference between "This is something I would like" and "buy me this!"

    You seem to be confusing the two due to your own issues with being asked your gift preferences.  But there's nothing rude with a wishlist, and that's all a registry is.  Plkus, we have explained the historical and practical purpose behind it several times now.
    I'm not confusing anything. Where in the honey-fund does it say "buy me this"? Because I've seen many honey-funds and I have yet to see wording that differs, in any way, from a traditional registry. Honey-funds, just like registries, say "this is something we would like." It's not like they tie you down and force you to buy it.
    Yes, you are.  And now you are confusing a traditional wedding registry for a honeyfund.

    Honeyfunds don't actually say "this is something we would like" because as has been stated ad nauseum already, the couple is not actually registering for anything physical- no excursions, no plane tickets, nothing.  They are registering for the cash value minus a 3%-5% service fee of a theoretical item.

    Honeyfunds say "I'm pretending to want a dolphin excursion but in reality I'm asking for cash" because that's all the couple actually gets from the honeyfund.

    With a traditional registry  a couple is saying "these are things I'd like" and then if you buy from the registry they actually, physically get the things they said they would like.
    Here's a tip: just because someone disagrees with you doesn't mean they're confused or don't know what they're talking about. It simply means they disagree. I'm not confusing anything for a honey-fund. I'm saying that in my opinion, BOTH are tacky. It's a perfectly valid opinion and I'm allowed to have it without you repeatedly telling me how confused I am.

    image



    You certainly seem confused because you keep switching topics.

    You brought up traditional wedding registries by saying that all registries are tacky.  Banana and I explained why that's just not the case, and why traditional registries are actually not tacky, according to etiquette standards and not our opinions; Since this is the etiquette board, we try to give information based on approved etiquette standards.

    Then you switched back to discussing Honeyfunds.  And you continue to confuse your personal opinion regarding registries as a standard of etiquette, which it isn't.

    You can think it's tacky to have a registry and for anyone to ever have a gift wishlist of any kind, but wedding registries are perfectly acceptable and not tacky by etiquette standards, whereas Honeyfunds are not acceptable at all.
    You seem to be the one confused as you can't follow a very simple progression. Anyway, you seem to enjoy the argument regardless of the futility in changing one's opinion, despite the fact that not all opinions have to be etiquette based, even on -- shocking! -- the etiquette board. In fact, there are plenty of things that are totally in-line with etiquette that I don't care for - Friday afternoon weddings, weekday weddings, an all-vegan reception menu, an outdoor afternoon wedding in July, etc. etc. And I'm perfectly fine with having an opinion on these topics that does not meet with your approval, believe me. So continue to argue away, on your own. I'm out.
    ***boxes*** Bye, Felicia.

    "Love is the one thing we're capable of perceiving that transcends time and space."


  • This thread is a good example of why I dislike using the term "tacky" when we really mean "rude" and "against etiquette/bad manners."  It just muddies the water.

    Honeymoon registries are against etiquette for a very simple reason: it's rude to ask for cash.  A honeymoon registry is a request for cash that is pretending not to be requesting cash.  The HR lists specific items or experiences, but that's not what you get.  What you get is cash, minus fees.  Therefore it is deceptive, pretending to be a registry for items but really a registry for cash, which is always against etiquette, period.

    Traditional registries get a pass because they're simply a reference for people to look at if they want to know what kinds of things you need in your house and what your color and style preference is.  You do not have to buy the specific items on the registry; you can just look at it to get a sense of the couple and their personal style, and then if you're inclined to get them a gift you can choose one of those specific items or something else entirely.  Cash, on the other hand, is a one-size-fits-all gift.  Nobody has to be told that the happy couple would also appreciate money as a present.  It's not helpful to the giver to tell them this, and it's not appropriate to either straight-up ask for cash or to deceive your guests into giving you cash by making them think that they're buying you a specific item/excursion/experience that you would enjoy.



  • MFW when "43 new"

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  • Heffalump said:
    Can someone please explain the Honeyfund love to me?  I just don't see why it makes practical sense.

    Let's say my aunt and uncle have a budget of $150 for my wedding gift.  They give me $150 cash, DH and I get $150 cash, we send a thank you note, done.

    Or, they give $150 to Honeyfund.  I actually went to the site, and right there in black and white, their fee is 2.8% + $0.30.  Whip out my calculator: ($150 x 0.028) + $0.30 = $4.50.  $150 - $4.50 = $145.50.  Say you repeat this scenario with 100 guests, and now you have $450 less (give or take) than if you hadn't used Honeyfund. 

    So why is this a thing, again?
    I think it's a thing because if you registered for actual physical gifts, then people may be more inclined to purchase those gifts for you instead of giving you cash. If you register for "experiences", and now you have $145.50 instead of a physical item, then maybe you are happy with that because you wanted cash.

    "you" is not directed at you, but the people who actually registered with a honeyfund.

    Also, I didn't realize that there was a fee, or that people were registering for "experiences" and not using the experience before reading the stories on TK. I'm sure couples register on honeyfund thinking it's a great way to get cash, don't read the fine print, and then are surprised when they get a check for less than what they were expecting.

    I'm guessing honeyfund dupes not only the givers but also the receivers. More reason to completely avoid using these registries altogether.

  • chibiyui said:
    Dedicated troll is dedicated. 

    7/10, I give you points for being in character and remaining in character for 4 pages, plus resurrecting a zombie thread, but deducted the 3 points for being boring. If you're going to troll, you need to attempt to elicit a response beyond eyerolls, particularly within 4 pages. It's just not an effective use of time. Would not read additional threads by this troll. 
    QFT.  

    This poster seems to love the etiquette board, even though it might not be the best fit.  Dedication.
  • Etiquette is not a matter of opinion though.  It is about treating people respectfully in all walks of life. Would you ever go up to someone and ask them straight up for money?  Unless you are a beggar or fund raising for charity, most decent and respectful people would never go to someone else and ask them for cash.  Even people with financial troubles have more pride than to ask others for a handout.

    That is exactly what a honeyfund is, it is asking for cash disguised as a vacation.  It is even more deceiving when the items your family & friends think they are buying you, ends up being a check for their gifted amount minus fees.

    Also, this maybe the etiquette board, but this is also a place full of adults.  Sometimes we like to fucking use adult language too.


    Frankly, all registries are tacky when you think about it. You're essentially telling people what to buy you just because you're getting married.
    I grew up in a family where you ALWAYS took a gift to a wedding or birthday, but I never felt comfortable telling people what to get me and I don't feel comfortable doing it for my wedding either. I don't really see much of a difference between setting up a "honey fund" or a Target registry. They're both tacky, in my opinion. And don't even get me started on home remodeling funds or (gag) lingerie registries.
    No, that's not the point of a registry nor how they work.

    Wedding registries are "serving suggestions" meant to give people an idea of what you would like if they were to buy  you towels or sheet sets or appliances, etc.  Otherwise no one would know that you are doing your bathroom in blue and gold or that you already have a toaster but not a toaster oven.  They were especially useful when couples did not live together prior to marriage and so did not already have an established household of stuff.
    How does that go against what I said? You are telling people what to buy you because you are getting married. Who cares that you're doing your bathroom in blue and gold. It's YOUR bathroom, so get what you need for it yourself. I don't know, I just don't get the whole "this is what I want if you want to buy me a gift." I just think registries, in general, are tacky.
    You are not telling them what to buy you. . . because no one has to buy you anything at all.   You are telling people that if they want to buy you towels, you prefer blue and gold because those are the colors that match your bathroom.  You are just giving people a list of ideas of things you actually would like and use.

    It's no different than telling someone what you'd like for Christmas or your birthday if asked.  Have you never been asked what you'd like for Christmas or your birthday?
    Yes, you ARE telling them them what to buy you. You're absolutely right, they don't have to buy you anything. So why have a registry at all then? A registry is saying "this is what we like if you're inclined to buy us a gift," just like a honey-fund is saying "this is what we want if you're inclined to buy us a gift." The message is the same, even if the honey-fund is disingenuous due to the middle man.

    And yes, I have been asked what I want for Christmas or birthdays, as I said in my first post and I feel extremely awkward answering any such question and I try to avoid it like the plague.
    Nopity. I use the registry as a guide. I often mix and match with registry and non-registry items or I just straight out go off registry if I know the person well enough. I also just give cash!

  • Heffalump said:
    Can someone please explain the Honeyfund love to me?  I just don't see why it makes practical sense.

    Let's say my aunt and uncle have a budget of $150 for my wedding gift.  They give me $150 cash, DH and I get $150 cash, we send a thank you note, done.

    Or, they give $150 to Honeyfund.  I actually went to the site, and right there in black and white, their fee is 2.8% + $0.30.  Whip out my calculator: ($150 x 0.028) + $0.30 = $4.50.  $150 - $4.50 = $145.50.  Say you repeat this scenario with 100 guests, and now you have $450 less (give or take) than if you hadn't used Honeyfund. 

    So why is this a thing, again?

    ETA:  I thought about it, and realistically, for 100 guests it would be roughly half of my figure, since most probably bring dates and give a gift as a couple, not individually.  It was an arbitrary number, but still.
    I pretty much think people who use HM funds are not financially savvy.  Or they just are rolling in the dough that a paying a few hundred dollar fee isn't not a big deal.

    People have been giving cash/checks for a long time.   My sister got married 20 years ago and got a shit ton of cash/checks.   It's not a new thing.    But we seem to live in a time where if it's on the internet then it must be a good idea.

    Sorry, no.  Giving a company $50, llet alone even more to hold gift money (while getting interest) then cutting me a check a few weeks after the wedding is asinine.  

    I also kind of laugh that a lot of these same people who want to us HM funds have sticker shock on something like food costs. Yet paying a 3rd party company hundreds of dollars to collect gift money is money well spent.  Yeah, okay.






    What differentiates an average host and a great host is anticipating unexpressed needs and wants of their guests.  Just because the want/need is not expressed, doesn't mean it wouldn't be appreciated. 
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